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8

read -p is writing it's output to stderr and echo is writing to stdout. stdout is typically buffered while stderr is not, and so it's not uncommon to see stderr things show up before stdout. You could have your echo also go to stderr if you like by doing echo "string" >&2 or you could run it in the unbuffer command or similar tools if you have them ...


7

You want to echo the lines without a fieldsep: while IFS="" read line; do echo "$line" done <<< " 12345" When you also want to skip interpretation of special characters, use while IFS="" read -r line; do echo "$line" done <<< " 12345" You can write the IFS without double quotes: while IFS= read -r line; do echo "$line" ...


5

Just move the print to outside of the <condition> { <action> } block so it's executed unconditionally Try this: awk '$1 ~ /command/ { s = ""; for (i = 2; i <= NF; i++) s = s $i " "; $0 = $1 " text I am inserting after command " s } 1' file > tmp && mv tmp file I don't understand what you are trying to do with that loop as it ...


5

You can do this with using bash Parameter Expansion: $ echo $var 192.168.21.0/24 $ echo "${var//\//-}" 192.168.21.0-24 So in your command, just use "${i//\//-}" whenever needed without changing the original value of $i. If you want to set variable i to the new value: i="${i//\//-}" On a side note, use while loop to read lines from a file, not cat, ...


5

You can do: sed 's/\(^Volatile_Bit_Rate[[:blank:]]\+\)[0-9]\+$/\138400/' file.txt To edit the file in place: sed -i 's/\(^Volatile_Bit_Rate[[:blank:]]\+\)[0-9]\+$/\138400/' file.txt Example: $ cat file.txt Enable_FUN Yes FUN_Privilege_Level User Force_FUN_Payload_Authentication ...


4

You can try using paste and column command together. Note that this is a shell command so spaces between the assignment operator should be corrected. $ string_1="Title\nfoo bar\nbaz\nfoo bar baz boo" $ string_2="Unrelated Title\ndog cat farm\nspace moon" $ paste -d '|' <(echo -e "$string_1") <(echo -e "$string_2") | column -s'|' -t Title ...


4

ls -t | sed -n '10p' will provide you the name of the 10th more recent file or directory. This will be your time_marker. find ... -mtime +90 ! -newertime_marker... will do the rest.


3

This is a task for sort: sort -uk4 file.log This will get the first line when multiple lines are identical starting from 4th field, if you want the last entry use tac to reverse the lines and do the operation: tac file.log | sort -uk4 Example: $ cat file.txt 2016-05-02 11:37:32,211 (glastopf.glastopf) 190.244.96.69 requested GET ...


3

".*" Putting the * inside double quotes will prevent the shell from treating that as a wildcard and will instead take it as a literal * character. Instead, change your script so that it does not double quote the *. For example: mv ${merchantPortalLogsPath}/logger.log.${olderDate}.* ${merchantPortalLogsPathBackup}/ mv ...


2

In Ruby, you could do it this way: #!/usr/bin/env ruby string_1 = "Title\nfoo bar\nbaz\nfoo bar baz boo" string_2 = "Unrelated Title\ndog cat farm\nspace moon" a1 = string_1.split("\n") a2 = string_2.split("\n") a1.zip(a2).each { |pair| puts "%-20s%s" % [pair.first, pair.last] } # or # a1.zip(a2).each { |left, right| puts "%-20s%s" % [left, right] } ...


2

Why not try using fold? $ str='(Dfa_and_Cfa && Second_Up_or_Down && Third_Down_or_Up_or_Positive) || (First_Up_or_Down) && Third_Down_or_Up && Dfa_and_Cfa && Third_Down_or_Up && Fourth_Up_or_Down' $ fold -sw70 <<< "$str" (Dfa_and_Cfa && Second_Up_or_Down && ...


2

First approach trying to follow OP suggestions: for i in my/path/*.py.x do basename=$(basename "$i") mv my/path/"$basename" my/path/"${basename%.*}" done And maybe, you can simplify it: for i in my/path/*.py.x do mv "$i" "${i%.*}"; done Documentation regarding this kind of operation (parameter expansion): ...


