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0

Once I worked in the project, I needed to capture the screen periodically. I created a simple bash file, which run this commnad among others (it was on mac): screencapture -t jpg -x ~/Desktop/Screens/asd.jpg But probably, better answer is here This is the code: Rectangle screenRect = new Rectangle(Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize()); ...


2

setLayout(new BorderLayout()); p = new Panel(); p.add(ta,BorderLayout.NORTH); p.add(tb, BorderLayout.CENTER); p.add(bb, BorderLayout.SOUTH); Calling setLayout on a different container won't change the layout manager for other containers, that would be annoying. Panel is using a FlowLayout by default. Instead, try using p = new Panel(new BorderLayout()) ...


2

The whole code is buggy.Read the Comments inline. 1.Idk why you are adding actionListener to the button 4 times(Keep one) 2.You have to have to change the actionPerformed1 to actionPerfromed as you are implementing the ActionListener and assigning this to button's ActionListener public TextArea ta = new TextArea(30, 140); TextArea tb = new TextArea(3, ...


-2

I prefer to use Swing because it's a lot easier to solve your problem. You only need to use setDoubleBuffered(true), see: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/javax/swing/JComponent.html If you want to stick with AWT, you need to override the update method to implement doublebuffer, see: ...


0

int dialogButton = JOptionPane.showConfirmDialog (null, "Are you sure?","WARNING",JOptionPane.YES_NO_OPTION); if(dialogButton == JOptionPane.YES_OPTION) { System.exit(0);}else {remove(dialogButton);} this is the correct!


3

I don't know where you got this code, but it is so wrong. I created a GUI that displays a blue background for 5 seconds, then changes the background to white. Here's the GUI. All Swing applications must start with a call to the SwingUtilities invokeLater method to put the creation and execution of Swing components on the Event Dispatch thread (EDT). ...


2

There are three main problems I can see. You're not calling super.paintComponent from your paintComponent method, this is going to cause some interesting, but nasty paint artefacts JPanel use a FlowLayout by default, where the JFrame uses a BorderLayout, this is further complicated by... You don't provide any sizing hints for the MyGUIObject class, so the ...


0

How about this: public class GUI_Test { public static void main(String[] args) { GUI_Test gui = new GUI_Test(); gui.tryBasic(); } public void tryBasic() { JFrame frame = createFrame(); JPanel panel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout()); JButton button = new JButton("This is a button"); JPanel ...


0

First of all, take a look at How to Use the System Tray and the JavaDocs for SystemTray which have a number of examples Basically, you're not adding your TrayIcon to anything Abbreviated example taken from SystemTray JavaDocs if (SystemTray.isSupported()) { SystemTray tray = SystemTray.getSystemTray(); Image image = ...; trayIcon = new ...


0

You could try impl_getCode() of the KeyCode. But be aware, that this is internal and most probably will change with Java 9. From the KeyCode class: /** * @treatAsPrivate implementation detail * @deprecated This is an internal API that is not intended for use and will be removed in the next version */ // SB-dependency: RT-22749 has been filed to track ...


0

There are a couple of problems with what you are doing. Firstly, you are calling t.start() every time the component is drawn. This is unnecessary. Instead of doing this, create a boolean value determining whether it is the first frame and start it then. Here is how you can do this: boolean firstFrame = true; @Override public void paintComponent(Graphics ...


2

It likely is happening, the TextAreabut the button has focus, so you never see it. If you tabbed over to the TextArea, you'd likely see all the text selected. what if you called public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { t.selectAll(); t.requestFocusInWindow(); } Question: why use the AWT library? It's about 20 years out of date.


2

Your error message is providing your with a good indication of what the problem is: JDisappearingFriends.java:8: error: JDisappearingFriends is not abstract and does not override abstract method actionPerformed(ActionEvent) in ActionListener actionPreformed is mispelled and should be actionPerformed You should also get use to using the @Override ...


3

Add something like this javax.swing.Timer timer=new javax.swing.Timer(100, panel) ; timer.start(); Each 100msec the timer invokes actionPerformed() method of your MyPanel class


4

You will want to read the tutorials and the API as they clearly spell out what setBounds and setLayout does, but briefly: The setLayout(...) method allows you to set the layout of the container, often a JPanel, to say FlowLayout, BorderLayout, GridLayout, null layout, or whatever layout desired. The layout manager helps lay out the components held by this ...


