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14

Executive summary: Different cache levels can sustain different peak bandwidths for the same basic workload, so having differently sized data-sets can greatly impact performance. Longer explanation: It's not very surprising considering that Haswell, according to this article for e.g. can sustain 2 loads and 1 store per cycle but that's only ...


12

It sounds to me like you need to learn about parallel programming in general on the CPU. I started looking into this about 10 months ago before I ever used SSE, OpenMP, or intrinsics so let me give a brief summary of some important concepts I have learned and some useful resources. There are several parallel computing technologies that can be employed: ...


8

There are no scatter instructions in AVX or AVX2. AVX2, however, supports gather instructions. Intel MIC (aka Xeon Phi, Knights Corner) does include scatter instructions, but it is a separate coprocessor, and it can not run normal x86-64 code.


7

okay I implemented a function that can shift left up to 16 byte. template <unsigned int N> __m256i _mm256_shift_left(__m256i a) { __m256i mask = _mm256_srli_si256( _mm256_permute2x128_si256(a, a, _MM_SHUFFLE(0,0,3,0)) , 16-N); return _mm256_or_si256(_mm256_slli_si256(a,N),mask); } Example: int main(int argc, char* argv[]) ...


6

I converted your code to more vanilla C++ (plain arrays, no vectors, etc), cleaned it up and tested it with auto-vectorization disabled and got reasonable results: #include <iostream> using namespace std; #include <sys/time.h> #include <cstdlib> #include <cstdint> #include <immintrin.h> inline double timestamp() { struct ...


6

I have implemented the above three approaches on a Haswell machine. Evgeny Kluev's approach is the fastest (1.07 s), followed by Jason R's (1.97 s) and Paul R's (2.44 s). The code below was compiled with -march=core-avx2 -O3 optimization flags. #include <immintrin.h> #include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp> //t_icc = 1.07 s //t_g++ ...


6

You can download the Intel SDE (Software Development Emulator) for free and use that - it works pretty well. Native instructions run at full speed - only your AVX2 instructions will be emulated. You'll need a compiler that supports AVX2 as well of course (gcc, clang, Intel ICC or failing that an up-to-date Visual Studio). One final word: I would strongly ...


5

As the other answer indicated, it is not possible to implement scatter for now, even on AVX2. However intel Optimization manual does provide us with a hand written version of scatter operation. It is on page 11-17 of Intel optimization manual 2013 version. Basically what do they do is they read the index everytime and store it into a general-purpose ...


5

To add two 128-bit numbers x and y to give z with SSE you can do it like this z = _mm_add_epi64(x,y); c = _mm_unpacklo_epi64(_mm_setzero_si128(), unsigned_lessthan(z,x)); z = _mm_sub_epi64(z,c); This is based on this link how-can-i-add-and-subtract-128-bit-integers-in-c-or-c. The function unsigned_lessthan is defined below. It's complicated without AMD ...


4

I did some benchmarking of the AVX gather instructions and it seems to be a fairly simple brute force implementation - even when the elements to be loaded are contiguous it seems that there is still one read cycle per element, so performance is really no better than just doing scalar loads.


4

Probably this variant will be faster /* byte_result_vec 000H 000G 000F 000E 000D 000C 000B 000A */ const __m256i shuffle_mask = _mm256_setr_epi8(0, 4, 8, 12, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, 0, 4, 8, 12, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1); /* abcdefgh 0000 0000 HGFE 0000 0000 0000 0000 DCBA ...


4

Gather instructions do not have any alignment requirements. So it would be too restrictive not to allow byte addressing. Other reason is consistency. With SIB addressing we obviously have byte address: MOV eax, [rcx + rdx * 2] Since VPGATHERDD is just a vectorized variant of this MOV instruction, we should not expect anything different with VSIB ...


4

I don't think you can do much better than 4 instructions: 2 shuffles and 2 comparisons. __m256d x = ...; // input __m128d y = _mm256_extractf128_pd(x, 1); // extract x[2], and x[3] __m128d m1 = _mm_max_pd(x, y); // m1[0] = max(x[0], x[2]), m1[1] = max(x[1], x[3]) __m128d m2 = _mm_permute_pd(m1, 1); // set m2[0] = m1[1], m2[1] = m1[0] __m128d m = ...


4

To compile for a target with AVX2, use -mavx2.


4

Your SSE implementation is fine but I suggest you use the _mm_slli_si128 implementation for both of the shifts - the casts make it look complicated but it really boils down to just one instruction for each shift. Your AVX2 implementation won't work unfortunately. Almost all AVX instructions are effectively just two SSE instructions in parallel operating on ...


