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29

regular grammar is either right or left linear, whereas context free grammer is basically any combination of terminals and non-terminals. hence you can see that regular grammar is a subset of context-free grammar. so for a palindrome for instance, is of the form, S->ABA A->something B->something you can clearly see that palindromes cannot be ...


26

I think what you want to think about are the various pumping lemmata. A regular language can be recognized by a finite automaton. A context-free language requires a stack, and a context sensitive language requires two stacks (which is equivalent to saying it requires a full Turing machine.) So, if we think about the pumping lemma for regular languages, ...


25

No computer program will ever be able to generate a meaningful regular expression based solely on a list of valid matches. Let me show you why. Suppose you provide the examples 111111 and 999999, should the computer generate: A regex matching exactly those two examples: (111111|999999) A regex matching 6 identical digits (\d)\1{5} A regex matching 6 ones ...


23

The book An Introduction to Computational Learning Theory contains an algorithm for learning a finite automaton. As every regular language is equivalent to a finite automaton, it is possible to learn some regular expressions by a program. Kearns and Valiant show some cases where it is not possible to learn a finite automaton. A related problem is learning ...


16

As you says in question: I know that to convert a DFA, M to the complement, M`, I just need to swap the initial accepting states and final accepting states. Its not complement, but you are doing something like reverse of a language and regular languages are closure under reversal. Reversal of DFA What is the Reversal Language ? The ...


15

Its clearly a case of a finite-state-machine but its better to combine the conditions rather than create a new condition for each combination. I didn't like the Java example for State pattern on Wikipedia as states know about other states which wouldn't make sense in a lot of scenarios. A transition table that keeps a track of the from state, applicable ...


13

Automatons are really useful. I completed my degree in software engineering and computer science nearly 20 years ago. One of the first courses was Models of Machines, which covered FSAs, and ventured a bit into turning machines, computability, halting problem etc. Everyone thought the course was either boring, irrelevant, too difficult or pointless. The ...


12

This sounds like the typical use for a finite state machine in short, the state machine describes the various states in which your system can be, and under which conditions it can go from state to state. A state machine is described exactly as your English description. And it can be formally described using state diagrams in code you could make a state ...


10

Yes, it turns out this does exist; what is required is what is known academically as a DFA Learning algorithm, examples of which include: Angluin's L* L* (adding counter-examples to columns) Kearns / Vazirani Rivest / Schapire NL* Regular positive negative inference (RPNI) DeLeTe2 Biermann & Feldman's algorithm Biermann & Feldman's algorithm (using ...


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Disclaimer: Your question is very general, hence so is this answer. Note that I'm anything but an expert on TMs, and this approach will usually not be very efficient (I can't even promise it will always be effective). I'm just jotting down some thoughts here. I would suggest trying an approach like this: Take your pseudo-code and reduce it so that it only ...


8

Build FAs A and B for both languages, and construct the "intersection FA" AnB. If AnB has at least one accepting state accessible from the start state, then there is a word that is in both languages. Constructing AnB could be tricky, but I'm sure there are FA textbooks that cover it. The approach I would take is: The states of AnB is the cartesian ...


8

Change A+B to grammar G -> A G -> B Change A* to G -> (empty) G -> A G Change AB to G -> AB and proceed recursively on A and B. Base cases are empty language (no productions) and a single symbol. In your case A -> 01 A -> 10B B -> (empty) B -> 11B If the language is described by finite automaton: use states as ...


8

Take a look at my series of posts about this subject: Regular Expression Engine in C# (the Story) Regex engine in C# - the Regex Parser Regex engine in C# - the NFA Regex engine in C# - the DFA Regex engine in C# - matching strings


8

Yes, it's certainly "possible"; Here's the pseudo-code: string MakeRegexFromExamples(<listOfPosExamples>, <listOfNegExamples>) { if HasIntersection(<listOfPosExamples>, <listOfNegExamples>) return <IntersectionError> string regex = ""; foreach(string example in <listOfPosExamples>) { if(regex != ...


