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107

This is similar to the Birthday Problem. Given a group of n people, What is the probability that two share the same birthday1? It's higher than you'd think. In your case, what are the odds that randomly picking a number between 0 and 1,073,741,823 n times will give you a duplicate? One approximation from the link above is 1-exp(-(n*n)/(2*d)). If ...


43

One hex character can only represent 16 different values, i.e. 4 bits. (16 = 24) 40 × 4 = 160. And no, you need much more than 5 characters in base-36. There are totally 2160 different SHA-1 hashes. 2160 = 1640, so this is another reason why we need 40 hex digits. But 2160 = 36160 log362 = 3630.9482..., so you still need 31 characters using ...


37

This is known as the Birthday Problem and is just basic probability-theory. The probability that N random numbers in the range 1 through K does not give a duplicate is: To calculate the chance of getting at least one duplicate subtract the value from 1. In your case it evaluates to P(40000, 1073741823) = 1 - p(40000, 1073741823) By using Wolfram ...


8

I started with the code provided by Dead account and made some changes based on my tests. I hope this is useful. /// <summary> /// Author: Ben Maddox /// </summary> public class ZBase32Encoder { /* * Accepted characters based on code from: * http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Base32Encoding.aspx?display=Print */ ...


6

Use the built-in function base_convert. For example: // To convert from base 10 to base 32: echo( base_convert( 12345, 10, 32 ) );


6

Here's a Javascript implementation of CRC32: function crc32 ( str ) { // http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net // + original by: Webtoolkit.info (http://www.webtoolkit.info/) // + improved by: T0bsn // - depends on: utf8_encode // * example 1: crc32('Kevin van Zonneveld'); // * returns 1: 1249991249 str = ...


5

Look into Base64 "encryption." Base 64 will convert a number into 64 different ASCII characters, verses hex which is only 16 different ASCII characters... Making Base64 more compact and what you are looking for. EDIT: Code to do this in VB6 is available here: http://www.nonhostile.com/howto-encode-decode-base64-vb6.asp Per Fuzzy Lollipop, below, Base32 ...


5

There are two hex characters per 8-bit-byte, not two bytes per hex character. If you are working with 8-bit bytes (as in the SHA-1 definition), then a hex character encodes a single high or low 4-bit nibble within a byte. So it takes two such characters for a full byte.


5

schnaader's implementation is indeed very fast. Here it is in Javascript: function checksum(s) { var i; var chk = 0x12345678; for (i = 0; i < s.length; i++) { chk += (s.charCodeAt(i) * (i + 1)); } return chk; } Using Google Chrome, this function takes just 5ms to run for 1-megabyte strings, versus 330ms using a crc32 function.


5

Have a look @ https://bitbucket.org/yaler/yalercontrib/src/a8d40553a4d9/Java/DomainGen/DomainGen.java


4

The beauty of Groovy is its dynamic nature. If you need the feature, but it's not there, add it! Somewhere in a convenient entry point to your application, or in a static block in the class that needs it, add the code lifted straight from the 1.7.3+ sources: String.metaClass.'static'.tr = { String text, String source, String replacement -> if ...


4

[Updated] Apparently, the C++ std::setbase() IO manipulator and normal << and >> IO operators only handle bases 8, 10, and 16, and is therefore useless for handling base 32. So to solve your issue of converting strings with base 10/32 representation of numbers read from some input to integers in the program integers in the program to strings ...


4

I think the OP's confusion comes from a string representing a SHA1 hash takes 40 bytes (at least if you are using ASCII), which equals 320 bits (not 640 bits). The reason is that the hash is in binary and the hex string is just an encoding of that. So if you were to use a more efficient encoding (or no encoding at all), you could take only 160 bits of ...


4

You might want to use your own encode / decode routine? Encode: string acceptedChar = "ABCDEFGHJKLMNPQRSTUWXZ0123456789"; int yourNumber = 12345678; string response = ""; while (yourNumber > 0) { response += acceptedChar[yourNumber % acceptedChar.Length]; yourNumber /= acceptedChar.Length; } Decode: string acceptedChar = ...


