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0

You have over-complicated the issue. You have already turned the logarithmic problem into a linear one by defining a variable update rate rather than a variable PWM step - so you have essentially solved the problem, but not seen the simple arithmetic relationship. If you take the OCR0A vs delay points you have selected (25,30), (50,25), (128,17), it can ...


0

It sounds like you really want to use some linear function of a logarithm, but without the overhead of the floating point math library. A crude fixed point logarithm can be coded as uint_8 log2fix(uint_8 in) { if(in == 0) return 0; uint_8 out = 0; while(in > 0) { in = in >> 1; out++; } return out ...


2

The posted transfer function is quite linear. Suggest a linear delay calculation. delay = 32 - OCR0A/8; After accept edit Various look-up-tables lend themselves to a close fit simple equations (constructed to avoid intermediate values > 65535) such as BRIGHTNESS_60 = (((index*index)>>2 + 128)*index)>>8;


1

The scaling isn't quite logarithmic so simply using log() isn't enough. I have tackled this problem in the past by using a LUT with 18 entries and going an entire step at a time (i.e. the control variable varies from 0 to 17 and then is shoved through the LUT), but if finer control is required then having 52 or more is certainly doable. Make sure to put it ...


1

The IRremote library is interrupted driven. Where it appears clear that controller.iterate(); is blocking those interrupts, causing the timing of the irrecv interrupt. There are several forks of the IRremote, where the original is based on a periodic interrupt that polls the input pin. It has a config file that can adjust the period as to be more lossy, ...


0

Your main problem is that you have void *temp = 0; declared, and you try to write to a NULL pointer since you initialize it with void *temp = 0. Even if you don't initialize it, it wont work because it wouldn't be a valid pointer, so either you allocate memory with malloc and assign it to the void *temp pointer, or use a union this way union Type { ...


0

You will lose output compare 2A and possibly 1B, and the ability to use PB3 and PB5 as general outputs. Pin change interrupts will still be triggered, and the pins can always be queried for input.


6

With #define SCANS; I am not surprised that for (count=0; count<SCANS; count++){ breaks. It expands to for (count=0; count<;; count++){ which is an invalid expression. You probably want to #define SCANS 100 or some other number. Addendum: Do not use a semicolon in the macro. It will make SCANS expand to 8;, and you'll be left with for ...


0

#define _BV(bit) (1 << (bit)) #define _SFR_BYTE(sfr) _MMIO_BYTE(_SFR_ADDR(sfr)) The first one _BV, as an example, instead of writing 1<<0 in your code you can write just _BV(0). The second one _SFR_BYTE uses the _MMIO_BYTE macro to get the data from the register sfr which could be MCUCR or ADCSRA or any 8bit IO register. For more ...


2

You need to LD the value, perform the OR or AND necessary to manipulate the bits, and then ST the value back. Unless you need to only write a 1 in order to e.g. clear an interrupt. In that case you should just ST the appropriate value directly.


0

AVR doesn't have an exact equivalent, but ST and LD both have forms that post-increment or pre-decrement the index register being used. Combined with the fact that registers are directly accessible in the first 32 memory locations, the ARM instructions can be emulated to some degree.


0

I've managed to get the switches working by using interrupts: ISR(INT0_vect) { if (bit_is_set(PIND, PIND2)) { //PD2 OCR1A+=20; } else{} } ISR(INT1_vect) { if (bit_is_set(PIND, PIND3)) { //PD2 OCR1A-=20; } else{} } void initInterrupts(void) { EIMSK |= ((1 << INT0)|(1 << INT1)); ...


1

The constraint "I" requires a constant from 0 to 63. If you choose one of the higher ports, then the address (_SFR_IO_ADDR()) will be higher than 63. You could try changing the modifier to "M", which requires a constant fitting in 8 bits. I don't know if this will work, or why the author chose to use "I". If it works, you could send the author a bug ...


0

Sample code for easy setting baud_rate #define F_CPU 8000000UL // Chip CPU frequency here, prevents default 1MHz #define USART_BAUDRATE 19200UL // Baud_rate here, baudrates: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200, 230400, 460800, 921600 #define BAUD_PRESCALE (((F_CPU / (USART_BAUDRATE * 16UL))) - 1) #include <avr/io.h> ...


