Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

There are a couple ways you can do this. Generate a UUID for your token and store it in a db table along with the desired expiration datetime. Then when someone calls the URL with the token, you can just check it against the db for validity and expiration. If you don't want to use a db to store the tokens, you can use GPG to encrypt a string that contains ...


2

You can use Custom User by extending the existing User model in Django. You can refer Extending user Model for more details. Hope this helps.


3

Django 1.9 will have a PersistentRemoteUserMiddleware, which will work when the authentication header is only present on the login page. If you look at the patch, it shouldn't be too hard to do something similar in Django 1.8. I would try overriding process_request so that it doesn't call self._remove_invalid_user(request) to log out your user (that might ...


0

I want to check it in SoapUI, so where i should put this line: Authorization: Basic dXNlcjpwYXNzd29yZA==


1

WebDAV uses an HTTP authentication. So you put your credentials to an HTTP header, not to the WebDAV XML in the HTTP body. The basic HTTP authentication works like: You get a WWW-Authenticate header from the server WWW-Authenticate: Basic realm="server" You include the Authorization header to the next request. The value of the header is: ...


0

OAuth requires a user interaction basically. The user has to grant your app the permission to use his/her data. So it is not possible to do a non-interactive authentication, as you seem to want to perform. If you want to post as a Page for example, it is possible to create an eternal Page Access Token (for example via Graph Explorer), which you can then ...


0

I would suggest to you to use the UserNamePasswordValidator for custom validation, it fits to your requirement. You just need to inherit and implement validate from UserNamePasswordValidator class like this: public class CustomUserNameValidator : UserNamePasswordValidator { public override void Validate(string userName, string password) { if (null ...


1

Facebook, Google doesn't return you user profile name, e-mail when authorizing. They are giving you access token that can be used for future requests. You need to request for example to Facebook Graph API for name, email with your MobileServiceAuthenticationToken. You can use this library for accessing to Facebook API: ...


0

You can use a combination of the devise gem and doorkeeper gem to support web and mobile authentication. For example, I used devise for signing up users and handling forget password and email confirmation flow. For mobile clients, I used the doorkeeper gem as a oauth2 provider to protect my apis. There are many oauth2 grant flows supported by the doorkeeper ...


0

Have your app generate a random token string each time it sends anything to the server. Then have your server send back an encrypted string back to the app based on the token. If the encrypted token string from the server decrypts to the original in memory random token string allow the software to proceed....if not halt execution. This will stop the ...


0

Wow, I did it. I figured it out. I... I can't believe it. As metioned in my question Update 2, this code is assembled from Google's official API C# example and Microsoft's Custom AuthenticationFilter tutorial and code example. I'm going to paste the AuthorizeAsync() here and go over what each block of code does. If you think you see an issue, please feel ...


0

I think I see one way... you create a facebook app through the facebook dev portal, add the app to your account, then use the following endpoint to generate a token: GET /oauth/access_token? client_id={app-id} &client_secret={app-secret} &grant_type=client_credentials Still not clear how tie that back to a specific user account to act ...


1

Before you start a session, you could set the lifetime of the session cookie, defined in seconds. For example: session_set_cookie_params(43200,"/"); session_start(); 12 Hours = 12 * 60 Minutes = 12 * 60 * 60 Seconds => 43200 seconds Now your session should expire in 12Hours For your example: 30 Minutes * 60 Seconds => 1800 seconds For information: ...


0

We opened a ticket with MS to confirm I wasnt missing anything in my research and they actually have no replacement in IIS 7/8 for this functionality. They confirmed they deprecated it (even though they still "fully" support basic and windows authentication in IIS 7 and 8), and the only way to validate expired passwords now is to use a custom HTTP ...


2

OAuth 2.0 has been widely adopted as an authorisation flow and there are many examples / libraries out there to use as a point of reference. http://oauth.net/2/


0

As far as I'm aware the only authentication is username/password. You should never have any credentials stored in 'plain text'. At the very least do a basic encryption on your password and decrypt it in your code. I definitely recommend creating a specialised account for integration and restricting its rights as much as possible (especially using CRM ...


