Hot answers tagged

31

http://francky.me/faqai.php#otherFAQs : Subject: What learning rate should be used for backprop? In standard backprop, too low a learning rate makes the network learn very slowly. Too high a learning rate makes the weights and objective function diverge, so there is no learning at all. If the objective function is quadratic, as in linear models, good ...


21

It would be wrong to say "Matlab is always faster than NumPy" or vice versa. Often their performance is comparable. When using NumPy, to get good performance you have to keep in mind that NumPy's speed comes from calling underlying functions written in C/C++/Fortran. It performs well when you apply those functions to whole arrays. In general, you get poorer ...


20

The tutorial you posted here is actually doing it wrong. I double checked it against Bishop's two standard books and two of my working implementations. I will point out below where exactly. An important thing to keep in mind is that you are always searching for derivatives of the error function with respect to a unit or weight. The former are the deltas, ...


15

The sigmoid function introduces non-linearity in the network. Without a non-linear activation function, the net can only learn functions which are linear combinations of its inputs. The result is called universal approximation theorem or Cybenko theorem, after the gentleman who proved it in 1989. Wikipedia is a good place to start, and it has a link to the ...


13

You seem to be a bit confused (I remember I was too) so I am going to simplify things for you. ;) Sample Neural Network Scenario Whenever you are given a task such as devising a neural network you are often also given a sample dataset to use for training purposes. Assuming a simple neural network system Y = W * X where Y is the output computed from ...


12

For handwritten character recognition you need many training examples (maybe you should create distortions of your training set) softmax activation function in the output layer cross entropy error function training with stochastic gradient descent a bias in each layer A good test problem is the handwritten digit data set MNIST. Here are papers that ...


10

Being a long time since I looked into multilayer perceptrons hence take this with a grain of salt. I'd rescale your problem domain to the [0,1] domain instead of [-1,1]. If you take a look at the logistic function graph: It generates values between [0,1]. I do not expect it to produce negative results. I might be wrong, tough. EDIT: You can actually ...


9

You probably want to follow Lectures 3 and 4 at http://www.ml-class.org. Professor Ng has solved this exact problem. He is classifying 10 digits (0...9). Some of the things that he did in the class that gets him to a 95% training accuracy are : Input Nueron : 400 (20x20) Hidden Layers : 2 Size of hidden layers : 25 Activation function : sigmoid Training ...


9

Yes, what you observe is true. I have similar observations when training neural networks using back propagations. For XOR problem, I used to set up a 2x20x2 network, logistic function takes 3000+ episodes to get below result: [0, 0] -> [0.049170633762142486] [0, 1] -> [0.947292007836417] [1, 0] -> [0.9451808598939389] [1, 1] -> ...


9

I wouldn't say it does automatic "unfolding" - rather, Theano has a notion of what variables are connected, and can pass updates along that chain. If this is what you mean by unfolding, then maybe we are talking about the same thing. I am stepping through this as well, but using Rasvan Pascanu's rnn.py code (from this thread) for reference. It seems much ...


9

At least on the surface of it, this appears to be a case of the so-called "vanishing gradient" problem. Activation functions Your neurons activate according to the logistic sigmoid function, f(x) = 1 / (1 + e^-x) : This activation function is used frequently because it has several nice properties. One of these nice properties is that the derivative of ...


8

First of all, thanks for providing so much information about your network! Here are a few pointers that should give you a clearer picture. You need to normalize your inputs. If one node sees a mean value of 100,000 and another just 0.5, you won't see an equal impact from the two inputs. Which is why you'll need to normalize them. Only 5 hidden neurons for ...


8

Back-propagation works in a logic very similar to that of feed-forward. The difference is the direction of data flow. In the feed-forward step, you have the inputs and the output observed from it. You can propagate the values forward to train the neurons ahead. In the back-propagation step, you cannot know the errors occurred in every neuron but the ones in ...


8

Let's consider a node in a back-propagation (BP) network. It has multiple inputs, and produces an output value. We want to use error-correction for training, so it will also update weights based on an error estimate for the node. Each node has a bias value, θ. You can think of this as a weight to an internal, constant 1.0 valued input. The activation is a ...


