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67

Something says me that you're trying to use Windows-like file system paths. If this is true, then it may be useful to know that you can also just use the forward slash as path separator in windows. As to your actual problem: the \ is an escape character in both the String and in regex. You need to re-escape it as well: string.replaceAll("\\\\", ...


42

My guess is that you are missing that backslash ('\') characters are escape characters in Java String literals. So when you want to use a '\' escape in a regex written as a Java String you need to escape it; e.g. Pattern.compile("\."); // Java syntax error // A regex that matches a (any) character Pattern.compile("."); // A regex that matches a ...


33

Quick Answer If you want to sidestep all this confusion, use the much less confusing block syntax. Here is an example that replaces each backslash with 2 backslashes: "some\\path".gsub('\\') { '\\\\' } Gruesome Details The problem is that when using sub (and gsub), without a block, ruby interprets special character sequences in the replacement ...


27

http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net/techblog/article/javascript_equivalent_for_phps_addslashes/ function addslashes( str ) { return (str + '').replace(/[\\"']/g, '\\$&').replace(/\u0000/g, '\\0'); }


26

Windows is the bastard child of operating systems in this regard, but a lot of APIs will accept forward slashes as well. On Windows, a file path looks like this: C:\Users\jsmith\Documents\file.txt On a Unix-like system (including Mac OS X and Linux), the same path would look like this: /home/jsmith/Documents/file.txt A URL, standardized in RFC 1738, ...


20

A variation of the function provided by Paolo Bergantino that works directly on String: String.prototype.addSlashes = function() { //no need to do (str+'') anymore because 'this' can only be a string return this.replace(/[\\"']/g, '\\$&').replace(/\u0000/g, '\\0'); } By adding the code above in your library you will be able to do: var test = ...


19

I suspect your string already actually only contains a single backslash, but you're looking at it in the debugger which is escaping it for you into a form which would be valid as a regular string literal in C#. If print it out in the console, or in a message box, does it show with two backslashes or one? If you actually want to replace a double backslash ...


19

From the C++ Standard: (C++11, 2.2p1) "Each instance of a backslash character (\) immediately followed by a new-line character is deleted, splicing physical source lines to form logical source lines. Only the last backslash on any physical source line shall be eligible for being part of such a splice." C says exactly the same: (C11, 5.1.1.2 ...


18

First of all, if you are trying to encode apostophes for querystrings, they need to be URLEncoded, not escaped with a leading backslash. For that use URLEncoder.encode(String, String) (BTW: the second argument should always be "UTF-8"). Secondly, if you want to replace all instances of apostophe with backslash apostrophe, you must escape the backslash in ...


16

There is a table listing all the escape codes and their meanings in the documentation. Escape Sequence Meaning Notes \xhh Character with hex value hh (4,5) Notes: 4. Unlike in Standard C, exactly two hex digits are required. 5. In a string literal, hexadecimal and octal escapes denote the byte with ...


14

The first one should be "\\\\", not "\\". It works like this: You have written "\\". This translates to the sequence \ in a string. The regex engine then reads this, which translates as backslash which isn't escaping anything, so it throws an error. With regex, it's much easier to use a "verbatim string". In this case the verbatim string would be @"\\". ...


13

Do not try to build pathnames concatenating strings. Use the Path.Combine method string path = Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.MyPictures); Console.WriteLine(Path.Combine(path, "test")); The Path class contains many useful static methods to handle strings that contains paths, filenames and extensions. This class is very useful to ...


12

The string doesn't contain a backslash, it contains the \s escape sequence. var str = "This is my \\string"; And if you want a regular expression, you should have a regular expression, not a string. var replaced = str.replace(/\\/, "\\\\");


12

To answer your question directly, put r in front of the string. final= path + r'\xulrunner.exe ' + path + r'\application.ini' But a better solution would be os.path.join: final = os.path.join(path, 'xulrunner.exe') + ' ' + \ os.path.join(path, 'application.ini') (the backslash there is escaping a newline, but you could put the whole thing on ...


12

Don't use String.replaceAll in this case - that's specified in terms of regular expressions, which means you'd need even more escaping. This should be fine: String escaped = original.replace("\\", "\\\\"); Note that the backslashes are doubled due to being in Java string literals - so the actual strings involved here are "single backslash" and "double ...


