Hot answers tagged

11

This is a bridging problem as per AudioServices.h not found in objective-C iOS project that includes AudioToolbox framework Basically you need to use (__bridge void*)self in those 3 places.


9

As far as I can find, you have to use Audio Units to access the system's echo cancellation. You do that by using kAudioUnitSubType_VoiceProcessingIO instead of kAudioUnitSubType_RemoteIO. You probably want to use Audio Units anyway, in order to control your latency. You can use a render callback function to get data from an Audio Queue and pass it to your ...


8

// so you don't have to hunt them all down when you decide to switch to float: #define AUDIO_DATA_TYPE_FORMAT SInt16 // the actual sample-grabbing code: int sampleCount = inBuffer->mAudioDataBytesCapacity / sizeof(AUDIO_DATA_TYPE_FORMAT); AUDIO_DATA_TYPE_FORMAT *samples = (AUDIO_DATA_TYPE_FORMAT*)inBuffer->mAudioData; Then you have your ...


6

Try with the previous post. Though the question is different but you can use following code out of that ticked answer. Refer this below code in previous post. OSStatus errorMsg = AudioQueueSetParameter(audioQueue, kAudioQueueParam_Volume, Level); if (errorMsg) { NSLog(@"AudioQueueSetParameter returned %d when setting the volume.", errorMsg); ...


6

AudioQueueStart is not the function that will help you to do that. The time there is like a delay, if you pass NULL then it means that the queue will start ASAP. You have to pass the frame you want to play and enqueue it, to calculate that you have to know the number of frames your file has and the (relative) position you want to play. These are ...


6

I found the issue! seems like on iOS 7 there is a need to set this also (I assume this is only practically therefore it's hard to find, isn't written anywhere). Just add this code before calling any AudioQueue function: AudioSessionInitialize(NULL, NULL, nil, ( void *)(self) ...


5

I have some experience with GPS background mode, and background audio. This is not exactly the same as your situation (you want to play a long audio file, and I play short messages) but here's what I can tell you: beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler This selector has one purpose when being invoked when in background: avoid the application to return ...


5

AudioSessionInitialize(NULL, NULL, interruptionListener, (__bridge void*)self); because you are using ARC, so you need to transfer (void *) into (__bridge void*)


4

From my personal - and sometimes painful - experience, I'd say use AudioQueue for streaming type applications. For anything else, use AudioUnit. The latter maybe lower level, but I didn't see much difference in complexity. To be honest, AudioUnit seemed a lot more straightforward to work with. Theoretically, with AudioUnit you should be able to use other ...


4

AudioQueueStop should work and be sufficient. From Apples Documentation, AudioQueueReset is called from AudioQueueStop. AudioQueueDispose is a bit too much if you want to start it again later.


4

I will answer your second question first - don't wait for the app to crash, you can stop pulling audio from the track by checking the number of samples that are available in the CMSampleBufferRef you are reading; for example (this code will also be included in the 2nd half of my answer): CMSampleBufferRef sample; sample = [readerOutput ...


3

If you are using the AudioQueue API you need to do some extra steps that depends on some factor. I've never done that, so I will leave the explanation to the expert : there is a video on that topic in the Apple Developer website that cover that exact problem. WWDC 2010 session 412 Audio Development for iPhone OS part 1 around the 45th minutes you've got a ...


3

A search with Spotlight reveals that "66686" is to be found in AudioQueue.h: kAudioQueueErr_BufferEmpty = -66686 So, whatever you are trying to do, the buffer is empty. From a quick look at the code above, it looks to me like the SpeakHere recording code. However, you've set it up above for playback. In either case, you need to allocate the ...


3

From your description, it sounds as if you're trying to write a software synthesizer. The only way that you could use AVAudioPlayer for something like this would be to compose the entire duration of a note as a single WAV file and then play the whole thing with AVAudioPlayer. To create a note sound of arbitrary duration, one that begins playing in response ...


3

Two possible items to check: Your posted code is mixing the use of AudioSampleType and AudioUnitSampleType, which are two different sized data types. You are also specifying the kAudioFormatFlagIsNonInterleaved flag on only 1 channel of data, which probably isn't necessary.