2

With GNU awk for the 4th arg to split(): $ cat tst.awk { prev = "" nf = split($0,f,/\s*(&&|\|\|)\s*/,s) for (i=1;i<=nf;i++) { curr = f[i] s[i] if ( length(prev curr) > 70 ) { print prev } else { curr = prev curr } prev = curr } print curr } $ awk -f ...


2

Do: awk '$5~/^.$/ {print $5}' file.txt To match only a digit: awk '$5~/^[0-9]$/ {print $5}' file.txt Example: $ cat file.txt abcdX1yad45das ffe5a6fb-2933-4c01-855d-3033933600bf ffe5a6fb-2933-4c01-855d-3033933600bf ffe5a6fb-2933-4c01-855d-3033933600bf ffe5a6fb-2933-4c01-855d-3033933600bf 3 foo abcdX1yad45das ffe5a6fb-2933-4c01-855d-3033933600bf ...


2

sed -ri "s/^(Volatile_Bit_Rate\s*)[0-9]+$/\1$var/g" file


2

Start your shell with the -x option; the output will show each command that is executed, which includes the source/. commands that will show you which files are sourced. You'll be able to identify file contains the assignment to PATH of interest.


2

This seems to be what you're looking for: while IFS= read line ; do echo "$line" done <textfile


2

You can achieve it with awk: awk '$1 ~ /command/ { s = ""; for (i = 2; i <= NF; i++) s = s $i " "; print $1 " " "new string here" " " s }'


2

# is a shell comment. You'll need to quote it, like so: rm '#'* Note that the hash is in quotes and the glob is outside the quotes.


2

Assuming you want a tab-delimited "table" for each form, try the following stylesheet: XSLT 1.0 <xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" xmlns:t="http://www.test.com"> <xsl:output method="text"/> <xsl:template match="/t:Data"> <xsl:for-each select="t:form"> <!-- table header ...


2

You are looking to match the words "OK" and "NOK" against a longer string. To put it into perspective: "Backup of Monday: OK: Backup of CURRENT: NOK" does not equal "OK" or "NOK". You are wanting to do a search for a pattern within a string. See the revised code below. This will look for ": OK" or ": NOK" within the string $RES. I hope this helps. if ...


2

Using awk you can do: awk -F, '!seen[$1]++{c++} END{print c}' file 2 This awk command uses key $1, and stores them in an array seen. Value of which is incremented to 1 when a key is populated first time. Every time we get a unique key we increment count c and print it in the end.


2

When you do this: bar=($@) You're actually creating a bash shell array. To iterate a bash array use: bar=( "$@" ) # safer way to create array for foo in "${bar[@]}" do echo "$foo" done


2

You can use awk command: awk 'FNR==NR{a[$1]; next} $2 in a' file2.txt file1.txt In the first iteration we store all values from file2.txt into an array a. In the 2nd step white iterating file1.txt we check if column 2 is in array a and print it. Output: 1 A bla 9232 1 B tesfs 3049 2 E eor 4042


2

I'll interpret your question as equivalent to creating an array of known length with some number of a and the same number of -a, then getting a random permutation of that array. Do you need to do it in bash? If so, you can create an array of the desired length first, then shuffle it. From the BashFaq: This function shuffles the elements of an array ...


2

I'm adding a separate answer since you may actually be looking for something much simpler. If you want to loop through 20 values, ten of which are 1 and ten of which are -1, in random order, I would just do this: $ for i in {1..10}; do echo 1; echo -1; done | shuf -1 1 -1 1 -1 1 -1 1 1 1 -1 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 1 1 1 -1


2

Your locale is different between the 2 machines. Set LC_ALL=C (or whatever locale you want) before executing both commands and see https://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/Locale-influences-conversions.html for more information.


2

The same trick applies, just change 1 to 0 !:0-


1

rm \#* should do the trick for you. Remember # has got special meaning in the shell, it starts a comment. To quote Lines beginning with a # (with the exception of #!) are comments and will not be executed. Comments may also occur following the end of a command. & escape [backslash]. A quoting mechanism for single characters. \X ...


1

Does it have to be a regexp? You can easily do it with a glob pattern, if you set in your script shopt -o extglob to enable extended globbing. You would then use the pattern !(*[Cc][Gg][Ss]*) to generate all entries which do NOT have CGS in their name.



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