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39

When an object is "double-freed", the most common cause is that you're (unnecessarily) releasing an autoreleased object, and it is later autoreleased when the containing autorelease pool is emptied. I've found that the best way to track down the extra release is to use the NSZombieEnabled environment variable for the affected executable in Xcode. For a ...


32

The @autoreleasepool statement is doing the same job as before, instead of using the NSAutoreleasePool class. The way the NSAutoreleasePool worked was a bit weird, as creating it caused an effect throughout the whole application; @autoreleasepool creates a scoped area and makes it clearer what's within the pool and when it drains (when it goes out of scope). ...


28

You'll find out what the object is when you break in the debugger. Just look up the call stack and you will find where you free it. That will tell you which object it is. The easiest way to set the breakpoint is to: Go to Run -> Show -> Breakpoints (ALT-Command-B) Scroll to the bottom of the list and add the symbol malloc_error_break


25

Note that the comments on oxigen's answer saying that -drain does not release the NSAutoreleasePool are not correct. The documentation for NSAutoreleasePool clearly says that -drain releases (and thus destroys) the NSAutoreleasePool. -drain is a replacement for using -release for NSAutoreleasePool objects, the only difference being that provides a hint to ...


24

Unfortunately, Apple does not provide any easy ways of putting values into an NSDecimal struct. The struct definition itself can be found in the NSDecimal.h header: typedef struct { signed int _exponent:8; unsigned int _length:4; // length == 0 && isNegative -> NaN unsigned int _isNegative:1; unsigned int _isCompact:1; ...


20

Basically, if you init, copy, or retain an object you are responsible for releasing it. If you don't, you are not responsible for releasing it. https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MemoryMgmt/Articles/MemoryMgmt.html Many classes provide methods of the form +className... that you can use to obtain a new instance of ...


20

The autorelease pool is typically released after each iteration of the run loop. Roughly, every Cocoa and Cocoa Touch application is structured like this: Get the next message out of the queue Create an autorelease pool Dispatch the message (this is where your application does its work) Drain the autorelease pool What you describe is the expected ...


20

The NSString literal notation @"" gives you compile-time constant strings that reside in their own memory space and have constant addresses. Contrary to popular belief, the reason why you don't release literal strings is not because they are part of the autorelease pool. They aren't — instead, they spend the entire application's lifetime in that same memory ...


19

There is no equivalent in ARC, as you don't need to do it yourself. it will happen behind the scenes and you are not allowed to do it your self. You simply use - + (MyCustomClass*) myCustomClass { return [[MyCustomClass alloc] init]; } I suggest you to watch the ARC introduction in the 2011 WWDC as it very simple when you get it. Look here: ...


17

The author is trying to work around not understand memory management. He assumes that an object has a retain count that is increased by each retain and so tries to decrease it by calling that number of releases. Probably he has not implemented the "is also responsible to release it in the future." part of your understanding. However see many answers here ...


16

As with other performance optimizations, you should generally only add additional autorelease pools to your code if you notice high memory usage and profiling (using Instruments, for example) leads you to additional autorelease pools as a solution. That said, you can wrap code that creates a large number of temporary objects in a tight loop in an ...


16

Yes, your functions are valid, and return objects using correct Cocoa conventions for retain/release/autorelease/copy. To answer your question about what the runloop is, in your application's main() function, it invokes UIApplicationMain(). You can imagine UIApplicationMain looks something like this: void int UIApplicationMain (int argc, char *argv[], ...


15

Do Not Call -retainCount The number returned by retain count is the absolute retain count of the object. There may be many retains in play that you have no control over as they are implementation details of the frameworks. There are always better ways to validate your code's memory management. Retain counts should only be considered as deltas; if you ...


14

this is correct: self.annotation = [[[Annotation alloc] initWithCoordinate:location] autorelease]; because annotation property is declared as a retain property, so assigning to it will increment its retain count. you will also need, all the same, to release self.annotation in -dealloc. in short: init will set retain count to 1; assigning to ...


14

The Memory Management Programming Guide for Cocoa will soon be your best friend. In brief, object instances in Cocoa are memory managed using reference counting (unless, of course you're using garbage collection on OS X). An object indicates that it wants to 'retain' an ownership interest in an other instance--keep it from being deallocated--by sending it a ...


13

usually you would autorelease it -(NSThing*)myMethod{ NSThing *thing = [[NSthing alloc] init]; // do some stuff with the thing return [thing autorelease]; }


13

Set a breakpoint in malloc_error_break to debug. Do that and post the backtrace. Usually, this means that you corrupted memory, but it may also mean that you have an over-released object. Try Build and Analyze, too.


13

The first one is using ARC, which is implemented in iOS5 and above to handle memory management for you. On the second one, you're managing your own memory and creating an autorelease pool to handle every autorelease that happens inside your main function. So after reading a bit on what's new on Obj-C with iOS5 it appears that the: @autoreleasepool { ...


12

What you need to do is send the object a retain message. NSDictionary* last = [[arrHistory lastObject] retain]; [arrHistory removeLastObject]; Collections release objects once they are removed, which is why you need to send the retain message to take ownership of it.


12

Using autorelease is a way of saying, "Object, I don't want you anymore, but I'm going to pass you to somebody else who might want you, so don't vanish just yet." So the object will stick around long enough for you to return it from a method or give it to another object. When some code wants to keep the object around, it must claim ownership by retaining it. ...


12

Using release instead of autorelease can improve memory usage in tight spots (which is good on the iPhone), but it's not going to help at all with crashing if you're not following the retain / release rules. I would read a few tutorials on memory management in Obj-C if you're still a little hazy on what you should be doing, and then go after those crashes ...


12

When you call autorelease, you give ownership of the object to the current autorelease pool. The run loop creates a new autorelease pool before it dispatches an event (such as applicationDidFinishLaunching:) and destroys that pool when the event finishes. When you give ownership of your LoginViewController to the autorelease pool, it gets released just ...


11

(cannot accept your own answer?) Well, after all that, I did manage to find a reference from Apple Developer, added as a side-note near the bottom of the page: iPhone OS Note: Because on iPhone OS an application executes in a more memory-constrained environment, the use of autorelease pools is discouraged in methods or blocks of code (for ...


11

IMHO, which way is 'right' is a matter of preference. I don't disagree with the responders who advocate not using autorelease, but my preference is to use autorelease unless there is an overwhelmingly compelling reason not to. I'll list my reasons and you can decide whether or not their appropriate to your style of programming. As Chuck pointed out, there ...


11

The docs say: The runtime sends initialize to each class in a program exactly one time just before the class, or any class that inherits from it. The recommended approach is: + (void)initialize { if (self == [GHUnit class]) { /* put initialization code here */ } } Also note the following recommendation from the documentation: ...


11

Yes, because the name of the method: does not start with new does not start with alloc is not retain does not contain copy This is commonly known as the "NARC" rule, and is fully explained here: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MemoryMgmt/Articles/mmObjectOwnership.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/20000043-SW1


11

Let's go through your code line by line. - (NSArray*)test { NSData *data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL URLWithString:@"http://stackoverflow.com/"]]; This creates a data object. You don't own it, but it will stick around for the rest of the method's time. So far, so good. NSString *result = [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:[data bytes] ...


10

Number 2 is likely the best choice in most cases. Number 1 has the chance of losing the release at some point down the line, for whatever reason, but it does release the array immediately, which in memory-starved environments can be useful. Number 3 is basically a verbose equivalent of number 2, but it does come in handy if you want to use an initWith* ...


10

Oxigen is right, see the documentation for method drain of NSAutoreleasePool: In a reference-counted environment, releases and pops the receiver; in a garbage-collected environment, triggers garbage collection if the memory allocated since the last collection is greater than the current threshold.


10

From NSAutoreleasePool Class Reference: The Application Kit creates an autorelease pool on the main thread at the beginning of every cycle of the event loop, and drains it at the end, thereby releasing any autoreleased objects generated while processing an event.



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