1

Because your program gets written into the flash (aka. program memory) you can only define data there. Of course you might have an initialization routine that copies a range of bytes from flash to sram, and your toolchain might even support such usage transparently. For example, the avr-gcc toolchain uses the .data section like that. Given this C code ...


0

I don't know which tool set you're using, but in the case of Microsoft / ARM / and many other tool sets combined with some type of exe2bin utility to generate rom images for embedded software, then using db, dw, dd, dq, is not an issue for data in SRAM. The generated code will include code that copies data from the ROM / EPROM / EEPROM / FLASH image into ...


0

I fixed the issue. My controller was acting strangely but for some reason rewriting the fuses fixed the problem.


1

since the task does require to actual calculate the sum the answer may be pretty easy: LDI R16, 55


0

Timer 0 is an 8-bit counter. Even with scaling by 64, with the clock running at 16 MHz and the time compare value set to 4, the LED will toggle every 4 milliseconds. I doubt you can see the toggling occurring well enough to determine that it is off more than it is on.


2

struct _SdSpiProtocol { void *spiHwInterface; euint8 (*spiHwInit)(void* spiHwInterface); euint8 (*spiSendByte)(void* spiHwInterface,euint8 data); }; typedef struct _SdSpiProtocol SdSpiProtocol; The spiHwInit member is a pointer to function taking a void * parameter and returning euint8. euint8 atmega_spi_init(atmegaSpiInterface *iface); ...


1

This line euint8 (*spiHwInit)(void* spiHwInterface); declares spiHwInit as a pointer to function. The "problematic" line sets that pointer to a concrete function sd_protocol.spiHwInit.


3

It is not a function call but a function pointer: How do function pointers in C work? And your line is cast from a specific function pointer to a void pointer.


0

I've created clang fork to add AVR support. Feel free to join it and contribute.


1

Its not UCSROA with the letter "O", it is UCSR0A with the number 0.


0

The two instructions together multiply the (16-bit) value in the Z pointer register by 2. But I can't see what that could be good for. Usually, you take an index value (into an array), multiply that by the size of the array elements (2 for example) and then add the result to the pointer to the first element of the array, like ldi r24, N ; Nth element of ...


0

The pair of LSL and ROL performs one-bit double byte value shifting. LSL shifts lower byte and passes the former most significant bit of this byte to C flag in SREG. Then, ROL shifts the high byte, shifting in the bit from C flag into the least significant bit. This method of shifting multibyte value is a widely used idiom and should be carefully remembered ...


0

I think sts EIFR, R16 should actually be out EIFR, R16. Then, you're configuring PORTD.2 (INT0) as an output, which causes it to become 0 and stay there. No edge, no INT0, no ADC trigger. If you have an external pull-up use ldi R16, 0x00 out DDRD, R16 out PIND, R16 To use the internal pull-up use ldi R16, 0x00 out DDRD, R16 ldi R16, ...


0

Depends on that value you wrote to the fuses. If you disabled your external reset pin (RSTDISBL) or the serial programming interface (SPIEN) you only can use "high voltage" (high means 12V :-) programming. You may look for a capable programmer (eg. AVR dragon). If you "just" screwed up the clock settings you can feed a clock signal to the XTAL1 pin and try ...


0

AVR devices with bootloader support have two sets of interrupt vectors, one for the bootloader (at the beginning of the bootloader section) and one for the regular firmware (at address 0). The BOOTRST fuse determines which reset vector is used by default, and IVSEL in MCUCR (or the equivalent in the device) determines which set is currently active. Note ...


0

The question here is a bit strange because the default behavior of interrupts is that new interrupts are disabled (as in won't fire) while an interrupt is being serviced. With regards to writing code that must not be interrupted I have generally found it enough to just use the atomic functionality in <util/atomic.h>. If this is not sufficient and you ...


0

It will work. Arduino is just a Library. If You look at source code the setup() and loop() funtions are inserted to int main(); The setup() just before infinite while(true) loop.


1

The assembler uses the correct encoding of a jump instruction that jumps to the label given as operand. That is after the instruction executes the value of PC will be equal to the address of the label. For the RJMP instruction this means that the assembler doesn't use the address of label directly in the encoded instruction, instead it encodes it as a ...


0

Labels appear in assembly code, but the assembly code must be turned into machine instructions to be run on the device. What this quote is saying is that as the assembly file is processed, the label in jmp instructions is replaced with the address of the instruction following the label. The address itself is discovered during the compilation process as the ...



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