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37

The behavior that you are seeing is the result of expensive state-switching. See page 102 of Agner Fog's manual: http://www.agner.org/optimize/microarchitecture.pdf Every time you improperly switch back and forth between SSE and AVX instructions, you will pay an extremely high (~70) cycle penalty. When you compile without /arch:AVX, VS2010 will generate ...


30

This is because VSQRTPS (AVX instruction) takes exactly twice as many cycles as SQRTPS (SSE instruction) on a Sandy Bridge processor. See Agner Fog's optimize guide: instruction tables, page 88. Instructions like square root and division don't benefit from AVX. On the other hand, additions, multiplications, etc., do.


29

Here are FLOPs counts for a number of recent processor microarchitectures and explanation how to achieve them: Intel Core 2 and Nehalem: 4 DP FLOPs/cycle: 2-wide SSE2 addition + 2-wide SSE2 multiplication 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide SSE addition + 4-wide SSE multiplication Intel Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge: 8 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide AVX addition + 4-wide AVX ...


23

Here's a snippet from one of my CPU dispatchers. First you need to access the CPUID instruction: #ifdef _WIN32 // Windows #define cpuid(info,x) __cpuidex(info,x,0) #else // GCC Inline Assembly void cpuid(int CPUInfo[4],int InfoType){ __asm__ __volatile__ ( "cpuid": "=a" (CPUInfo[0]), "=b" (CPUInfo[1]), "=c" ...


12

The compiler is not allowed to fuse a separated add and multiply unless you allow for a relaxed floating-point model. This is because an FMA has only one rounding, while an ADD + MUL has two. So the compiler will violate strict IEEE floating-point behavior by fusing. Even if you enable relaxed floating-point, the compiler might still choose not to fuse ...


11

Two points: First, You're making a lot of assumptions. Register spilling is pretty cheap on x86 CPUs (due to fast L1 caches and register shadowing and other tricks), and the 64-bit only registers are more costly to access (in terms of larger instructions), so it may just be that GCC's version is as fast, or faster, than the one you want. Second, GCC, like ...


11

Here's a translation of the assembler code given on an Intel blog: function isAvxSupported: Boolean; asm {$IFDEF CPUX86} push ebx {$ENDIF} {$IFDEF CPUX64} mov r10, rbx {$ENDIF} xor eax, eax cpuid cmp eax, 1 jb @not_supported mov eax, 1 cpuid and ecx, 018000000h cmp ecx, 018000000h jne @not_supported xor ecx, ...


11

The GNU assembler (GAS) is not supported in Mac OS X. In order to use AVX, I had to: Install GCC using MacPorts; Replace the native OS X assembler (/usr/bin/as) by a script which calls the clang assembler. Compile the program with the installed GCC (e.g. gcc-mp-4.7) The strange thing is that while the clang assembler supports AVX, the clang compiler ...


11

It sounds to me like you need to learn about parallel programming in general on the CPU. I started looking into this about 10 months ago before I ever used SSE, OpenMP, or intrinsics so let me give a brief summary of some important concepts I have learned and some useful resources. There are several parallel computing technologies that can be employed: ...


10

This operation is sometimes called "broadcasting". AVX has a bunch of instructions doing just that, these are vbroadcast128, vbroadcastsd and vbroadcastss. Since you want to broadcast a single single-precision floating-point value, you want the last of these: vbroadcastss ymm7, [eax]


10

This should do what you want: __m128 a = _mm_set_ps(1,2,3,4); __m128 b = _mm_set_ps(5,6,7,8); __m256 c = _mm256_castps128_ps256(a); c = _mm256_insertf128_ps(c,b,1); If the order is reversed from what you want, then just switch a and b. The intrinsic of interest is _mm256_insertf128_ps which will let you insert a 128-bit register into either lower or ...


10

The throughput for Haswell is lower for addition than for multiplication and FMA. There are two multiplication/FMA units, but only one f.p. add unit. If your code contains mainly additions then you have to replace the additions by FMA instructions with a multiplier of 1.0 to get the maximum throughput. The latency of FMA instructions on Haswell is 5 and the ...


10

A simpler solution that fixed this problem for me was adding -Wa,-q to the compiler flags. From the man pages for as (version 1.38): -q Use the clang(1) integrated assembler instead of the GNU based system assembler.


9

If you have two __m256d vectors x1 and x2 that each contain four doubles that you want to horizontally sum, you could do: __m256d x1, x2; // calculate 4 two-element horizontal sums: // lower 64 bits contain x1[0] + x1[1] // next 64 bits contain x2[0] + x2[1] // next 64 bits contain x1[2] + x1[3] // next 64 bits contain x2[2] + x2[3] __m256d sum = ...


