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98

While this.model.get("obj1").myAttribute1 is fine, it's a bit problematic because then you might be tempted to do the same type of thing for set, i.e. this.model.get("obj1").myAttribute1 = true; But if you do this, you won't get the benefits of Backbone models for myAttribute1, like change events or validation. A better solution would be to never nest ...


72

I have the very same issue while I'm writing my Backbone application. Having to deal with embedded/nested models. I did some tweaks that I thought was a quite elegant solution. Yes, you can modify the parse method to change a attributes around in the object, but all of that is actually pretty unmaintainable code IMO, and feels more of a hack than a ...


59

I created backbone-deep-model for this - just extend Backbone.DeepModel instead of Backbone.Model and you can then use paths to get/set nested model attributes. It maintains change events too. model.bind('change:user.name.first', function(){...}); model.set({'user.name.first': 'Eric'}); model.get('user.name.first'); //Eric


50

As of Backbone.js 0.9.0, the bind() function (which has been renamed to on()) supports a space-delimited list of events: model.on("change:title change:author", ...) // equivalent to model.bind("change:title change:author", ...)


30

If your view is only showing a single attribute - for example, if it's a checkbox showing some boolean attribute of your model - you should listen to the 'change:attribute_name' event for that attribute, as described in the Backbone docs. If your view is more complex and relies on multiple model attributes - for example if it's a view for "To Do" list item ...


24

This has confused me for some time as well. The reason is that {silent:true} does not mean "Do everything as normal, but just don't trigger the event". From various comments and answers by @jashkenas, what it seems to mean is "simply change the attribute value (and add it to the 'changedAttributes' hash), but defer all other "change-related" activities ...


21

I don't know if such a "bulk-bind" function exists (you could open a feature request for it, it seems useful). You can bind them separately: var Mine = Backbone.Model.extend({ initialize: function() { var listener = function() { console.log('changed'); }; this.bind("change:attribute_1", listener); this.bind("change:attribute_2", listener); ...


19

You're calling fetch on your model: var UserView = Backbone.View.extend({ model: userModel, initialize: function() { // ... this.model.fetch(); But you didn't give your model a url property: var UserModel = Backbobe.Model.extend({}); The fetch method talks to the server and it uses url to do so: url model.url() Returns ...


14

I'm posting this code as an example of Peter Lyon's suggestion to redefine parse. I had the same question and this worked for me (with a Rails backend). This code is written in Coffeescript. I made a few things explicit for people unfamiliar with it. class AppName.Collections.PostsCollection extends Backbone.Collection model: AppName.Models.Post ...


13

Domenic's solution will work however each new MyModel will point to the same instance of Obj. To avoid this, MyModel should look like: var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({ initialize: function() { myDefaults = { obj1: new Obj() } this.set(myDefaults); } }); See c3rin's answer @ http://stackoverflow.com/a/6364480/1072653 for ...


12

If your model is new, then at the time you save it it will fire a post method. If your model however is not new and you are updating it, it will fire a PUT. if this is not working for you it may be because your model does not have and Id property, in case you are using an Id with a diferent name, for example taskID, then in your model you have to set the ...


11

The problem is that you're using the parameters for unset incorrectly. "Silent" should be a part of an options hash, not a separate parameter. This works: model.unset("AttrName", { silent: true }); The reason for the strange behavior can be seen from the annotated source: unset: function(attr, options) { (options || (options = {})).unset = true; ...


11

When creating models for insertion in a collection, Backbone passes the future collection as an option to the model constructor which in turns forwards this option to parse. You could check this property and abort the parsing as needed: var Task = Backbone.Model.extend({ parse : function(response, options){ if (options.collection) return ...


10

You can provide your collections or models with a custom sync function which will be called instead of Backbone.sync when you fetch/update/destroy an element. You can then tailor the options to emit a request matching your server setup. For example, var M = Backbone.Model.extend({ sync: function(method, model, options) { options || (options = ...


10

I believe the changedAttributes function is what you're looking for changedAttributesmodel.changedAttributes([attributes]) Retrieve a hash of only the model's attributes that have changed. Optionally, an external attributes hash can be passed in, returning the attributes in that hash which differ from the model. This can be used to figure out ...


