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59

You could create a custom authorisation attribute inheriting from the standard AuthorizeAttribute with an optional bool parameter to specify whether authorisation is required or not. public class OptionalAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute { private readonly bool _authorize; public OptionalAuthorizeAttribute() { _authorize = true; } public ...


35

It seems ASP.NET MVC 4 'fixed' this by adding an AllowAnonymous attribute. David Hayden wrote about this.


21

Working example: https://github.com/ronnieoverby/mvc-ajax-auth Important parts: AjaxAuthorizeAttribute: using System.Web.Mvc; namespace MvcApplication1 { public class AjaxAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute { protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext context) { if ...


11

My personal take on this would be to split the controller. Just create another controller For the actions you don't need authentication. Or you could have : BaseController doesn't require authentication - here you have all your "base stuff" :). BaseAuthController : BaseController all actions here require authentication. That way you can have ...


10

There are two separate questions: Does authentication work with caching in MVC? Does Session work before authentication in the face of a cache (even for unauthenticated users, who still have a hopefully unique session)? The answers, respectively, are yes and no. Authentication works fine with caching. Try it with the SQL or Domain membership providers; ...


8

ActionFilter is probably a good starting point, but depending on your architecture, you may want to consider whether perimeter defense is good enough. If you are essentially building a single-layer ASP.NET MVC application (and there may be perfectly reasonable reasons to do this), an ActionFilter will provide defense that is good enough while at the same ...


7

Short answer is no. It just checks that there is a IPrincipal, how that gets there is up to you. I have my own login logic that I use instead of the Membership provider, once I've authenticated a user I just call the FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie method. Once you've done that you can then use the [Authenticate] attribute.


6

If you just want one action to be unauthorized on an otherwise authorized controller you can do something like this: public class RequiresAuthorizationAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute { private readonly bool _authorize; public RequiresAuthorizationAttribute() { _authorize = true; } public RequiresAuthorizationAttribute(bool ...


6

Yep, this is one of things i've always hated about Forms Authentication in ASP.NET - does not cater for AJAX authentication at all. Add IIS handling 401's into the mix, and it can be quite a pain. There's a few ways to do this, none of them particulary "clean". These include: Set a ViewBag flag in the controller, which corresponds to ...


6

If a controller action is decorated with the [Authorize] attribute (as is your Admin/Index action) you cannot invoke this action if you do not have a valid forms authentication cookie in the request. Also in your Login action, upon successful authentication you should not return a view but you should redirect away, so that the cookie is properly set and ...


5

Remember to enable method level security on your applicationContext-security.xml: <sec:global-method-security secured-annotations="enabled" /> If, insted you will use Pre or Post annotations, use: <security:global-method-security pre-post-annotations="enabled"/> For more on this, see: http://forum.springsource.org/showthread.php?t=77862 ...


5

You cannot use DI with attributes - they're metadata; public class MyCustomAuth : AuthorizeAttribute { public void OnAuthorization(...) { IUserService userService = ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IUserService>(); } } Learn about Windsor/ServiceLocator here. See similar question here.


5

Okay, I'm feeling a bit stupid. The problem was that I had Sandboxing turned on in the app settings in the Facebook page. Why the error page was so obtuse is beyond me. In Facebook developer settings: https://developers.facebook.com, edit your app settings. Select the "Advanced" tab, under "Settings" on the left side. Make sure that "Sandbox Mode" is not ...


4

You need to persist the user data somewhere so that all subsequent page requests have access to it. Usually you would create an authentication ticket and store it in a cookie. Then for each request you extract the data and create your IPrincipal. This can be done in the Application_AuthenticateRequest method of Global.ascx, MVC - How to store/assign roles ...


4

Thanks to Lewis comments I was able to reach this solution (which is far from perfect, posted with my own comments, if you have the fixes feel free to edit and remove this phrase), but it works: public class AjaxAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute { override public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext) { ...


4

non-authorized storage devices? This depends on how secure you want it to be. For the most secure level, it would consist of: special firmware written to the flash drive to get extra "meta info" (read: expensive custom manufacturing of flash drives) special windows driver to read that meta info from the flash drive your program talking to that device ...


4

A quick fix to this problem would be to add a authorize_admin method to a Admin::ProductsController decorator.rb app/controllers/admin_products_controller_decorator.rb Admin::ProductsController.class_eval do def authorize_admin authorize! :admin, Product authorize! params[:action].to_sym, Product end end NOTE: This will override ...


4

2 or 3 responses here explained how you can do it... but you can also use Fluent Security to handle all controllers + Actions setup in one file. Some of the benefits (from their website): Code based configuration No attributes or xml cluttering up your code. Low imprint Fluent Security won't spread like wildfire in your application. Your configuration ...


4

Simply use The [Authorize] attribute multiple times: [Authorize(Roles="Moderator")] [Authorize(Roles="Tester")] Function ActionResult Foo() { return View(); } This will require the user to be in both (or more) roles.


4

You might find this question helpful. If you're interested in how the Authorize filter works in more detail you can review the source code: AuthorizeAttribute Briefly the Authorize filter will check whether the user has been authenticated by checking the HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated property. The User property will have been set by the ...


3

Follow these steps to automatically capture your orders after the authorization: Configure the payment method to Authorize (not Direct Sale) Create an observer that will handle event called sales_order_payment_place_end with method called automaticalyCaptureOrder Use the following observer method code: public function ...


3

Login page is configured within web.config file. But you probably already know that. The real problem here is a bit more complicated. I guess you're onto something very interesting here, since Login page barely authenticates a user. It doesn't check its authorization for a particular resource (which is your case here where authorization fails) so this ...


3

You can use a custom ControllerActionInvoker and inject property dependencies (you can't do constructor injection because the framework handles instantiation of attributes). You can see a blog post I just did on this technique.


3

That's how Forms authentication works by default and has nothing to do with ASP.NET MVC. When you create an authentication cookie (FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie) to indicate that the user successfully signed this cookie will be used by the forms authentication module (the IPrincipal is set inside the FormsAuthenticationModule.OnAuthenticate method) to ...


3

In your Web.config file change the forms loginUrl. <authentication mode="Forms"> <forms loginUrl="~/Controller/Action" /> </authentication>


3

You can initialize those controllers derived from your base controller. namely put your attribute on a controller base class and to ensure that each controller within derived from base class. [Authorize(Role="Class A")] public class CustomBaseController : Controller{} public class AController: CustomBaseController{} public class BController: ...


3

I had the same problem, when my App ID was incorrect in Info Plist. <key>CFBundleURLTypes</key> <array> <dict> <key>CFBundleURLSchemes</key> <array> <string>fb305639062848xxx</string> </array> </dict> </array> I found out, that not the ...


3

Assuming that you have some sort of authentication setup in your application (forms authentication, windows authentication or OAuth) a logged in user has a token stored on their browser in the form of a cookie. When a user navigates your application, their token is passed along with them. When the Authorize attribute is applied to one of your controller ...


2

At least in my opinion, most situations like this should be handled in data, not code. Hard-coding the fact that (for example) operation X can only be done by an administrator tends to be relatively brittle. Right now, you have five classes of users, but (just for example) you'll almost inevitably (somewhere along the line) end up inventing some other class ...



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