12

\ is an escape sequence character. Escape Sequence -- Represents \\ -- Backslash If you want to use it in your string, you should escape it with another \ character. string test = "\\test.xml"; or your can use verbatim string literal with @ character like; string test = @"\test.xml";


11

Most compilers are divided into parts: the compiler front-end is called a lexical analyzer or a scanner. This part of the compiler reads the actual characters and creates tokens. It has a state machine which decides, upon seeing an escape character, whether it is genuine (for example when it appears inside a string) or it modifies the next character. The ...


10

You need escape it. \t is an escape-sequence for Tabs 0x09. path + "\\test" or use: path + @"\test" Better yet, let Path.Combine do the dirty work for you: Path.Combine(path, "test"); Path resides in the System.IO namespace.


9

This is an issue because backslash (\) serves as an escape character for Regexps and Strings. You could do use the special variable \& to reduce the number backslashes in the gsub replacement string. foo.gsub(/\\/,'\&\&\&') #for some string foo replace each \ with \\\ EDIT: I should mention that the value of \& is from a Regexp match, ...


9

Double-quoted strings support the full range of escape sequences, as shown below: \a Bell/alert (0x07) \b Backspace (0x08) \e Escape (0x1b) \f Formford (0x0c) \n Newline (0x0a) \r Return (0x0d) \s Space (0x20) \t Tab (0x09) \v Vertical tab (0x0b) For single-quoted strings, two consecutive backslashes are replaced by a single backslash, and a backslash ...


9

Note that this answer was givin in the contect of ruby 1.9. As ruby 2.0 has a new regex engine it might not be valid in that context. This works: str.gsub!("\\", "\\\\\\") str.gsub!("\\", "\\\\\\\\") # also, will always work Edit: Explanation (via http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/143645 provided by @vache) Disclaimer: I'm not familiar with the ...


9

Use SqlParameter. string nameOfUser = @"Domain\userName"; scomm.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM tableOfUsers WHERE UserName=@username"; scomm.Parameters.Add("@username",SqlDbType.VarChar,30).Value=nameOfUser; //open the connection SqlDataReader sr=scomm.ExecuteReader(); if(sr.Read()) // use while loop when one or more exists { ...


9

You could put the left side of the assignment into parentheses: (subseq_id_to_intervals_dict, subseq_id_to_ccid_formats_dict, subseq_id_to_min_max_count_dict) = map_cases(opts, format_to_ccid_funcs, sys.stdin) The left side is already a tuple- the parentheses just ...


8

The reason for ths is a little peice of history. When UNIX was created, or should I rather say UNICS, they chose the / as separator for directories. Back in the days, storage media was rather small, and every directory in the root was another mounted storage device (/bin /lib etc.) When Microsoft release MS-DOS version 1.0, it did not have directory ...


8

You people! Yes, you can, and should, always use forward slashes. I think the issue is how to get there from here! If you have Perl installed, the following one liner will convert a C++ source file to use forward slashes, saving the original version in a file with extension .bak: perl -i.bak -pe "tr!\\!/! if /^\s*#\s*include\b/" myfile.cpp (The above ...


8

Just use this: <head> <link href='/include/style.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' /> <title>eLMS</title> </head> Or, if it is used locally: <head> <link href='../include/style.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' /> <title>eLMS</title> </head> The document root is for ...


8

Because you're using this inside of a regex -- you probably want quotemeta() or \Q and \E (see perldoc perlre) perl -E'say quotemeta( q[a/asf$#@ , d] )' # prints: a\/asf\$\#\@\ \,\ d # Or, with `\Q`, and `\E` $string =~ s/\Q$re\E/$rep/og; print $string."\n";


8

The reason is that in a C string literal (just like in Java or JavaScript), the backslash is an escape character and in Regex the backslash is an escape character as well. So to represent a regex as a string literal, you need double escaping. (That's why many "higher level" languages have regex literal notation, BTW.) The "\\" string literal represents ...


8

I'm not getting the behaviour you describe: >>> x = "\\\\\\\\" >>> print x \\\\ >>> y = x.replace('\\\\', '\\') >>> print y \\ When you see '\\\\' in your output, you're seeing twice as many slashes as there are in the string because each on is escaped. The code you wrote should work fine. Trying printing out the actual ...


8

The double backslash in the console you provide as input on runtime are really two backslashes. You simply wrote two times ASCII character backslash. The double backslash inside the string literal means only one backslash. Because you can't write a single backslash in the a string literal. Why? Because backslash is a special character that is used to ...



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