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43

NO! Windows Azure Active Directory is NOT a Domain Controller. You can NOT join computers to Windows Azure AD. You can use it to sync on-premises AD with Windows Azure AD to easily enable Web SSO (Single Sign On). You can use to build enterprise grade web applications. You can read more about Windows Azure Active Directory here.


14

I was having the same problem after I built an Azure Virtual network with one VM being a Domain Controller and two other VMs being Servers. When I logged in to any of my Virtual Machine Windows Servers running on an Azure, I was unable to open web sites with any browser (tested Chrome and Internet Explorer). Confusingly, a few sites like BING and GOOGLE ...


11

If both the machines are in the same Virtual Network, then just turn off Windows Firewall and they will be able to ping each other. Other way is to just allow all incoming ICMP traffic in Windows Firewall with Advanced Settings. However there is a trick. Both the machines will see each other by IP Addresses, but there will be no name resolution in so ...


7

Let me add one more detail to the good hint from Martin Cox - the answer is correct - the issue with you r own AD/DNS server on your virtual network is really that your onw DNS is usually not fully configured to provide full DNS service, so browsing of internet fails to find all the "web content". So as proposed above you have to go to your azure virtual ...


6

Azure Connect is getting retired on July 3, 2013. You should make the transition to Windows Azure Virtual Network before then. You should now use the Point-to-Site VPN feature that was announced last week (April 26): https://azure.microsoft.com/documentation/articles/vpn-gateway-point-to-site-create/ With the Point-to-Site VPN feature of Virtual Network, ...


5

There is a big difference between both approaches: Service Bus is connectivity on application or messaging level. Here you will have two options: Service Bus Relay : here you have to expose a web service (that connects to your local database) over the Relay binding. This will make a publically reachable service in a firewall friendly way. This is mostly ...


5

When you create a virtual machine, you have to place it within a given cloud service (mycloudservicename.cloudapp.net). And multiple VM's may be placed in that cloud service. When creating the cloud service, you'll need to add it to a pre-defined virtual network. Once you do that, all VMs in the cloud service are automatically included in the VNet space. All ...


4

You need to add the <NetworkConfiguration> section to the .cscfg file for your worker role. It's not possible to add it using the portal. Here is a link describing the schema for the configuration you need to add. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/jj156091.aspx


3

We had the same problem around three months ago. Back then may be after some update, the new IP Addresses were not being assigned, or when role or vm were deleted their IP address were not reusable. We were not able to take help from Microsoft Support, as it was in Preview. What worked for us was: We deleted the whole virtual network, and created it again. ...


3

Generally speaking two options exist, you can read about these here - Windows Azure Connect let's you configure machine-to-machine VPN and is agent based Configuring a private network let's you create a site-to-site VPN, but it typically requires a VPN appliance. I've seen posts on the internet about people managing to configure their router as the VPN ...


3

Windows Azure now has a Virtual Network, announced as part of the Spring 2012 release. It lets you connect your on-premises network to Windows Azure via IPSEC, and takes advantage of your on-prem hardware VPN device. Summary information here, and tutorials here.


2

As your Linux VM was created first and Virtual Network (VNet) was created after, your Linux VM may not be able to see the Virtual Network.(This is a known issues with Linux VM) You can follow given steps to achieve your objective: Delete the current VM (this will still keep the VHD stored in Azure Storage) Now go to Virtual Machines > Disks, and find the ...


2

Affinity groups are an availability and scalability concept that is physically implemented within the fabric controller, and the Azure data centre, however they (Microsoft) sees fit. For example, affinity groups help scalability by co-locating services in the same rack (or switch, or something). Since there should be no availability and scalability ...


2

see similar thread: Azure VMs Virtual Network inter-communication you will have to configure your own DNS for name resolution.


2

I have now managed to reference the Virtual Machine running SQL Server with an internal IP 10.0.0.4 by first creating a Virtual Network in the Azure Portal and deploying a new VM to that network. With the web-role you cannot specify virtual network settings on provisioning through the portal. So to bring the web-role into the network you need to define this ...


2

Did you enable the endpoints for VM's in the portal? This is a simple operation as you just pick the port and the protocol. Here is an article that explains how: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/manage/windows/how-to-guides/setup-endpoints/ I would also recommend that you use the A record, mydomain.cloudapp.net, instead of the vip as the vip may change ...


2

In new SDK the template command are: azure vm disk upload “http://sourcestorage.blob.core.windows.net/vhds/sample.vhd” “http://destinationstorage.blob.core.windows.net/vhds/sample.vhd” “DESTINATIONSTORAGEACCOUNTKEY” Don't forget to make the VHDs "public" and get the KEY on "Managed Key" option on Portal.


2

Azure Blob Storage may be a good option. It's intra-datacentre and good for unstructured data such as files. http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/net/how-to-guides/blob-storage/


2

Your question is quite vague, in terms that it does describe the whole picture in the best possible way. Let me put my answer based on my understanding about your issue. First of all - Azure virtual Network is Virtual Network. It is designed to enable secure cross-premisses connectivity with Windows Azure Data Center. When you deploy a proper PaaS Cloud ...


2

Your extract shows the local network definition whilst your question seem to refer to the virtual network itself, but actually it doesn't really matter as the answer is the same - You can't change the address space for either on a created network. You will have to Export the configuration Make the changes you require (make sure to change subnets as ...


2

Setting up redundant virtual machines and using availability sets ensures that your service will remain online during maintenance operations by the fabric controller (like the one that occured this weekend).


2

This is now possible. Be sure to use the NEW Azure Portal. For details, check out: http://azure.microsoft.com/blog/2014/09/15/azure-websites-virtual-network-integration/


2

Thanks for posting here. I suggest you to follow this article which briefs about setting PIP to VMs. I tried assigning a PIP to my VM and it worked successfully. Please make sure to follow all the steps from beginning. It helps a lot. http://www.jonprocter.com/assign-a-public-ip-pip-to-an-azure-virtual-machine-vm/ Girish Prajwal


2

Your image will have to be available in the right region (its a pain, i know). So, if your Vnet is in East US, your image will have to reside in a storage account in that region.


2

Storage is not accessed via virtual networks. It's is accessed via its URI endpoint directly. You just access it from your app. If you cross region boundaries (e.g. running an app in one region, accessing storage in another region), you have to deal with latency, plus the cost of any outbound storage cost (for any data leaving the region).


1

When building a Virtual Network in Azure, it is created within a specific data center. If you take a look at the Virtual Network creation page (as illustrated in the doc you referenced), you'll see that you need to select the datacenter to associate the vnet with: You may then add any of your cloud services in that datacenter to that particular vnet. ...


1

Taking a guess that this is a point-to-site network (and it looks like one). If that's the case, you need to add the gateway subnet (you can see this in the portal, for point-to-site network configuration). You can add this from the Configure tab: scroll to the bottom and look at virtual network address spaces - you'll see a button to add the gateway ...


1

In my case, since our client installed SQL Server on the VM, using a named database instance, the service which hosted the instance I needed to connect to didn't have its TCP port set properly. So my detail that the SQL Server instance was named was indeed important. If you just cannot figure out why your Web Role (Cloud Service) just isn't connecting to ...


1

The Windows Azure Platform Training Kit has a hands-on lab in which a website is deployed into a PaaS cloud service and SQL Server is deployed into an IaaS cloud service. Both cloud services are in the same VNET - although not the same subnet - allowing the website to connect to SQL Server through the VNET NOT the public endpoint.



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