Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

gcc's -fshort-enums might be useful: Allocate to an "enum" type only as many bytes as it needs for the declared range of possible values. Specifically, the "enum" type will be equivalent to the smallest integer type which has enough room. In fact, here's a page with a lot of relevant information. I hope you come across many GCC switches you ...


16

Personally, I'd recommend an ARM Cortex-M3 based microcontroller. The higher-power ARM cores are extremely popular, and these low-power versions could very well take off in a space that is still littered with proprietary 8/16-bit cores. Here is a recent article on the subject: The ARM Cortex-M3 and the convergence of the MCU market. The Arduino is very ...


8

I will second the ARM Cortex-M3 or even ARM7 based. Since you mentioned I/O, I suggest trying different vendors. Some vendors make you do read-modify-writes to registers to change output values, others make it simpler without the read-modify-write but that method has its cons as well. go to sparkfun.com and look through the development boards. Olimex ...


5

You are trying to solve a problem that does not exist. Your question is tagged C. In C language enum types in value context are fully compatible with integral types and behave just like other integral types. When used in expressions, they are subjected to exactly the same integral promotions as other integral types. Once you take that into account, you ...


5

Given that you already have programming experience, you might want to consider getting an Arduino and wiping out the firmware to do your own stuff with AVR Studio + WinAVR. The Arduino gives you a good starting point in understanding the electronics side of it. Taking out the Arduino bootloader would give you better access to the Atmel's innards. To get at ...


3

I don't see why an enum wouldn't work. Comparisons to, and assignments from, an enum should all work fine with the default widening. Just be careful that your 8 bit values are signed correctly (I would think you would want unsigned extension). You will get 16-bit comparisons this way, I hope that won't be a performance problem (it shouldn't be, especially ...


3

ARM is the most widely used embedded architecture and covers an enormous range of devices from multiple vendors and a wide range of costs. That said there are significant differences between ARM7, 9, 11, and Cortex devices - especially Cortex. However if getting into embedded systems professionally is your aim, ARM experience will serve you well. 8 bit ...


2

Texas Instruments has released a very interesting development kit at a very low price: The eZ430-Chronos Development Tool contains an MSP430 with display and various sensors in a sports watch, including a usb debug programmer and a usb radio access point for 50$ There is also a wiki containing lots and lots of information. I have already created a ...


2

In AVR Studio 5 select the VAssistX menu and click on 'Enable/Disable Visual Assist X". This should turn on and off the feature.


1

When you say you've added the libraries to your project, do you mean you've added them to your compiler source directories, or added the library source files as "Existing Items" to the project itself? Undefined references usually appear because the source files haven't been added as links to the project. If they're not added so that they show up in the ...


1

Your first array is an array of uint16_t pointers, but it's pointing to uint8_t arrays. It should be something like this: uint8_t *lfoList [] = {lfo1,lfo2,lfo3,lfo4,lfo5,lfo6}; Your second array is also an array of pointers of the wrong type, but it also contains simple uint8_t instances which wouldn't work even if the type was correct. If it's just ...


1

if you want for example character 'a' as 65.0 in float then the way to do this is unsigned char c='a'; float f=(float)(c);//by explicit casting float fc=c;//compiler implicitly convert char into float. if you want for example character '9' as 9.0 in float then the way to do this is unsigned char c='9'; float f=(float)(c-'0');//by explicit casting float ...


1

For character array input you can use atof.


1

If one uses the latest avr-gcc toolchain available from Atmel, then AVR Studio 4 crashes when trying to load the .elf file. To fix this change the debug flags from avr-gcc to -gdwarf-2 -gstrict-dwarf. Then one can load and debug programs under AVR Studio 4 as normal.


1

If TCNT0 is within I/O space then you can use IN to retrieve its value, otherwise you will need to use LDS to load it from its memory address (which is usually offset by 0x20 from the I/O register location). in tmp,TCNT0


1

Each time the microcontroller starts up it is seeing exactly the same internal state as any other time it starts up. This means its output will always be the same regardless of any algorithm you might use. The only way to get it to produce different behaviour is to somehow modify its state at startup by introducing some external information or by storing ...


1

Well, I just got to build the package. The problem is that the original sources were configured to be built in AVR Studio v.4, and mine is v.5, so I had to convert them to my version. So, you can follow the instructions: Unzip the content of the AVR-USB-162-CDC.zip to a folder. Inside it you will see the folder Atmel. Move this folder to c:\Atmel (so you ...


1

I've only used one of those. The Freescale is a fine chip. I've used HC-something chips for years for little projects. The only caveat is that I wouldn't touch CodeWarrier embedded with a 10 foot pole. You can find little free C compilers and assemblers (I don't remember the name of the last one I used) that do the job just fine. Codewarrior was big and ...


1

Some recommend the ARM. I'd recommend it, not as a first platform to learn, but as a second platform. ARM is a bit complex as a platform to learn the low-level details of embedded, because its start-up code and initialisation requirements are more complicated than many other micros. But ARM is a big player in the embedded market, so well worth learning. So ...


1

This is kind of a hard question to answer as your ideal answer very much depends on what it is your interested in learning. If your goal is just to dive a little deeper into the inner workings of computing systems i would almost recommend you forgo the embedded route and pick up a book on writing a linux kernel module. Write something simple that reads a ...


1

It does matter, you need to gradually acquire experience starting with simpler systems. Note that by simpler I dont mean less powerful, I mean ease of use, ease of setup etc. In that vein I would recommend the following (I have no vested interest in a any of the products, I just found them the best): I've started using one of these (MBED developer board). ...


1

I use microchips PIC's, its what I started on, I mainly got going on it due to the 123 microcontroller projects for the evil genius book. I took a Microprocessors class at school for my degree and learned a bit about interrupts and timing and things, this helped a ton with my microcontrollers. I suppose some of the other programmers etc may be better/easier, ...


1

Microsoft's C compiler allows you to do something like this, but it's an extension (it's standard in C++0x): enum Foo : unsigned char { blah = 0, blargh = 1 }; Since you tagged GCC, I'm not entirely sure if the same thing is possible, but GCC might have an extension in gnu99 mode or something for it. Give it a whirl.


1

Double check that the jumpers on the programming board that you are using (if you are) are set correctly.


1

Well this is hardly the venue to trouble shoot different hardware issues. So if you think there is an issue with the programmer, contact www.robokits.com. I would start with contacting robokits. Since you can't even enter the programming mode, you can ignore your source code. You should be able to verify fuses/lock bits w/o programming any code into the ...


1

Whatever you do, make sure you get a good development environment. I am not a fan of Microchip's development tools even though I like their microcontrollers (I have been burned too many times by MPLAB + ICD, too much hassle and dysfunction). TI's 2800 series DSPs are pretty good and have an Eclipse-based C++ development environment which you can get into for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible