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65

You can create a big subplot that covers the two subplots and then set the common labels. import random import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = range(1, 101) y1 = [random.randint(1, 100) for _ in xrange(len(x))] y2 = [random.randint(1, 100) for _ in xrange(len(x))] fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) # The big subplot ax1 = fig.add_subplot(211) ...


24

You could always hide the axes which you do not need. For example, the following code turns of the 6-th axes completely: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt hf, ha = plt.subplots(3,2) ha[-1, -1].axis('off') plt.show() and results in the following figure: Alternatively, see the accepted answer to the question Hiding axis text in matplotlib plots for a way ...


23

You can have the axes handled automatically without you having to scale them yourself and keep autoscaling: set xrange [-10:10] set ytics 10 nomirror tc lt 1 set ylabel '2*x' tc lt 1 set y2tics 20 nomirror tc lt 2 set y2label '4*x' tc lt 2 plot 2*x linetype 1, 4*x linetype 2 axes x1y2


23

Use FINDALL: allAxesInFigure = findall(figureHandle,'type','axes'); If you want to get all axes handles anywhere in Matlab, you could do the following: allAxes = findall(0,'type','axes'); EDIT To answer the second part of your question: You can test for whether a list of handles are axes by getting the handles type property: isAxes = ...


22

Ploting axes on the right and top sides of a plot By default R will plot the x-axis below the plot area and the y-axis to the left of it. You can change this behaviour in this way: plot(1:100, cumsum(rnorm(100)), type="l", axes=FALSE) # Do not plot any axes axis(3) # Draw the x-axis above the plot area axis(4) # Draw the y-axis to the right of the plot ...


21

Calling p.plot after setting the limits is why it is rescaling. You are correct in that turning autoscaling off will get the right answer, but so will calling xlim() or ylim() after your plot command. I use this quite a lot to invert the x axis, I work in astronomy and we use a magnitude system which is backwards (ie. brighter stars have a smaller ...


21

I wrote a function very similar to plt.axes. You could use it for plotting yours sub-subplots. There is an example... import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np def add_subplot_axes(ax,rect,axisbg='w'): fig = plt.gcf() box = ax.get_position() width = box.width height = box.height inax_position = ...


16

Try: /ul/li[preceding-sibling::li='bob' and following-sibling::li='roger']


15

To reverse an axis, you can set the 'XDir' or 'YDir' property of the current axes to 'reverse': set(gca,'XDir','reverse'); %# This flips the x axis Keep in mind that flipping an axis in this way flips everything in the plot as well. This probably isn't what you want to do for the y axis. You probably just want to flip the y axis labels, which you can do ...


13

By default, axis() computes automatically the tick marks position, but you can define them manually with the at argument. So a workaround could be something like : curve(x^2, -5, 5, axes=FALSE) axis(1, pos=0, at=-5:5) axis(2, pos=0) Which gives : The problem is that you have to manually determine the position of each tick mark. A slightly better ...


13

Let's assume that you've plotted the image with handle imageHandle that: imageHandle = imshow(imageObj); You should assign the ButtonDownFcn to the image handle not the axes handle that: set(imageHandle,'ButtonDownFcn',@ImageClickCallback); and get the mouse coordinates from this function as follows: function ImageClickCallback ( objectHandle , ...


12

If you save a handle to the created graphics object, you can call DELETE on it to remove it from the plot: hLine = plot(...); %# Create a line with PLOT delete(hLine); %# ...and delete it Alternatively, if you didn't save the handle in a variable, you can search for it using FINDOBJ, then delete it when you find it. If you don't actually want to ...


12

To answer my own question, the trick is to turn auto scaling off... p.axis([0.0,600.0, 10000.0,20000.0]) ax = p.gca() ax.set_autoscale_on(False)


12

You can just set the width of the second subplot to the width of the first by changing the Position property. [x,y,z] = peaks(50); figure; ah1 = subplot(5,1,1:4); %# capture handle of first axes pcolor(x,y,z); shading flat; colorbar; ah2 = subplot(5,1,5); %# capture handle of second axes plot(x(end/2,:), z(end/2,:)); %# find current position ...