3

The mp3 encoder is not bundled in iOS as far as I know as it's a patented algorithm. You can only decode (playback) mp3 audio. Consider using ffmpeg or some other encoder on the server side to transform the audio to mp3. Or get LAME (mp3 encoder) as listed in this answer.


3

If you want to modify audio in real-time you might want to try using RemoteIO Audio Unit instead. When using audio queues, you have to save the data from the recording queue callback and later feed the processed data to the play queue callback, in a different callback at a different time. For this you probably have to use an intermediate queue or data ...


3

I have used below code to Device Control - [[UIApplication sharedApplication] beginReceivingRemoteControlEvents]; [self becomeFirstResponder]; Used to get register for listening the remote control. Once done remove it - [[UIApplication sharedApplication] endReceivingRemoteControlEvents]; [self resignFirstResponder]; make the App ...


3

Instead of sending the data you receive from the audio file stream callback directly to the audio queue, you could convert it to PCM, run your analysis, and then feed it to the audio queue (as PCM) if you still need to play it. To do the conversion, you could use Audio Converter Services (which will be a screaming nightmare without end), or an offline audio ...


3

I was having this problem and like Radu said, the problem that I seemed to be having was trying to play a sound while it was already playing. I don't think it's a big deal if the sound gets replaced by another sound, but be careful that you're not trying to play the same sound while it is already playing.


3

After playing with different audio session properties, I found that -16981 error takes place when kAudioSessionProperty_OverrideCategoryMixWithOthers is enabled (TRUE). As soon, as I set it to '0', AudioQueueStart() executes successfully. So, before starting the audio session try: UInt32 allowMixing = 0; status = AudioSessionSetProperty ( ...


3

Chiming in a little late, but if you haven't solved your problem this might help. If you stop myAudio before you play myAudio you could eliminate the problem. So where you have: myAudio.numberOfLoops = loopsCount; [myAudio prepareToPlay]; [myAudio play]; Try changing it to: [myAudio stop]; myAudio.numberOfLoops = loopsCount; ...


3

@Idan your answer is correct and working but it only shows warning if app minimun deployment target is iOS 7. For iOS 7 we can do something like this: NSError *audioSessionError; AVAudioSession *audioSession = [AVAudioSession sharedInstance]; [audioSession setCategory:AVAudioSessionCategoryPlayAndRecord error:&audioSessionError]; ...


2

An audio recording from a microphone will not contain a single frequency that you can represent in Hz. Instead, it will be a combination of a lot of different frequencies mixed together, which are represented by your samples. To get the frequencies in your sample and their amplitude, you need to use the Fast Fourier transform. From the results you can ...


2

When playing back your recording, try set the AudioSession to Playback category.


2

Edit: I've seen iOS freak out and spontaneously change buffer sizes when presented with a non-power-of-two audio buffer. (Another SO question references this) Anyway, 30000 is (a) a HUGE buffer size, and (b) a weird number to use for a buffer. Usually they're in powers of 2— i.e. *=2 from 64, i.e. 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, 4096. I've never seen one ...


2

Here is a class that uses Audio File Services to get at bitrate / packet / frame data to grab the amount of bytes from a music file that correspond to x seconds, the example has been tested with mp3 and m4a files Header #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> #import <AudioToolbox/AudioToolbox.h> @interface MusicChunker : NSObject { AudioFileID ...


2

Your solution is to set up your own internal buffering of the incoming audio data until you have buffered the amount of data required. The buffer size you allocate indicates the maximum amount of data that can fill that buffer, not the minimum. The Audio Queue API is based on top of other iOS audio APIs, and may change its behavior depending on a number of ...


2

Well, there is: AudioQueuePause(audioQueue); where audioQueue is the reference to your AudioQueue. For more information, check out the Audio Queue Services Reference for iPhone or Mac OSX.


2

The classic example of writing and reading to audio buffers using AudioQueue is Apple's SpeakHere sample project. You can find tons of stuff on this and on the web. Just search on "speakhere". One standout page is Matt Gallagher's articles on Streaming and playing an MP3 stream. Check out my personal answers also. I have some quite in depth posts on audio ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible