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82

If you want an easy way to code parsers, or you are tight on space, you should hand-code a recursive descent parser; these are essentially LL(1) parsers. This is especially effective for languages which are as "simple" as Basic. (I did several of these back in the 70s!). The good news is these don't contain any library code; just what you write. They are ...


38

In the absence of any pre-existing unit test frameworks for Arduino, I have created ArduinoUnit. Here's a simple Arduino sketch demonstrating its use: #include <ArduinoUnit.h> // Create test suite TestSuite suite; void setup() { Serial.begin(9600); } // Create a test called 'addition' in the test suite test(addition) { assertEquals(3, 1 ...


37

Don't Run Unit Tests on the Arduino Device or Emulator The case against microcontroller Device/Emulator/Sim-based tests The purpose of unit testing is to test the quality of your own code. Unit tests should never test the functionality of factors outside of your control. Think about it this way: Even if you were to test functionality of the Arduino ...


35

I developed this answer after following a link from dmckee's answer, but it takes a different approach than his/her answer. Function Attributes documentation from GCC mentions: noinline This function attribute prevents a function from being considered for inlining. If the function does not have side-effects, there are optimizations other than ...


27

I've implemented a parser for a simple command language targeted for the ATmega328p. This chip has 32k ROM and only 2k RAM. The RAM is definitely the more important limitation -- if you aren't tied to a particular chip yet, pick one with as much RAM as possible. This will make your life much easier. At first I considered using flex/bison. I decided ...


25

gcc's -fshort-enums might be useful: Allocate to an "enum" type only as many bytes as it needs for the declared range of possible values. Specifically, the "enum" type will be equivalent to the smallest integer type which has enough room. In fact, here's a page with a lot of relevant information. I hope you come across many GCC switches you ...


20

If anywhere in the runtime of your program an object is created with a virtual function pointer not filled in, and when the corresponding function is called, you will be calling a 'pure virtual function'. The handler you describe should be defined in the default libraries that come with your development environment. If you happen to omit the default ...


19

Both crt0/crt1 do the same thing, basically do what is needed before calling main() (like initializing stack, setting irqs, etc.). You should link with one or the other but not both. They are not really libraries but really inline assembly code. As far as I understand, crt comes in two "flavors" crt1 is used on system that support constructors and ...


17

I have considerable success unit testing my PIC code by abstracting out the hardware access and mocking it in my tests. For example, I abstract PORTA with #define SetPortA(v) {PORTA = v;} Then SetPortA can easily be mocked, without adding overhead code in the PIC version. Once the hardware abstraction has been tested a while I soon find that generally ...


15

You can check RAM static usage using avr-size utility, as decribed in http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=62968, http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=82536, http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=95638, and http://letsmakerobots.com/node/27115 ...


10

Declare i and j variables as volatile. This will prevent compiler to optimize code involving these variables. unsigned volatile char i, j;


10

You can use GCC's constructor attribute to ensure that it gets called before main(): void Init(void) __attribute__((constructor)); void Init(void) { /* code */ } // This will always run before main()


10

It seems that emulino would do the job perfectly.


9

Explanation: As the error message suggests, the issue has to do with the relocation (of code) which causes some truncation to occur. The message comes from the linker which is trying to map pieces of code to appropriate locations in the program memory. When code is placed or moved to some location ("relocation") and this code is referred to from another ...


8

If you intended to simply increment i, then use either i = i + 1; or ++i; (or i++), but not both. The rules of C don't permit you to modify a variable twice before a single sequence point. Both the preincrement (++i) and the assignment (i =) modify the value of i.


8

That's a fun one. When you write : struct mystruct mystruct_array[COUNT]; You create a global array of mystruct structs, there are COUNT of them, and since you didn't initialize it, it'll be filled with zeros. When you then write: extern struct mystruct *mystruct_array; You tell the compiler that there's a variable called mystruct_array somewhere and ...


8

Take out the ##. That is for creating a new token from two tokens; but you are not doing that here, you do actually just want two tokens. Also you cannot use the same name for a variable as you do for the macro parameter. Another issue is that you can't put initializers inside the struct definition. So you'll have to modify the form of your macro, e.g.: ...


7

i can't make sense of your examples, but if you want to convert a string containing hexadecimal ascii characters to its byte value (e.g. so the string "56" becomes the byte 0x56, you can use this (which assumes your system is using ASCII) uint8_t* hex_decode(const char *in, size_t len,uint8_t *out) { unsigned int i, t, hn, ln; for (t = 0,i ...


7

I will just quote the documentation, since they put it better. Writing C++ You can write programs for the AVR platform in C++, if you included c++ in the enabled-languages during configuration of avr-gcc. Just about everything in the Writing C AVR programs section applies, so read that first. The major drawbacks of using C++ are: C++ ...


7

Since the AVR compiler is based on the gcc compiler, it is very likely to support the new keyword. What exactly is the error you're getting. I'm guessing it's a link/compiler error along the lines of an undefined function, namely, operator new. There is a difference between the new operator and operator new, the first is used to create objects and the latter ...


7

simavr is an AVR simulator using avr-gcc. It already supports a few ATTiny and ATMega microcontrollers, and - according to the author - it's easy to add some more. In the examples lies simduino, an Arduino emulator. It supports running the Arduino bootloader and can be programmed with avrdude through Socat (a modified Netcat).


7

You can use flex/bison on Linux with its native gcc to generate the code that you will then cross-compile with your AVR gcc for the embedded target.


7

I've found one workaround: rename all .cpp files to .c and define following compiler options: -x c++ -std=gnu++98.


7

__func__, __FUNCTION__ and __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ are not string literals, like __FILE__, but are created like static local char array variables to the function you are using them from. So, the PSTR() macro will fail since you cannot use an array variable to initialize another array variable like that. __func__ is described in C11, §6.4.2.2 ¶1: ...


7

((UINT8_MAX + 1) * 1024) may become 0, because UINT8_MAX + 1 is usually 256, and 256 * 1024 is 0 modulo 216. So if sizeof(int) == 2 on your achitecture, then you get 0. On the typical modern desktop architectures with GCC, sizeof(int) == 4, and you wouldn't get the division by 0. To fix it, replace 1024 with 1024UL. That will work, because unsigned long is ...


6

Your speed calculation timer and your PID loop timer should be the same thing - not separate. Do not waste time and resolution converting pulse count to speed in RPM; if the timer is accurately periodic - and it needs to be for a stable PID - then the pulse count is directly proportional to speed, and the PID does not care about the units - that can be ...


6

The easiest thing to do is to put them into a section that has a valid C identifier as it's name. For example, use: __attribute__((section("mystuff"))) and you'll have automagic variables __start_mystuff and __stop_mystuff which will give you the start and end addresses of the section which you can declare in your source as extern variables. EDIT: this ...


6

I work on the Fritzing team. Picaxe programming does work in Fritzing, but currently Arduino programming does not--the long story is that there is no easy shell command for launching the Arduino compiler and uploader. You can edit programs for the Arduino in Fritzing, but to run them you still have to use the Arduino IDE. We should make it clearer that ...


6

You can't directly do this using arrays, if you want each bitfield to be exactly 36 bits wide. Pointers must be aligned to byte boundaries, that's just the way pointers are. Since arrays function like pointers in most cases (with exceptions), this is just not possible with bitfields that contain a number of bits not evenly divisible by 8. (What would you ...



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