0

Use javascript redirect to logout page after 30 minutes: window.setTimeout(function(){ window.location.href = "/logout"; }, 1800000);


0

Have you tried using sessions? You could set a session variable up to expire after 30 minutes, the system will check for inactivity. Once the session times out, it will automatically log the user out.


0

The spec says the following on the Authentication Request (SAML Profiles, http://docs.oasis-open.org/security/saml/v2.0/saml-profiles-2.0-os.pdf, section 4.1.4.1): Note that the service provider MAY include a <Subject> element in the request that names the actual identity about which it wishes to receive an assertion. This is however rarely ...


0

Firstly, you need to define a model relationship in your User model: public function activation() { return $this->belongsTo('App\Activations', 'activation_id'); } Now, you can easily lazy load the Activation relationship from the authenticated user: $user = Auth::user()->load('activation'); If you want to get the activation status, you can ...


1

Why doesn't Auth.$requireAuth(); call Auth.$authAnonymously() so that you can reject the promise only if both failed. Basically, var defer = $q.defer(); Auth.$requireAuth().then(defer.resolve,function(){ Auth.$authAnonymously().then(defer.resolve,defer.reject) }) return defer.promise;


0

Take a look at OAuth 2.0 playground.You will get an overview of the protocol.It is basically an environment(like any app) that shows you the steps involved in the protocol. https://developers.google.com/oauthplayground/


0

I had the same issue, with a REST adapter making calls on a different port. Solved adding ENV['simple-auth'] = { crossOriginWhitelist: ['*'] }


-1

private void CreateCookie(String name, bool rememberPassword, LoginData loginData) { loginData.ActiveAccountId = loginData.ActiveAccountId ?? HttpContext.GetActiveAccountId(); var authenticationTicket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket( 1, name, DateTime.Now, DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(_timeOut), rememberPassword, ...


0

It worked for me . take a look at it. Route::when('*', 'auth.basic'); Route::get('api/getactorinfo/{actorname}', array('uses' =>'ActorController@getActorInfo')); Route::get('api/getmovieinfo/{moviename}', array('uses' =>'MovieController@getMovieInfo')); Route::put('api/addactor/{actorname}', array('uses' =>'ActorController@putActor')); ...


0

There is a very good article on this written by Simon on Devdactic here - http://devdactic.com/user-auth-angularjs-ionic/ It is focusing on Ionic but same can be implemented in Angular App as well.


2

Since Identity is claim based. You don't need any password or even any user object to authenticate users. So using storage in Identity is totally optional also. You just need create some claims and authorize your users based on those. Consider this simple example as a clue: // imaging this action is called by proxy public ActionResoult Login() { // this ...


0

You can also create a class to manager your users. Let's create db.php class. <?php class Db { private static $_dbase = 'data'; private static $_username = 'root'; private static $_passwd = ''; private static $_host = 'localhost'; private static $_options = array(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE => PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION); private static $_dsn; private static ...


0

You didn't define the MongoDB connection or made a mistake in its field: MongoDB Source : which should be named "mongoDS" See: http://jmeter.apache.org/usermanual/component_reference.html#MongoDB_Source_Config Besides, you shouldn't be using ${} in Groovy script to reference JMeter variables, use instead: vars["mongodb_database"] instead of ...


0

Figured it out. I needed to use the After validation hook inside the validator() method. :) protected function validator(array $data) { $validator = Validator::make($data, [ 'name' => 'required|max:255', 'email' => 'required|email|max:255|unique:user', 'password' => 'required|min:6', 'store_number' => ...


0

MONGODB-CR was removed from MongoDB Version 3.0 and only SCRAM-SHA-1 remained. There are many tools and applications that still use MONGODB-CR schema only and there is an workaround for putting it back to a 3.0 instance. Take a look here: https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-17459


0

Unfortunately I don't have enough reputation points to comment on the previous post, so I'll add my two cents here. Full disclosure: I work for Apigee. http://apigee.com/docs/api-services/content/oauthv2-policy#accesstokenelement explains how to give the access token to the Apigee OAuthV2 policy in a place other than the Authorization header. If you've ...