8

Doing something the way "it used to be" is not always the best idea. In general, if you do not have strong, analytical reasons to choose neural network you should not ever start with it. Neural networks are tricky to train, have huge number of hyperparameters, are non-deterministic and computationaly expensive. Always start with the simpliest model, and only ...


7

So what you are referring to is the two modes to perform gradient descent learning. In batch mode, changes to the weight matrix are accumulated over an entire presentation of the training data set (one 'epoch'); online training updates the weight after presentation of each vector comprising the training set. I believe the consensus is that online training ...


7

Check out my answer to this question: whats the diference between train, validation and test set, in neural networks? You should use 3 sets of data: Training Validation Testing The Validation data set tells you when you should stop (as I said in the other answer): The validation data set is used to minimize overfitting. You're not adjusting the ...


7

While I don't exactly understand your example, the question of backpropagation is fairly common. In the simplest case with strictly layered feed-forward and one output node: First you need to propagate the information forwards. It looks like you may have this already, however make sure you keep track of what the value at each node was after the squashing ...


7

The reason you need this is that you are calculating the derivative of the error function with respect to the neuron's inputs. When you take the derivative via the chain rule, you need to multiply by the derivative of the neuron's activation function (which happens to be a sigmoid) Here's the important maths (apologies for the formatting...): Calculate ...


7

The purpose of delta[j] = o * (1.0 - o) * (t - o); is to find the error of an output node in a backpropagation network. o represents the output of the node, t is the expected value of output for the node. The term, (o * (1.0 - o), is the derivative of a common transfer function used, the sigmoid function. (Other transfer functions are not uncommon, ...


6

I haven't looked at neural networks for the longest time (10 years+) but after I saw your question I thought I would have a quick scout about. I kept seeing the same figures all over the internet in relation to increase(a) and decrease(b) factor (1.2 & 0.5 respectively). I have managed to track these values down to Martin Riedmiller and Heinrich ...


6

I'm not sure what your question is but I actually went through that tutorial myself and I can assure you, other than a one obvious typo, there is nothing incorrect about it. I will make the assumption that your question is because you are confused about how the backpropagation hidden delta is derived. If this is indeed your question then please consider ...


6

The random weights given to a Neural Network often immediately restrict the portion of the search space that will be available during learning. This is particularly true when learning rates are small. However, in the XOR case (using a 3-3-1 topology) there should not be any local minima. My recommendation is that since the network is so tiny that you ...


6

A Feed-Forward Neural Network is a type of Neural Network architecture where the connections are "fed forward", i.e. do not form cycles (like in recurrent nets). The term "Feed forward" is also used when you input something at the input layer and it travels from input to hidden and from hidden to output layer. The values are "fed forward". Both of these ...


6

I think you train the NN in the wrong way. You have a loop over 10000 iterations and feed a new sample in each cycle. The NN will never get trained in this case. (the statement is wrong! See the update! ) What you need to do is to generate a large array of true samples Y = sin(X), give it to your network ONCE and iterate over the training set forwards and ...


5

Most of these questions are things that you need to try different options to see what works best. That is the problem with ANNs. There is no "best" way to do almost anything. You need to find out what works for your specific problem. Nevertheless, I will give my advice for your questions. 1) I prefer incremental learning. I think it is important for the ...


5

It's possible to create a neural network without a bias neuron... it would work just fine, but for more information I would recommend you see the answers to this question: Role of Bias in Neural Networks Update: the role of the bias neuron in the neural net that attempts to solve model XOR is to minimize the size of the neural net. Usually, for ...


5

Yes, neural networks can get stuck in local minima, depending on the error surface. However this abstract suggests that there are no local minima in the error surface of the XOR problem. However I cannot get to the full text, so I cannot verify what the authors did to proove this and how it applies to your problem. There also might be other factors leading ...


5

I found Rojas' book very helpful when I was trying to understand this material. I've included a URL at the end, but be warned, it's a big PDF of one chapter of his book. The high level description of what's going on is this: Backprop is trying to do a gradient descent on the error surface of the neural network, adjusting the weights with dynamic ...


5

Start with a larger range when initialising weights, including negative values. It is difficult for your code to "cross-over" between positive and negative weights, and you probably meant to put * 2 * epsilon_init - epsilon_init; when instead you put * 2 * epsilon_init * epsilon_init;. Fixing that may well fix your code. As a rule of thumb, I would do ...



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