4

Pretty much any algorithm you could come up with would satisfy your criteria. E.g. CHECKSUM = SUM( i=0 .. input.length, input[i] ) to make it "bad-char-safe" CHECKSUM = 'A' + SUM( i=0 .. input.length, input[i] ) MODULO 26 An attempt that tries to reduce the number of collisions by increasing the output domain # Assume BASE64[ ] is the safe output ...


4

Quick implementation in C, no copyrights from my side, so use it as you wish. But please note that this is a very weak "checksum", so don't use it for serious things :) - but that's what you wanted, isn't it? This returns an 32-bit integer checksum encoded as an string containing its hex value. If the checksum function doesn't satisfy your needs, you can ...


4

Like any other "ASCII-only" encoding, base32's primary purpose is to make sure that the data it encodes will survive transportation through systems or protocols which have special restrictions on the range of characters they will accept and emerge unmodified. For example, b32-encoded data can be passed to a system that accepts single-byte character input, ...


4

I believe this should be a more efficient implementation of Crockford Base32 encoding: function crockford_encode( $base10 ) { return strtr( base_convert( $base10, 10, 32 ), "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuv", "ABCDEFGHJKMNPQRSTVWXYZ" ); } function crockford_decode( $base32 ) { $base32 = strtr( strtoupper( $base32 ), ...


4

As @Sotirios Delimanolis wrote it can be done using apache commons but you can also use google guava libraries. For example: BaseEncoding.base32().encode("test".getBytes()); will return ORSXG5A=. More information can be found here.


3

Here's a general implementation of Base32 which contains an implementation of the Crockford character set. It has both format and parse methods which should be complimentary. /** * Parse and format base 32 numbers. * * Some of this may apply to almost any format but there's much that won't * such as allowing both uppercase and lowercase forms of each ...


3

The basexx library supports base32 encoding and decoding, and does not have any dependencies.


3

Apache commons-codec provides a Base32 class that does just that Base32 base32 = new Base32(); System.out.println(base32.encodeAsString("test".getBytes())); prints ORSXG5A= You can download it here.


3

The random number generator included in the Framework is pseudo-random without any guarantee of random number distribution. If you are concerned about distribution patterns, consider this article: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/15102/NET-random-number-generators-and-distributions Nevertheless, my statistics professors (not one) used to say, "There is ...


3

It is 207 lines, but it is a javascript implementation of md5: http://www.webtoolkit.info/javascript-md5.html Couple that with a javascript base64: http://www.webtoolkit.info/javascript-base64.html These scripts are totally self contained, so they have some redundancies (such as the UTF-8 encode/decode) that could easily be made common to them. EDIT: On ...


3

Here is one implementation of zBase32 encoding on .NET platform (written in C#).


3

2 hex characters mak up a range from 0-255, i.e. 0x00 == 0 and 0xFF == 255. So 2 hex characters are 8 bit, which makes 160 bit for your SHA digest.


3

Base32 encoding (and Base64) encoding is motivated by situations where you need to encode unrestricted binary within a storage or transport system that allow only data of a certain form such as plain text. Examples include passing data through URLs, XML, or JSON data, all of which are plain text sort of formats that don't otherwise permit or support ...


3

A dictionary is probably a little bit of overkill for what you want to do. Why not just use a tuple: convTable = ('0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V') That will make lookups faster while saving you memory as well. If you are just ...


2

another way to make the convDict >>> import string >>> convDict = {c:int(c,32) for c in (string.digits+string.ascii_lowercase)[:32]} >>> convDict {'1': 1, '0': 0, '3': 3, '2': 2, '5': 5, '4': 4, '7': 7, '6': 6, '9': 9, '8': 8, 'a': 10, 'c': 12, 'b': 11, 'e': 14, 'd': 13, 'g': 16, 'f': 15, 'i': 18, 'h': 17, 'k': 20, 'j': 19, 'm': ...


2

It's a homegrown implementation of the Base32 encoding from RFC 3548. A PHP implementation distributed under the terms of the GPL is available at Fremnet. Example use: <? include('class.base32.php5'); function encode32($str) { $b = new Base32(Base32::csRFC3548); return strtolower($b->fromString($str)); } print encode32("foo bar baz quux") . ...



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