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11

One improvement would be to first compare a and b, and swap them if a<b: you should use as b the smaller of the two, so that you have the minimum number of cycles. Edit summary Trying to avoid conditional jumps, not successful optimization Interesting reshaping of the formula, but no gain Further reshaping, with promising implementation that should ...


8

Take out the ##. That is for creating a new token from two tokens; but you are not doing that here, you do actually just want two tokens. Also you cannot use the same name for a variable as you do for the macro parameter. Another issue is that you can't put initializers inside the struct definition. So you'll have to modify the form of your macro, e.g.: ...


4

The compiler might be able to produce shorter code by using the ternary operator to choose whether to add 'a' to your accumulator, depends upon cost of test and branch, and how your compiler generates code. Swap the arguments to reduce the loop count. uint16_t umul16_(uint16_t op1, uint16_t op2) { uint16_t accum=0; uint16_t a, b; a=op1; b=op2; ...


4

const char str[] PROGMEM = "Hello UART!\r\n"; should work. You're creating a non-const pointer to const data.


3

int is 16 bits on AVR. uint8_t getFlag(flag_t flag) { return ( (flags & (1L<<flag) ) !=0); } etc.


3

Well, mix of LUT and shift usually works Something along the line, multiplying 8 bit entities. Lets consider them made up of two quads uint4_t u1, l1, u2, l2; uint8_t a = 16*u1 + l1; uint8_t b = 16*u2 + l2; product = 256*u1*u2 + 16*u1*l2 + 16*u2*l1 + l1*l1; inline uint4_t hi( uint8_t v ) { return v >> 4; } inline uint4_t lo( uint8_t v ) { return v ...


2

You are attempting to store an unsigned char array into a signed char array. Either declare str as unsigned char: unsigned char str[100]; or cast str in the argument as unsigned char: snprintf((uint8_t*)str, 100, '%d in',rpm); In this case uint8_t and unsigned char are equivalent.


2

The chip you are using has 96kB of RAM and that is also the sum of your .bss and .data sections. This does not mean that all of your RAM is being used up, rather it is merely showing how the RAM is being allocated.


2

One approach is to unroll the loop. I don't have a compiler for the platform you're using so I can't look at the generated code, but an approach like this could help. The performance of this code is less data-dependent -- you go faster in the worst case by not checking to see if you're in the best case. Code size is a bit bigger but not the size of a lookup ...


2

I think what you are referring to has to do with programming the flash in the part, the flash that contains the firmware the part runs on. There are two big picture categories for programming that part. One is with the processor in the part stopped you program that part from some software outside the part, a host, a device programmer, whatever through ...


2

If your allegedly C++ compiler does not support operator new, you should be able to simply provide your own, either in the class or as a global definition. Here's a simple one from an article discussing operator new, slightly modified (and the same can be found in many other places, too): void* operator new(size_t sz) { void* mem = malloc(sz); if ...


1

Whether you can get away with your malloc()-reinterprete_cast<>-init() approach depends on whether you have virtual functions/inheritance. If there is nothing virtual in your class (it's a plain old datatype), your approach will work. However, if there is anything virtual in it, your approach will fail miserably: In these cases, C++ adds a v-table to ...


1

In C++, a const variable has internal linkage by default (as if it was static)—which normally means that each translation unit (each .cpp file) gets its own copy. This may very well be why you're seeing them multiple times. What you'd want to do is declare the variables as extern, and then define them in exactly one source file.


1

divide ADC value by 4, meaning to read in the ADC value into a register and then shift it 2 times to the right then make sure that you set it to 25 if the shifted result is < 25 EDIT if you want a non-linear response to your ADC reading you can create a 256 1024 byte table ... potentially starting with 25x "25" and then any function stepping up ...


1

That's what the carry flag is for. Add the lowest byte of each 32-bit number using the ADD instruction. That will place the carry (ninth bit) of the addition in the carry flag. Then you add each pair of higher bytes in turn using the ADC instruction. It will include the carry flag in the addition, and also put the next carry in it after the addition.


1

TCCR1B |= (0 << CS10); TCCR1B |= (0 << CS12); does not do what you are expecting. Since you are using "or" |, the value placed back is 0|1 which is 1, not 0 like you desire. The usual way to clear a bit is TCCR1B &= ~(1 << CS10); To clear two bits at once, use TCCR1B &= ~(1 << CS10 | 1 << CS12); As for ...


1

Yes, via the download link at the side of the page you linked to ( http://asf.atmel.com/docs/latest/download.html ) and clicking on the "Download" link for the ASF source code (not the tools).


1

This compiles fine for me: #define __SFR_OFFSET 0x00 #define _SFR_IO8(io_addr) ((io_addr) + __SFR_OFFSET) #define PORTC _SFR_IO8(0x08) class Temperatur { private: static const volatile uint8_t m_port; }; const volatile uint8_t Temperatur::m_port = PORTC; The only thing that I found you might be missing is the volatile keyword in the assignment.


1

From the ATmega328P datasheet, "Boot Loader Support" section, "Application and Boot Loader Flash Sections" subsection, "Application Section" subsubsection: ... the SPM instruction is disabled when executed from the Application section. Therefore there is no way to write to flash from the running program. Use an external memory device if you need to ...


1

It is a common scenario and really depends on how much processing time you require exactly for each task and how tight your timing restrictions are regarding the device communication. Thinks you should review/consider: You have to be able to write data faster to the external RAM than it is acquired -> How fast do you gather data? See that you spent as ...


1

This is a remark on the assembler code in AVR200b, as such it does not answer the question in not sticking to C++ or C. Only when @Antonio added his fifth edit I realised that he was tackling the very thing nagging me about mpy16u: avoidable shifting. After some half-arsed tinkering with Atmel Studio 6.2, I'm convinced table lookup in a tinyAVR sucks, big ...


1

Create a pool of fixed-size memory chunks. When you need any amount of memory, allocate one of the chunks from the pool and use the portion you need. When you're done with it, return the chunk to the pool. The pool will never fragment because the chunks are always the same size. And if any chunks are available then they're always the right size. ...



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