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16

Opsworks already has support for Ruby 2.0, it's just not exposed through the UI. However, you can easily enable it by simply passing in the following custom JSON { "opsworks" : { "ruby_version" : "2.0.0" } } That's it! No need to install any custom packages or anything.


14

I would like to know what are the advantages and disadvantages of using AWS OpsWorks vs AWS Beanstalk and AWS CLoudFormation? The answer is: it depends. AWS OpsWorks and AWS Beanstalk are (I've been told) simply different ways of managing your infrastructure, depending on how you think about it. CloudFormation is simply a way of templatizing your ...


13

sudo su deploy # switch to the app user cd /srv/www/myapp/current # your deploy dir might be different (check logs if unsure) RAILS_ENV=production bundle exec rails console


8

Before OpsWorks supports the Asset Pipeline out of the box, you could do this. Create a file deploy/before_symlink.rb with the following content in your rails application. run "cd #{release_path} && RAILS_ENV=production bundle exec rake assets:precompile" If you deploy your Rails application to a different environment, change the RAILS_ENV. If ...


6

This process is much simpler now. All you have to do is provide the required values per the Webhook, and it will be done for you. Steps : GitHub repository -> Settings Webhooks & Services AWS Opsworks Provide AWS::IAM keys, Stack and App ID , and branch you want to deploy. Be aware that by this process you deploy a specific app to ALL the layers ...


5

In Opsworks you can share "roles" of layers across a stack to use less resources by combining the specific jobs an underlying instance maybe doing. Layer Compatibility List (as long as security groups are properly set): HA Proxy : custom, db-master, and memcached. MySQL : custom, lb, memcached, monitoring-master, nodejs-app, php-app, rails-app, and web. ...


4

I know very little about OpsWorks and Chef, but here's what I did to get it working. First, I had to create a rails recipe that runs during the setup event to create the symlink directory for the assets. This sits in a public repo that OpsWorks can access. cookbooks/rails/recipes/symlink_assets.rb: node[:deploy].each do |application, deploy| ...


4

We have a whenever cookbook in our repo we use that you would be more than welcome to use here: https://github.com/freerunningtech/frt-opsworks-cookbooks. I assume you're familiar with adding custom cookbooks to your opsworks stacks. We generally run it on its own layer that also includes the rails cookbooks required for application deployment (while not ...


4

Amazon Opsworks does not support native Chef environments at this time. You can manually set the node's environment in a recipe: node.chef_environment = "environment_name" Since Opsworks does not persist data between Chef Client runs, you will need to include this recipe each time you run the cookbook. You can pull the value for "environment_name" from ...


4

Set ignore_failure true. This is a common attribute for all resources. git "#{current_release}/#{repo[:path]}" do repository repo[:repository] revision repo[:branch] action :sync ignore_failure true end


4

You will need to put the template into one of the following directories api/templates/default api/templates/amazon or api/templates/amazon-2013.09. If you want the same template files to work on any platform, then put the templates in the api/templates/default directory. Check out http://docs.opscode.com/essentials_cookbook_templates.html#file-specificity ...


3

Look also here: http://wojtek.ziniewi.cz/2013/06/10/custom-symlinks-in-amazon-opsworks-ror-application/ And always remember to examine your stack-json by logging into console of one of your opsworks servers and typing: opsworks-agent-cli get_json


3

I ended up using https://github.com/joeyAghion/opsworks_custom_env. It works pretty well.


3

I tried setting up a MongoDB 3-node replica set in OpsWorks a few months back. I will share a bit of my experience: 1) How to install a single MongoDB: It is possible and easy to install a single mongodb using the EDelight Chef MongoDB Cookbook. Just add it as a submodule in your custom opsworks chef repository. To get it to work create a custom layer and ...


3

Like @chris said, there is no way to change the key associated with the instance. You will need to launch a new one with the new key assigned to it. BUT If SSH access is what you need, don't bother trying to change or update the key associated with the instance. It has been a while since I stopped assigning keys to instances over allowing OpsWorks manage ...


3

OpsWorks now fully supports Ruby 2.0, in Layer settings you can specify the version of Rails, Bundler and Rubygems.


3

I know this is an older post, but I'm posting this in case this helps someone else. I found the easiest way actually was to use one of Chef's deploy hooks (http://docs.opscode.com/resource_deploy.html#deploy-phases). Add a directory called 'deploy' at the Rails project root. In it add a file called before_restart.rb, with the code: ...


3

it's usually under the user /srv/www/#{application_shortname}


3

You should be using Opsworks Instance Roles for your servers. This is the best security practice. ( link aws blog post It will also work with the route53 cookbook. Without specifying the authkey/secretkey pair, you will force the use of the instance profile access details.


3

Use a continuous integration service like CircleCi, Travis or your own setup Jenkins. On the Continuous integration service then Add a github post commit hook . Test / Build the binary Create the zip file as artifact At this point you can create an new version on Elastic Beanstalk using the AWS commandline and the zip file created from this version. ...


2

First of all, let me state that I've started looking into OpsWorks just about 2 weeks ago. So I'm far from being a pro. But here's my understanding how it works: We need to differentiate between instances that are instance store backed, and instances that are EBS backed: The instance store disappears together with the instance once it's shut down. ...


2

Try running: cd /opt/aws/opsworks/current bundle exec chef-solo -l debug -c conf/solo.rb -j /var/lib/aws/opsworks/chef/XXX.json


2

In my case, using m1.small, I followed this doc to create a custom AMI. I think the reason it kept booting forever is the opsworks-agent files are still there. See step 4 under To create a custom AMI from an AWS OpsWorks instance, you'd need to stop agent and delete it's files. The complete cycle improved from ~25 minutes down to ~10 minutes. By the ~11th ...


2

I used a slightly different approach, using OpsWorks hook to copy JSON to application.yml. you can read more about it here: http://zaman.io/how-to-import-aws-opsworks-json-into-rails-app/


2

Best Solution : Use Environment Values in Chef 11.10 stack. Opsworks Environment Variables Reference Alternative: This is not currently supported as an environment option by default. So you will need to add it in. I will assume you are using latest Chef 11.4 cookbooks . modify ( LINE 2 of ) : ...


2

I raised the issue with the AWS support and it turned out to be an issue with OpsWorks. One crucial thing for the bug to be reproducible is that I was rebooting the instance by typing sudo reboot on the command line. If I stop and restart the instance through the API or the AWS console instead, the volume gets correctly mounted. Quoting literally the AWS ...


2

We are using Opsworks with a lot of custom cookbooks, and vagrant as well. While the test-coverage is far from perfect, it works pretty smooth, adapting community cookbooks as well. Our cookbook repository is public: https://github.com/till/easybib-cookbooks The interesting bits of this repo are: We use a role-recipe as the entry point for each layer ...


2

The two main disadvantages of the 1st solution are: You'll be forced into session stickiness. You're coupling the app's and the cache's scaling events. While these may be a non issue in your case, generally I try to avoid them whenever possible because they tend to complicate matters in the long run.


2

I would relocate that part to a definition (or a provider). So basically split your recipe in two parts: recipes/deploy.rb: node[:deploy].each do |application, deploy| php_artisan_setup do dir "#{deploy[:deploy_to]}/current" end end definitions/php_artisan_setup.rb: define :php_artisan_setup do execute 'DB migrate then seed' do cwd ...


2

Another option outside of environment variables is you can generate a file with the variables in it at deploy time. For example, for a Rails app, the config/secrets.yml is a reasonable place to put these. I created a deploy/before_restart.rb deploy hook with the following content: def create_secrets(secrets, release_path) Chef::Log.info("Creating ...



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