7

Use a definite clause grammar. s(_, _) --> []. s(A, B) --> [A], s(A, B), [B]. Demo: ?- phrase(s(1, 2), X). X = [] ; X = [1, 2] ; X = [1, 1, 2, 2] ; X = [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2] .


6

So this is the best curriculum I can come with : For Beginners in Logic : Peter J. Cameron, Sets, Logic and Categories, Springer, Springer Undergraduate Mathematics Series, 1999, URL. James L. Hein, Discrete Structures, Logic, and Computability, Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2009 (3th ed) URL. Logic for the computer scientist. For Beginners in ...


6

Edit: Updated to include start states and fixes, as per below comments.


6

Edit: I was totally leading you down the wrong track. That's what happens when I try to help out when I haven't completely solved the problem myself. Ogden's Lemma Suppose L is context free. By Ogden's lemma, there exists an integer p that has the following properties: Given a string w in L at least p symbols long, where at least p of those symbols are ...


6

JGraph is a library you can use that is native to Java and fairly easy to use, or you can generate a .dot file and let GraphViz take care of it for you.


6

The main idea of the pumping lemma is to tell you that when you have a regular language L with infinite number of terms, then there is a size S and an infinite subset X of terms T in language L with length(T) > S for all T in X such that all the terms in X will contain the same pattern P inside them. Intuitively, each term in the set X will repeat the ...


5

The answer is simple: don't use regexes. Use this approach: iterate over each letter (of course, skip the last tree letters) iterate over the next three letters and check for ascending order if they all were ascending return true. iterate over the next three letters and check for descending order if they all were descending return false. return ...


5

Yes, context-sensitive grammars (CSG) are powerful enough to make undefined/undeclared/unbound variables check, but unfortunately we don't know any efficient algorithm to parse strings of CSG. A real example of a context-sensitive language is the C programming language. A feature like declare variables first and then use them later make C-language a ...


5

A PDA with a stack limited to containing 20 items is equivalent to a DFA. Here's the proof. Take any PDA-20, and you can make it into an equivalent DFA. Let's say the stack alphabet S where |S| = N. You also have the bottom-of-stack symbol Z. We imagine an additional symbol, -, which we can also have on the stack, which stands for "unused". The stack is ...


5

Here's the regex you're looking for: &([^;\\W]*([^;\\w]|$)), and the corresponding replacement string would be &amp;$1. It matches on &, followed by zero or more non-semicolons or word breaks (it needs to allow zero to match the stand-alone ampersand), followed by a word break that is not a semicolon (or a line end). The capturing group allows ...


5

Automata and formal languages are foundation of regular expressions, parsers, compilers, virtual machines, etc. which improve regularly. There are also required in the domain of theorem prover for program checking, which aims to prove that a program or a protocol achieves what it pretends to do. This domain is critical (vote machine software, banking ...


5

None. Level 1 includes Level 2. Maybe I misunderstood you, so to be complete: Regular Languages are used within Regular Expression Matching. Colloquial: DFAs can not count. And you need to count if you want to match brackets. [Level 3] Language Syntax is normally a Context Free Language. See 2) [Level 2] Context Sensitive Language are used only ...


5

Seems like it should be like: A->aAc | aBc | ac | epsilon B->bBc | bc | epsilon You need to force C'c to be counted during construction process. In order to show it's context-free, I would consider to use Pump Lemma.


4

I think you could parse the regular expression and define some recursive function which operates on the parsed regular expression in a left-to-right-manner, building up such a set of firsts. Some things are simple: Sequence: first(r1r2) = first(r1) + ( if '' in first(r1) first(r2) else empty set ) Alternation: first(r1|r2) = first(r1) + first(r2) ...


4

I believe the term is "induction". You want to induce a regular grammar. I don't think it is possible with a finite set of examples (positive or negative). But, if I recall correctly, it can be done if there is an Oracle which can be consulted. (Basically you'd have to let the program ask the user yes/no questions until it was content.)



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