11

Use the 'Parent' property in calling the text command text(x,y,'text','Parent', Ax)


11

You could to do: //input[@name='q' and ancestor-or-self::*[@name='f']] // -- input element whose name='q' and who has an ancestor with the name='f' or //input[@name='q' and ../../../../../../*[@name='f']] // -- input element whose name='q' and who is 5 parents up with the name='f' You can use this desktop XPath Visualizer to test your XPath ...


10

axis ij just makes the y-axis increase downward instead of upward, right? If so, then matplotlib.axes.invert_yaxis() might be all you need -- but I can't test that right now. If that doesn't work, I found a mailing post suggesting that setp(gca(), 'ylim', reversed(getp(gca(), 'ylim'))) might do what you want to resemble axis ij.


10

Use the "get current axes" helper function: ax = plt.gca() Example: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib.finance quotes = [(1, 5, 6, 7, 4), (2, 6, 9, 9, 6), (3, 9, 8, 10, 8), (4, 8, 8, 9, 8), (5, 8, 11, 13, 7)] ax = plt.gca() h = matplotlib.finance.candlestick(ax, quotes) plt.show()


9

I think you are looking for this: require(ggplot2) df <- data.frame(x=seq(1, 1e9, length.out=100), y=sample(100)) # displays x-axis in scientific notation p <- ggplot(data = df, aes(x=x, y=y)) + geom_line() + geom_point() p # displays as you require require(scales) p + scale_x_continuous(labels = comma) # typo: label -> labels (corrected)


9

It is possible to set different ranges for y and y2 (the right axes), and even to set the color of the labels/tics independently. Then we simply divide the second function by 2 (or something appropriate) and set the colors... as in this example: set xrange [-10:10] set yrange [-20:20] set y2range [-40:40] set ytics 10 nomirror tc lt 1 set ylabel '2*x' tc ...


9

As documented here: plot {<ranges>} {<function> | {"<datafile>" {datafile-modifiers}}} {axes <axes>} {<title-spec>} {with <style>} {, {definitions,} <function> ...} you can see that the axes are used in the plot command. After setting the ranges of your y-axes with set yrange ...


9

To get the marker to show beyond the axes you can turn the clipping off. This can be done using the keyword argument in the plot command clip_on=False. For example: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt plt.plot(range(5), range(5), 'ro', markersize=20, clip_on=False, zorder=100) plt.show()


9

From linkaxes, the code you want is: ax = findobj(gcf,'type','axes','-not','Tag','legend','-not','Tag','Colorbar'); This will return the handles of all the data axes in the current figure.


8

Did you try something like : options(scipen=10000) before plotting ?


7

It appears that boxplot makes the axes grow wider, not sure why. In any case, saving the axes position right before plotting and resetting it right after seems to work for me: Z = normrnd(1,3,[100,1]); plot(handles.axes1, Z); pos = get(handles.axes2, 'position'); boxplot(handles.axes2,Z); set(handles.axes2, 'position', pos); Cheers, Giuseppe


7

Playing with ActionPostCallback and ActionPreCallback is certainly a solution, but probably not the most efficient one. One may use linkprop function to synchronize the camera position property. linkprop([h(1) h(2)], 'CameraPosition'); %h is the axes handle linkprop can synchronize any of graphical properties of two or more axes (2D or 3D). It can be seen ...


7

It looks like the labels are drawn but the blit command doesn't copy them over to the canvas because the bounding box only includes the inner part of the axes. For me changing update_line.background = canvas.copy_from_bbox(ax.bbox) to update_line.background = canvas.copy_from_bbox(ax.get_figure().bbox) and canvas.blit(ax.bbox) to canvas.blit(ax.clipbox) ...


7

By default, plot does show axes, unless you've modified some settings. Try the following hold on; % make sure no new plot window is created on every plot command axes(); % produce plot window with axes plot(% whatever your plot command is); plot([0 10], [0 0], 'k-'); % plot the horizontal line


7

AFAIK there isn't a LogLogLogPlot, so the next best thing would be to take the logs of your data and plot those. You then have to come up with Ticks of your own. A rough version: tks = {1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10000}; list = 10^RandomReal[{0, 4}, {100, 3}] ListPointPlot3D[Log[10, list]}, Ticks -> { {Log[10, ...


7

Try adding the following after your code for the figure (gca refers to the current axes): set(gca,'Layer','top')



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