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3

You have two buttons with given xpath on this page, first is not visible, thats why you are getting ElementNotVisibleException One is under <div class="loginPopup"> Second (the one you need) is under <div class="page"> So change your xpath to look like this, and it will fix your problem: ...


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There is a --subnet SUBNET_ID flag for knife ec2 command. You can specify which subnet of VPC you want the instance be created using this flag. Refer: https://docs.chef.io/plugin_knife_ec2.html You cannot provide VPC identity. However, you can provide subnet identity which eventually will create the instance in your VPC of choice.


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There are even 3 elements with id="_loginButton" on the page, and only one is visible - the one located inside the login form, you can get it by a CSS selector: By.cssSelector("form#_loginForm div#_loginButton")


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snippets are like the built-in :abbreviate on steroids, usually with parameter insertions, mirroring, and multiple stops inside them. One of the first, very famous (and still widely used) Vim plugins is snipMate (inspired by the TextMate editor); unfortunately, it's not maintained any more; though there is a fork. A modern alternative (that requires Python ...


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Use css [class='add'][ng-click='btnAdd()'] xpath is also another option //div[contains(.,'Add an Honor or Award')] Or, //div[@class='add']


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Will need more detail, show the code snippet please!


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You can try this: assertTrue(solo.getCurrentActivity().getResources().getDrawable(R.drawable.logo).isVisible()); For more: http://stackoverflow.com/a/26114862


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There are 3 occurrences of id="_loginButton". Used the id="_loginButton" under class="signIn" by cssSelector to get the exact button in the page. By.cssSelector("div.signIn div#_loginButton")


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You can do the check on each page load. And if you expect a user to stay on the same page for a long time, you can setup a timer (setInterval in JS) that will make an ajax request to check if there is a task to display


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The answer is most likely yes. Why "most likely"? Well. Mathematically, an FSA is a 5-tuple (Sigma, S, s0, delta, F), where Sigma is the alphabet, S is the set of states, s0 is the initial state, delta is the state-transition function, F is the set of accepting states. Since you fixed Sigma, there are only four places where it can go wrong. If you ...



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