4

It is hard to comment without knowing what code your compiler generates, but here are some things my compiler (gcc) has to say. typedef unsigned long long uint64_t; typedef uint64_t vec2 __attribute__((vector_size(8*sizeof(uint64_t)))); typedef uint64_t vec __attribute__((vector_size(4*sizeof(uint64_t)))); vec f(vec a,vec b){ vec i={7,5,3,1}; return ...


4

If I understand you question correctly, this is a simple 4x2 transpose (or 2x4 tranpose?). Here's a code that is working for me: #include <iostream> #include <immintrin.h> using namespace std; int main() { __m128i a = _mm_set_epi64x(1, 11); __m128i b = _mm_set_epi64x(2, 22); __m128i c = _mm_set_epi64x(3, 33); __m128i d = ...


4

If you're using AVX intrinsics, then you know you're using IEEE754 floats, because that's what AVX does. Some of the bitwise operations on floats that make sense are selecting, as in Jens' answer, though as of SSE4.1 we have blendvps and its relatives to do that in one instruction absolute value (mask away the sign) negate (xor with -0.0f) transfer sign ...


3

You can do a shift right with _mm256_permute_ps, _mm256_permute2f128_ps, and _mm256_blend_ps as follows: __m256 t0 = _mm256_permute_ps(x, 0x39); // [x4 x7 x6 x5 x0 x3 x2 x1] __m256 t1 = _mm256_permute2f128_ps(t0, t0, 0x81); // [ 0 0 0 0 x4 x7 x6 x5] __m256 y = _mm256_blend_ps(t0, t1, 0x88); // [ 0 x7 x6 x5 x4 x3 ...


3

The two source lines you pasted shouldn't, and on my machine don't, generate any vpslld or vpand instructions. Use the -S -g -fverbose-asm switches to ask for assembly source and try to find the matching source lines.


3

I'm not sure your question is entirely clear, but I think you're asking how much data can be transferred to or from L1 cache upon execution of a single x86 instruction? If so, it's kind of an ill posed question. The cache structure, and even caching as a concept are not part of the x86 specification. This means, that the answer depends entirely on the ...


3

Here's another implementation that might work on AVX2 since you had that tag on your question (it is untested since I don't have a Haswell machine). It is similar to Evgeny Kluev's answer, but it might take fewer instructions. It requires two constant __m256i masks, though. If you're doing this many times in a loop, then the overhead of setting up those ...


3

Here is an alternative to LUT or pdep instructions that might be more efficient: Copy your 32-bit mask to both low bytes of some ymm register and bytes 16..19 of the same register. You could use temporary array and _mm256_load_si256. Or you could move single copy of 32-bit mask to low bytes of some ymm register, then broadcast it with VPBROADCASTD ...


3

If you just want to do this at compile-time then you can do this: #ifdef __AVX2__ // AVX2 code #elif __SSE__ // SSE code #else // scalar code #endif Note that when you compile with gcc -mavx2 ... then __AVX2__ gets defined automatically. Similarly for __SSE__. (Note also that you can check what's pre-defined by your compiler for any given ...


3

On my machine (core i7-4900M), based on updated code from Paul R, with g++ 4.8.2with 100,000 iterations instead of 1000, I have the following results: g++ -Wall -mavx2 -O3 -std=c++11 test_avx.cpp && ./a.exe SSE took 508,029 us AVX took 1,308,075 us Normal took 297,017 us g++ -Wall -mavx2 -O3 -std=c++11 ...


3

No. There's no 64 x 64 -> 128 bit arithmetic as a vector instruction. Nor is there a vector mulhi type instruction (high word result of multiply). [V]PMULUDQ can do 32 x 32 -> 64 bit by only considering every second 32 bit unsigned element, or unsigned doubleword, as a source, and expanding each 64 bit result into two result elements combined as an unsigned ...


2

Sandy Bridge only has AVX support. You're out of luck there unless you buy a Haswell CPU. Bochs has support for AVX2 emulation since v2.5, but it will be much slower, you only can test the correctness of your code.


2

The only reasonably efficient way I can think of is with an 8 bit LUT: do 4 x 8 bit lookups and then load the results into a vector, e.g. static const uint64_t LUT[256] = { 0x0000000000000000ULL, ... 0xffffffffffffffffULL }; uint64_t amask[4] __attribute__ ((aligned(32))); uint32_t ...


2

What are you using palignr for? If it's only to handle data misalignment, simply use misaligned loads instead; they are generally "fast enough" on modern Intel ยต-architectures (and will save you a lot of code size). If you need palignr-like behavior for some other reason, you can simply take advantage of the unaligned load support to do it in a branch-free ...


2

Judging by the description in Intel's AVX programming reference document available here, it looks like the gather instructions use byte addressing. Specifically, see the following quotes from the description of the VPGATHERDD instruction (on page 389): DISP: optional 1, 2, 4 byte displacement; DATA_ADDR = BASE_ADDR + (SignExtend(VINDEX[i+31:i])*SCALE + ...



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