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0

You can use find to accomplish this. for file in $(find ${dir} -iname "FileName_${TIMESTAMP}-*") do echo $file done Here in case if there is no files in the ${dir} the for loop will not report any error and considers it an a empty list and moves to the next code block.


0

Kent was absolutely correct when he mentioned about cutting the grep out of the equation completely. For anyone interested here is the final code using my method: line=$(grep -n "latitude" /tmp/system.cfg |cut -f1 -d:); sed -i "${line}s/.*/system.latitude=1.999/" /tmp/system.cfg; But I will be going with Kent's answer for the final implementation. This ...


1

That's because alias expansion is performed previous to parameter expansion: Command-line Processing As you can see, you can go through the process again with eval, which is not recommended, or using some alternatives as the one by @anubhava. Example $ alias anyalias="echo kallel" $ var=anyalias $ $var anyalias: no se encontró la orden $ eval $var ...


3

if I understood you right, you can just save the grep|cut, your requirement could be done in one shot with (gnu) sed: sed -i '/latitude/s/.*/system.latitude=1.888888/' /tmp/system.cfg


0

This really is a job for sed since it's just a simple substitution on single lines, but here's GNU awk on a modified input file that contains a couple of 7-digit 2nd fields plus one 6 and one 8: $ cat file Andrew 1231239 Mick 234234 Steve 3453457 Bob 45645623 $ $ awk '{$2=gensub(/^(...)(.)(...)$/,"\\1-\\2-\\3","",$2)}1' file Andrew 123-1-239 Mick 234234 ...


0

A hint: Below script checks what date it is and then finds all files under DIR that are older than this month. (eg, older than (day of month + 1) days ) The script then echos the found files, replace the call to echo with a call to rm to remove instead of echo. For safety reasons I've commented it out. #!/bin/bash TODAY=$(date +%d) TODAY=$(( TODAY + 1 )) ...


1

Use an array with nullglob. shopt -s nullglob arr=(${dir}/FileName_${TIMESTAMP}-*) for file in "${arr[@]}"; do done


1

projroot=/home/user/projects goroot() { # Strip off project root prefix. local m=${d#$projroot/} if [ "$m" = "$d" ]; then echo "Not in ~/projects" return fi # Strip off project directory. local suf=${m#*/} if [ "$suf" = "$m" ]; then echo "Already in project root." return fi # cd to ...


4

Instead of alias consider using function: anyfunc() { echo "kallel"; } v=anyfunc $v kallel Safer is to store the call of function in an array (will store arguments also, if needed): var=(anyfunc) "${var[@]}" kallel


2

To evaluate a glob with no match to nothing, you need to turn nullglob on: shopt -s nullglob Be careful, as it doesn't always do what you need. Try ls nonexistent-prefix-*: the output is identical to ls with no parameter. You might also be interested in the failglob option, which turns a non-matching glob into an error.


1

Assuming I am understanding correctly, this should work: goroot() { cd $(sed -r 's#(~/projects/[^/]*)/.*#\1#' <<< $PWD); } This sed command effectively strips off everything after ~/projects/SOMETHING and then changes to that directory. If you're not in ~/projects/ then it will leave you in the current directory. Note: this assumes that $PWD ...


1

i think you could use try run that script on something echo a | sed "$pattern" >/dev/null 2>/dev/null and then check the $? if [ $? != 0 ]; then # means sed failed #... but maybe sed will think it will be its argument too. btw, handle arguments using getopt will make things easier. i don't think the way you design argument format is good. maybe ...


0

You can also use a for loop and exit it on success: for try in {1..10} ; do [[ -d /somemount/share/folder ]] && break done The problem (which exists in the other solutions, too) is that once the loop ends, you don't know how it ended - was the directory found, or was the counter exhausted?