0

I concluded that AWT does not support - this questions identifies couple of ways to add chunks How can I save a PNG with a tEXt or iTXt chunk from Java? Here is what I propose to do - Use AWT / Graphics 2D to generate the .PNG Read PNG, refer to the link for details on how to do it Add the Chunks you want to add Write it(them) back to the .PNG


2

Random is a class used to generate random numbers - you need to use it by calling one of its nextWhatever methods: Random r = new Random(); jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(r.nextInt());


0

Probably error. In case of error sometimes eclipse didn't show error, but in result members aren't listed for auto complete.


1

Specify empty sun.java2d.fontpath property to prevent from loading system fonts. java -Dsun.java2d.fontpath= -jar YourApp


0

Its because there might be an ambiguity between the paintcomponent of AWT/Swing and the parameters that it needs consists of 1D and 2D graphics. You might have imported both of them.


1

You can use Graphics2D.drawImage(BufferedImage image, BufferedImageOp op, int x, int y) and a RescaleOp to alter the colours when drawing the image: g2.drawImage(image, new RescaleOp( new float[]{0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f, 1f}, // scale factors for red, green, blue, alpha new float[]{0, 0, 0, 0}, // offsets for red, green, blue, alpha null), ...


3

You're getting the NPE because the jb variable in your new EventHandling1 object is null since you never call go() on the new object (you do call it on the original, but that has no effect on the new one). Even if you get rid of the need to call go() say by folding all into the EventHandling1 constructor, you're still stuck up a tree, since the jb variable ...


0

Here's a simple Swing application that draws an image. You have to put the image in the same directory as the Java code. package com.ggl.testing; import java.awt.Dimension; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.Image; import java.io.IOException; import javax.imageio.ImageIO; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.JPanel; import ...


2

Avoid Applet, if you "really" have to, use JApplet instead. Having said that, you should start with JPanel and override it's paintComponent method instead (and make sure you call super.paintComponent before doing any custom painting. Take a look at Painting in AWT and Swing and Performing Custom Painting for more details. Generally speaking, painting in ...


1

Use ImageIO.read over Toolkit.getImage, it will throw a IOException of the image can't be load for some reason Check the location of the image. Your example is looking for a file in Koppenhagen\\Pictures, relative to the execution context of the program. You could use File#exists to check if the file actually exists where you think it is Don't load ...


0

Use a Panel and add that into the Frame and change background of the Panel. Please check the below code. Make sure you add the child components to the Panel. import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; public class StateWindow { private Frame MainFrame; private int bgcolor; StateWindow() { GraphicsDevice gd ...


2

The immediate problem you're having is the fact that you've added to components to the same position within a BorderLayout... frame.add(game); // Look and me, I'm in the CENTER frame.pack(); frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); frame.setResizable(false); frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null); frame.setVisible(true); but = new ...


2

I'd suggest to use Swing components instead: they provide much more flexibility: JMenuBar bar = new JMenuBar(); bar.setBackground(Color.RED); bar.setForeground(Color.BLUE); You should have no problems integrating Swing components with existing AWT components.


0

EDIT: I want to do it without using JFrames. Too bad. You're already using a JFrame, you just don't know it. Processing will create a JFrame for you, even though it's stored in a Frame variable. If you don't believe me, check out line 453 of PSurfaceAWT. That means you can use JFrame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DO_NOTHING_ON_CLOSE); to tell the ...


0

It is hard to give any thoughts (the piece of code is not short). On my system (Cinnamon 2.4.8) everything is painted pretty well. Anyway, adding super.paint() doesn't require much effort and will not harm anything. The following is interesting: you create your Frame directly in main() method. But nowadays Swing/AWT main frame should be created in event ...


0

You're breaking the paint chain, you should be calling super.paint, but in the case of the JPanel, you should be overriding paintComponent (and calling super.paintComponent before you do any custom painting) Take a look at Painting in AWT and Swing and Performing Custom Painting for more details


0

Well it turned out like this at the end, and it works fine. Thanks. private void jButton1ActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) { player = Integer.parseInt(jTextField3.getText()); guessIt++; if (player > compare) jTextField1.setText("Number is less than " + player); ...


4

My main recommendation: get rid of the while loop. This loop works with a linear console type program, but this is not how event-driven GUI's work, and that loop will tie up the Swing event thread, rendering your GUI frozen and useless. So, again, get rid of that loop, and instead change the state of a variable in this class based on user's response, and ...


3

The Mac OS X UI delegate for JTextField does not bind alt↑ to any Action. You are free to bind the combination to any action you choose. As shown in How to Use Key Bindings, the example below binds alt↑ to the existing "caret-begin-line" defined for JTextField, which moves the caret to the beginning of the line. final JTextField jtf = new ...