9

No, there's no scenario in .NET where you can write machine code yourself. Code generation is entirely up to the just-in-time compiler. It is certainly capable of customizing its code generation based on the capabilities of the machine's processor. One of the big reasons why ngen.exe must always be run on the target machine. Whether the jitters in .NET ...


9

If you're working with floats, you generally want to use MOVMSKPS (and the corresponding AVX instruction VMOVMSKPS) instead of PMOVMSKB. That aside, yes, this is one standard way of doing this; you can also use PTEST (VPTEST) to directly update the condition flags based on the result of an SSE or AVX AND or ANDNOT.


8

If you use any AVX256 instruction, the "AVX upper state" becomes "dirty", which results in a large stall if you subsequently use SSE instructions (including scalar floating-point performed in the xmm registers). This is documented in the Intel Optimization Manual, which you can download for free (and is a must-read if you're doing this sort of work): ...


8

On current implementations, if (at least) the upper halves have been reset (VZEROUPPER or VZEROALL) there is no penalty for using legacy SSE instructions. As detailed on page 128 in Agner Fog: optimizing subroutines in assembly, using legacy SSE instructions while (some) upper halves are in use carries a performance penalty. This penalty is incurred once ...


8

There are no scatter instructions in AVX or AVX2. AVX2, however, supports gather instructions. Intel MIC (aka Xeon Phi, Knights Corner) does include scatter instructions, but it is a separate coprocessor, and it can not run normal x86-64 code.


8

Your code does all integer arithmetic; there are no integer operations in the AVX extension. They were added in AVX2, which you haven’t enabled. Before you go and rewrite all your code to use float or buy a processor with AVX2, I should point out that the array-of-structures memory layout you appear to be using defeats many auto-vectorizers, so it isn’t ...


8

The pow function is very general and it may not be visible to the compiler what it does (remember that it can compute things like pow(1.8, -3.19). So it might help to use only builtin operations, and not make function calls: for(size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) { float const x = v[i] - mean; ret += x * x; }


7

Besides masm, recent yasm and gas do support avx too, and so does the inline assembler of gcc.


7

You could try doing it with SSE, incrementing 4 elements per iteration. Warning: untested code follows... #include <stdint.h> #include <emmintrin.h> uint32_t bit_counter[64] __attribute__ ((aligned(16))); // make sure bit_counter array is 16 byte aligned for SSE void Count_SSE(uint64 bits) { const __m128i ...


7

I would use a 4*double multiplication, then a hadd (which unfortunately adds only 2*2 floats in the upper and lower half), extract the upper half (a shuffle should work equally, maybe faster) and add it to the lower half. The result is in the low 64 bit of dotproduct. __m256d xy = _mm256_mul_pd( x, y ); __m256d temp = _mm256_hadd_pd( xy, xy ); __m128d ...


7

All are correct. These types are extensions to C++, not built in (almost nothing built into C++ begins with underscores). Since they are extensions, the implementation is free to impose any restrictions on them it wants.


7

You certainly can do that. The C and C++ languages allow you do it. And it will most likely do what you want it to do. However, the fact that you're using AVX means you care about performance. So it might be useful to know that this is one of the most common (performance) traps that SSE programmers fall into. (and many don't notice) Problem 1: Current ...


7

okay I implemented a function that can shift left up to 16 byte. template <unsigned int N> __m256i _mm256_shift_left(__m256i a) { __m256i mask = _mm256_srli_si256( _mm256_permute2x128_si256(a, a, _MM_SHUFFLE(0,0,3,0)) , 16-N); return _mm256_or_si256(_mm256_slli_si256(a,N),mask); } Example: int main(int argc, char* argv[]) ...


6

Intel provides a AVX emulation header. I haven't tried it, but quoting the linked article "The AVX emulation header file uses intrinsics for the prior Intel instruction set extensions up to Intel SSE4.2. SSE4.2 support in your development environment as well as hardware is required in order to use the AVX emulation header file. To use simply have this file ...


6

Maybe you can do 8 at once, by taking 8 bits spaced 8 apart and keeping 8 uint64's for the counts. That's only 1 byte per single counter though, so you can only accumulate 255 invocations of count before you'd have to unpack those uint64's.


6

If you are interested in increasing square root performance, instead of VSQRTPS you can use VRSQRTPS and Newton-Raphson formula: x0 = vrsqrtps(a) x1 = 0.5 * x0 * (3 - (a * x0) * x0) VRSQRTPS itself doesn't benefit from AVX, but other calculations do. Use it if 23 bits of precision is enough for you.



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