4

Keep a counter: #!/bin/sh while ! test -d /somemount/share/folder do echo "Waiting for mount /somemount/share/folder..." ((c++)) && ((c==10)) && break sleep 1 done


2

Because you called system in the parent and in the child. Check start's return value as documented. #!/usr/bin/perl use Parallel::ForkManager; my $pm = Parallel::ForkManager->new(5); my $pid = $pm->start; if (!$pid) { print "From child: $$\n"; system("sleep 12345"); $pm->finish; } print "From parent: $$ $pid\n"; ...


0

Here's another way. X=5; file=<file>; \ head -n $X $file && \ cat $file | sed '1,'$X'd' | \ sed 's/\([^;]\)$/\1@@@/g' | \ tr -d '\n' | \ tr ';' '\n' | \ sed 's/$/;/g' | \ awk -F "@@@" '{print $2"@@@"$1}' | \ sed 's/^@@@//g' | \ sort --ignore-case | \ awk -F "@@@" '{print $2"\n"$1"\n"}' | \ cat -s Explained. X=5; file=<file>; \ ...


1

If you want to pass a command to your new shell: #!/bin/bash unshare -n /bin/bash -c ps


2

It will. It hasn't been executed yet. unshare -n /bin/bash is still running. First you have to exit bash (exit, ctrl+d, ...)


1

Looks like you have DOS line feeds in your .bash_profile. Don't edit files on Windows, and/or use a proper tool to copy them to your Linux system. In more detail, you probably can't see it, but the erroneous line actually reads export TERM=xterm-256color^M where ^M is a literal DOS carriage return. Like @EtanReisner mentions in a comment, you should ...


0

You end with 4 processes : your initial program and 3 childs. As you do not use any synchronizations between them the order of execution is undefined. All you know is that inside each program the order must be respected. Parent part (I only keep what is relevant) : Running System ...i+i Running System ...i+i Running System ...i+i Child part (id.) : 3 ...


1

You can used dirname to reliably get the directory path. folderlist=($(find . -size 0 -print0|xargs -0 -I% dirname %)) for i in "${folderlist[@]}" do echo $i done


0

Your program creates two child processes which do the printing. The kernel is free to schedule the child processes in any order suitable by the kernel, although by convention, it tries to run the child process first. If you run your same code multiple times, you can observe the print output will change according to which child is scheduled first.


0

Ncurses creates its own character window in the terminal and allows you to acces and overwrite characters at specific positions. This looks perfect for your game, where you can draw character-art cards anywhere on the screen. Way better than emulating the same by scrolling () the terminal, anyway. – M Oehm Curses is the best option, as compatible libraries ...


2

Try this : find /location/of/directory/ -type f -size +2G -exec du -s {} + |sort -n -exec executes command du -s on each search result and and sort -n sorts the result numerically.


2

You can use %k for example to print the size in kilobytes: find . -type f -size +2G -printf "%kKB %p\n" | sort -n By saying -printf "%kKB %p\n" you are printing the file in kilobytes and then the name. sort -n gets this input and sorts it accordingly. See an example: $ find . -type f -size +1M -printf "%p %kKB\n" | sort -n -k2 ./arrr.txt.gz 1664KB ...


1

To strip just file names from find output you can use: folderlist=($(find . -size 0 -exec bash -c 'echo "${1%/*}"' - {} \;)) Or to loop through those entries: while read -r f; do echo "Processing: $f" done < <(find . -size 0 -exec bash -c 'echo "${1%/*}"' - {} \;)


2

Fork returns a different PID to both of the processes. The parent process receives the PID of the child, and it returns 0 to the child process. So the reason you're seeing two prints is because both processes are printing the value that was returned to them.


3

as as if the print line is executed twice? I recommend you first learn what fork() does before you use it. Then you will understand why the line is executed twice. In short: fork creates a copy of the current process and from then on both processes run the rest of the code. One major difference is that the return code from the child is 0 and from the ...


1

The ~ character has not been expanded. Add $HOME/.composer/vendor/bin to the path instead.


