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In concurrent programming, an operation (or set of operations) is atomic, linearizable, indivisible or uninterruptible if it appears to the rest of the system to occur instantaneously. Atomicity is a guarantee of isolation from concurrent processes. Additionally, atomic operations commonly have a succeed-or-fail definition — they either successfully change the state of the system, or have no visible effect.

In concurrent programming, an operation (or set of operations) is atomic, linearizable, indivisible or uninterruptible if it appears to the rest of the system to occur instantaneously. Atomicity is a guarantee of isolation from concurrent processes. Additionally, atomic operations commonly have a succeed-or-fail definition — they either successfully change the state of the system, or have no visible effect.

Atomicity is commonly enforced by mutual exclusion, whether at the hardware level building on a cache coherency protocol, or the software level using semaphores or locks. Thus, an atomic operation does not actually occur instantaneously. The benefit comes from the appearance: the system behaves as if each operation occurred instantly, separated by pauses. Because of this, implementation details may be ignored by the user, except insofar as they affect performance. If an operation is not atomic, the user will also need to understand and cope with sporadic extraneous behaviour caused by interactions between concurrent operations, which by its nature is likely to be hard to reproduce and debug.

Source: Wikipedia

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