2

I'd go with the Cookie. IP addresses are often shared. There's not really a way to identify their computer other than via the browser on the web. The cookie value should include the username and an HMAC of the username (and probably a nonce too). After user registers or logs in successfully, send the device cookie. If they are trying to login without a ...


0

passport-ldapauth (disclaimer: I'm the author) does the following: Bind to the LDAP server using bindDn and bindCredentials, if provided Search for the user over this admin connection using the defined searchFilter and searchBase If one, and only one, result is returned, attempt to bind using that result and the user given password. You are not passing ...


0

there is a property in the firewall, named "security.access_rules" that add the path and the role and that'll make it so you can lock down certain routes.


0

Answer of @ocramius is accept answer But you forget to describe How to write two files basic_password.txt and digest_passwd.txt According to Zend 2 Official Doc about Basic Http Authentication: basic_passwd.txt file contains username, realm(the same realm into your configuration) and plain password -> <username>:<realm>:<credentials>\n ...


0

My mistake was simple. I had to add spring: hadoop: resourceManagerAddress: myyarnhost:8050 resourceManagerSchedulerAddress: myyarnhost:8030 to the application.yml too, but mixed up the port numbers (8030 for manager and 8050 for ManagerScheduler). And that typo has caused such effect. Maybe adding these two configuration properties ...


0

Above to my question, I have successfully added the ApplicationId as a foreign key column in AspNetUserRoles table as follow public class AspNetUserRoles : IdentityUserRole { [Key] public string ApplicationId { get; set; } [ForeignKey("ApplicationId")] public AspNetApplications AspNetApplications { get; set; } } Now I can see ...


4

I'm very concious that this post has undergone 28 edits, so I may have missed some context. I'm also concious that you've amalgamated some code from the other answers into your question and that the problem has been somewhat "turned on its head" from "why won't a valid user authenticate?" to "why does every user authenticate?". Current problem. However, as ...


0

You can achieve this at least in 3 ways: By means of web.xml By accessing SecurityContext in the filter By annotations javax.annotation.security All details can be found here: Jersey Security doc


0

You can achieve this by using ContainerRequestFilter if you'd really like to have some authorization related business logic. You can have something as follows: public void filter(ContainerRequestContext crc) throws IOException { List<UriTemplate> matchedTemplates = uriInfo.getMatchedTemplates(); String method = ...


0

If you want to allow the users to see only the items they created, here is an simple example that can achieve this behaviour: views.py from django.contrib.auth.models import User from django.shortcuts import get_object_or_404, redirect, render def show_items(request, username): user = get_object_or_404(User, username=username) if request.user == ...


1

This is a common requirement - I've written a blog post about that: http://spapas.github.io/2013/11/05/django-authoritiy-data/ but instead of users having access to their objects, users have access to the objects of their "authority" (i.e group of users belonging to same department, company etc). In any case, for all your models that you need to be ...


1

The SHA256 will always have 256 bits so it will never match an empty string. That being said, your pseudo code does not fully describe how you are validating the user input, so you could still be susceptible to a SQL injection attack.


1

#!/bin/bash OUTPUT=$(expect -c ' # To suppress any other form of output generated by spawned process log_user 0 spawn ssh dinesh@xxx.xxx.xx.xxx # To match some common prompts. Update it as per your needs. # To match literal dollar, it is escaped with backslash set prompt "#|>|\\$" expect { ...


0

I managed to implement this by doing the following: First, adding a reference to the Microsoft.Owin.Security.OpenIdConnect Nuget package. Second, configuring it in my Startup.Auth.cs: app.UseOpenIdConnectAuthentication(new OpenIdConnectAuthenticationOptions { ClientId = "From the Azure Portal (see below)", Authority = ...


0

This issue was solved using https://github.com/SamDecrock/node-http-ntlm.


0

Look at the http headers your browser is sending. After you have supplied a username and password, your browser will continue sending those details to that site until your browser session ends, or longer if you tell your browser to remember the credentials.


0

No. The only information available is the request url (path).


0

You can use the access token of current logged in user [FBSDKAccessToken currentAccessToken] and send it to your REST api. From there you can retrieve every information you need and save it to your database (except user's password of course). If a user sign in for first time in your app insert a new user in your database and save user's Facebook User ID. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included