0

It's probably not the best idea to write everything in one class. You should definitely store your Filereader in another class. By the way, do not mix awt and Swing. Either use JApplet and JPanel or Applet and Panel. Why do you want to use borders? You can use Borders additionally, but that has nothing to do with your structure. Make a new JPanel where ...


1

Add a value to the Insets right property, which will add that number of pixels to the right side of the column. You could also use GridBagConstraints#anchor set to GridBagConstraints.WEST, which will force the components in the columns to be positioned on the left hand side of the "column", this ensures that when a component in the column is wider, they ...


0

After many attempts, i confermed with no doubt that the "GlassPane" is not the right solution for my app or any app like this. because: it can't be above a specific area or a component. it's usable only with the root pane.. The best way to read a PDF file is to convert it to image and then read it on a ImagePane. There's no need for OCR in this case.. ...


1

Also have a look at ShapeWriter provided by the JTS library. I used the following code snipped to convert jts geometry objects into an awt shape. import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.Shape; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.JPanel; import com.vividsolutions.jts.awt.ShapeWriter; import ...


0

use this code import java.awt.*; import javax.swing.*; class MyLayout extends JFrame { JPanel p1,p2; JTabbedPane jtp; public MyLayout() { setTitle("Tabed pane example"); setSize(750,400); setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); p1 = new JPanel(); p2 = new JPanel(); jtp = new ...


2

Either add the JTabbedPanes directly to the JSplitPane JSplitPane splitPane= new JSplitPane(JSplitPane.HORIZONTAL_SPLIT,true, EntryTabs, ViewTabs); Or change the layout managers for left and right to BorderLayout JPanel left = new JPanel(new BorderLayout()); JPanel right = new JPanel(new BorderLayout()); See How to Use BorderLayout for more details


2

You should declare your bt1 as instance variable Like that public class ColorChooser extends JFrame implements ActionListener { private JRadioButton bt1; ... }


1

declare bt1 outside of constructor JRadioButton bt1; then initialize inside constructor bt1 = new JRadioButton("Red"); the problem in your code is bt1 is not visible to outside of constructor.it's declared as a block variable.you should declare as instance varible [in class area]. example public class ColorChooser extends JFrame implements ...


0

Since I found lots of unanswered threads on this I'll share the solution. Turns out Windows 7 defaults Java to wm_gesture rather than wm_touch events so AWT does not get press events as expected. What you need to do is use JNA to register the window as a touch window (https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd317326(v=vs.85).aspx).


3

Here's the solution First you have to add mouselistener in label which should have mouse adapter in brackets its because you only want to use mouse click method. Than add mouseClicked method in it . and than add you code in mouseClicked method. Example: JLabel l = new JLabel("label"); l.addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() { public void ...


2

Instead of adding like that you can do something like for (String header : headers) { JLabel lbl = new JLabel(header); lbl.addMouseListener(add ur listner); add(lbl); } In the mouseClicked event you can get the JLabel and print its text as follows public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) { System.out.println(((JLabel) ...


1

Get a Graphics object from within the paint(Graphics) or paintComponent(Graphics) method of the custom painted component. That time (when requested to do so by the JVM) is the time that an AWT/Swing GUI should be painted. See Performing Custom Painting for more details and working source. General tips/questions. Why code an applet? If it is due to the ...


1

You have a very interesting question and a challenging project. This "answer" may provide some useful ideas, but it is not a finished solution. You could use the so called glass pane to draw on top of other components. The most important thing that I think you need to decide on is which libraries are optimal for your project. The iText library is very good ...


1

You declare Graphics g; and do not instantiate it. So you pass a null value to drawSegment(Graphics g) and try to call g.fillRect(xValue, yValue, size, size); on that null object. The java.awt.Graphics class you're using is just an abstract class. The object needs to be instantiated with some implementation - either by you or the framework. Since you're ...


1

How can I get the second one to show up on top of the other one? Their backgrounds should be transparent (I did not address this yet). You have answered your own question. You need to make the top component transparent. Don't use a Canvas for custom painting. Instead you can use a JPanel. Then you override the paintComponent(...) method to do the ...


0

I assume you mean the SWT / JFace AutoCompleteField (AWT is the old Java GUI). AutoCompleteField is only intended for the simplest use of the auto complete, for anything more complex you need to use the lower level classes. This is what AutoCompleteField sets up: Control control = your control IControlContentAdapter controlContentAdapter = your control ...



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