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Such kind of operation better to perform with matrixes Calculating a LookAt matrix Than convert back to quaternion. If you want to perform it with quaternions, it can be done using 2 call to "shortest_arc" described http://lolengine.net/blog/2013/09/18/beautiful-maths-quaternion-from-vectors First call to rotate by DIR vector and second call to ...


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How about xyplot(values~date| ind, pippo, horizontal=F, layout= c(2,2), panel=panel.bwplot, box.width=20) Here we use xyplot with a custom panel= parameter rather than bwplot because bwplot converts the x to a factor first which renumbers all the levels with sequential integers; xyplot does not do this. If you wanted to label the exact dates, you ...


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I'll argue that the requirement of always having exactly five labels might be a showstopper. Most people will consider stepwidths following the pattern 1,2,5,10,20,50,100,200,500,… But if you do this in your case, you will often be dropping 4/10 of the labels while just introducing a single new one. So what I'd do instead is consider the stepwidths listed ...


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That's because you set the x and y ticks to the same thing. If you want different sizes, then you also need different ticks. You can't set both sets of ticks to the same major_ticks positions. Make one list of tick positions for the x axis and a separate list of tick positions for y axis and then set the ticks for each axis to the corresponding list.


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Not sure, but maybe something like: DT[, { x11(); plot(time, outcome, type="l", xaxt="n"); axis.POSIXct(1, at=time, format="%H"); NULL # let's not return anything, for cleaner output } , by=ID] ??


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Is it necessary that you use plot() inside of DT? If not, library(ggplot2) ggplot( data=DT, aes(x=time,y=outcome,color=factor(ID)))+ geom_point()+ geom_line() ## EDIT: How about this? DT[ , {plot( x=time,y=outcome, main=paste('ID: ', .BY), xaxt="n") axis.POSIXct( 1, at=seq( min(time),max(time),by="hour"), format="%H")}, ...


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Something like this: mydata = data.frame(q = seq(.25, .65, by=.05), response = rnorm(9)) ggplot(mydata, aes(y=response,x=q)) + geom_line(aes(y=response)) + scale_x_continuous(breaks=seq(.25, .65, .05), labels=sub("^(-?)0.", "\\1.", sprintf("%.2f", seq(.25, .65, .05))))


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If you have a specific set of colors that you want to use for you colormap, you can build it based on those. For example: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib.colors import LinearSegmentedColormap cmap = LinearSegmentedColormap.from_list('name', ['green', 'yellow', 'red']) # Generate some data similar to yours y, x = ...


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It's a little hard to tell from the code, but I believe this is because in OpenGL, the default forward vector of the camera is negative along the Z axis - yours is positive, which means you're looking at the model from the back. That would be why the X coordinate seems inverted.


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With plots it's very hard to reproduce results with out sample data. Here's a sample I'll use dd<-data.frame( saldt=seq(as.Date("1999-01-01"), as.Date("2014-01-10"), by="6 mon"), salpr = cumsum(rnorm(31)) ) A simple plot with with(dd, plot(saldt, salpr)) produces a few year marks If i wanted more control, I could use axis.Date as you alluded ...



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