10

You can bind to change:name if you only want to notify if the name has changed: http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#Model-set


10

I'm not sure Backbone itself has a recommended way to do this. Does the Layout object have its own ID and record in the back end database? If so you can make it its own Model as you have. If not, you can just leave it as a nested document, just make sure you convert it to and from JSON properly in the save and parse methods. If you do end up taking an ...


8

Use Backbone.AssociatedModel from Backbone-associations : var Layout = Backbone.AssociatedModel.extend({ defaults : { x : 0, y : 0 } }); var Image = Backbone.AssociatedModel.extend({ relations : [ type: Backbone.One, key : 'layout', relatedModel : Layout ...


8

About the meaning of the doc you quoted: When you were doing (I guess the this.model( was an error) this.set({attr: value}, {silent: true}), all the change events were just delayed until the next non-silent change. That is, if you were doing this.trigger('change') (as of the last versions of jQuery/Backbone, this.change() doesn't work anymore) or ...


6

You can do it (I'm wondering why you didn't manage to do it). But you have to be careful: var array = this.get('attr_array'); array[1].state = 'active'; this.set('attr_array', array); What's the problem here? Your model holds a reference of the object. Therefore the last line is useless, it won't change anything at all. It's simply equivalent to: ...


5

I'd go with Option B if you want to keep things simple. Another good option would be to use Backbone-Relational. You'd just define something like: var Image = Backbone.Model.extend({ relations: [ { type: Backbone.HasOne, key: 'layout', relatedModel: 'Layout' } ] });


5

You need set the attributes first and then save. //Auxiliar function getFormData: function(form) { var self = this; var unindexed_array = form.serializeArray(); $.map(unindexed_array, function(n, i){ self.model.set({n['name']] : n['value']}); }); } Now this.model.save() works (saving on the server side). You can see it work in ...


5

I use Backbone DeepModel plugin for nested models and attributes. https://github.com/powmedia/backbone-deep-model You can bind to change events 'n levels deep. for example: model.on('change:example.nestedmodel.attribute', this.myFunction);


5

Looking into the backbone code, I realized my call to the create() function was incorrect. The success and error callbacks needed to be within the object being passed in as the second argument, and not as a third argument. The changed, and working snippet is this: var postCreationStatus = this.model.create(newPostModel, { wait : true, // waits for ...


5

You have to initialize your Model before you could access it : var person_view = Backbone.View.extend({ initialize: function() { this.model = new person(); }, output: function(){ console.log(this.model.get('names')) } });


5

I think the way is to override fetch, where you make the Ajax call to each of the APIs. Store the returned partial sets in a temporary array, and when all 4 are complete, create the collection using this.reset. (You could use JQuery's Deferred I suppose, or just keep an internal count of how many calls have returned.) Something like this: var Collection ...


5

Here is a working code. var MenuItems = Backbone.Collection.extend({ comparator: function (a, b) { if (a.get('name') < b.get('name')) { return -1; } else if (a.get('name') > b.get('name')) { return 1; } } }); Here is jsfiddle with output so you can compare http://jsfiddle.net/ek44Z/2/ The main ...


5

I had this same error and banged my head against it for quite a while because backbone is new to me and this was compounding a fetch issue. Anyhow, I eventually figured out that order matters. Doh! (Less obvious when using CoffeeScript and "class" statements I thinks.) With one of my models I was setting the Collection before the Model (thanks to bad ...


4

You can iterate over an object using a for ... in loop and then use toFixed to format the number: toHTML: function() { var attrs = { }, k; for(k in this.attributes) { attrs[k] = this.attributes[k]; if(k === 'amount') attrs[k] = attrs[k].toFixed(2); } return attrs; } Note that amount will come out as a string but ...


4

CoffeeScript version of rycfung's beautiful answer: class ImageModel extends Backbone.Model model: { layout: LayoutModel } parse: (response) => for propName,propModel of @model response[propName] = new propModel( response[propName], {parse:true, parentModel:this} ) return response Ain't that sweet? ;)



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