0

if you can use perl (ok, ok it is equal to sed, and \cite{@Beta} already told us how to do it :)... perl -pe 's/\b(\d{3})(\d)(\d{3})\b/$1-$2-$3/g' You need to adapt the numbers to your length... Testing: using a previous example \cite{@paxdiablo} $ echo 'Andrew 123456 Mick abcdef BBB 12345 Steve 314159 Bob xxxyzz' | perl -pe ...


0

Try this: #!/bin/bash for i in {1..99} do j=$(echo "$i % 2" | bc) if [[ $j -ne 0 ]] then echo $i fi done


1

No need to use a condition: for i in {1..99..2} ; do echo $i done To use the condition with the modulo operator, use arithmetic condition: if (( i % 2 != 0 )) ; then


1

The problem here is your if statement. If you are using bash, you can take advantage of the (( )) syntax here too: if (( i % 2 != 0 )); then echo "$i"; fi You will often find that people write this using && too: (( i % 2 != 0 )) && echo "$i" This version is most faithful to the original, in that you are incrementing the counter i by one ...


0

Your example output shows a mix of seconds, hours, and other time formats. Assuming you really do want time in seconds, always, try this Awk attempt. awk '{ # Collect fields split on A/B/C j=1; h=m=s=0; delete x; for (i=1; i<=NF; ++i) { if ($i ~ /^(A|B|C)$/) ++j; else x[j] = x[j] (x[j] ? FS : "") $i; } # Parse ...


2

Think this is what you want In awk awk 'BEGIN{RS="";FS="\n"} {t=$NF} match(t,/^"([^"]+)/,a){ key[NR]=tolower(a[1])"\t"++x b[x]=$0 } END { asort(key) for (i=1; i<=x; i++) { split(key[i],a,"\t") print b[a[2]] "\n" } }' file output /* The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy */ "42" = "the answer to life the universe and ...


0

The reason why this does not work is that you are really just stopping /opt/myapp which when being killed does not automatically kill its children (the java process). Either do that in your script manually (which is tricky) or have the start-stop-daemon start java directly. It should then loook like this start-stop-daemon -S -m -p $PIDFILE --name myapp ...


2

You can use gsub() to remove the quotes: $ echo '"3"' | awk '{gsub("\"", "", $1); print}' 3 In your case, this should make: val=$(./cli.sh ... | awk '/result/{gsub("\"", "", $3); print $3}') Test Sample file: $ cat a returns a b "75" returns b c "33" returns d e 7 hello z z 7 And let's run it: $ awk '/return/ {gsub("\"", "", $4); print $4}' a 75 ...


0

EDIT: sorry, i misunderstood the question, as noted below this doesn't work if input is '"75"'. I misunderstood the question, use gsub instead as someone suggested. No need to cast it if you are working in bash. In bash any string can be used as an integer just by accessing it between using double round parenthesis. For instance: #!/bin/bash ...


0

Try: val=$(./cli.sh --file=scripts/monitor.sh | awk '/result/{print substr($3, 2, length($2)-1)}') echo $val


0

If I understand your question, you can use: unset a However, it is not very convenient, because it requires to unset one-by-one. Looking forward to better solution.


2

Perhaps this can serve your purpose: This answer has 2 parts, which you were looking for: Set $? to any required value Use ${PIPESTATUS[@]} array to obtain exit status of individual stages of the pipeline... Code: #!/bin/bash return_code() { return $1; } # A dummy function to set $? to any value fifo=myPipe mkfifo "${fifo}"|| exit 1 { read ...


4

You can use ignore case sort: sort -f Localizable.strings "app" = "app"; "Application settings" = "Application settings"; "Average rating" = "Average rating"; "Back" = "Back"; "back" = "back";


1

#!/usr/bin/perl use strict; my $file1=shift; my %dic=(); open(F1,$file1) or die("cant find replcmente file\n"); while(<F1>){ # slurp File1 to dic if(/(.*)\s*(.*)/){$dic{$2}=$1} } while(<>){ # for all File2 lines s/(?<=>)(.*)/ $dic{$1} || $1/e; # sub ">id" by >dic{id} print } I ...


0

This might work for you (GNU sed): sed -r '/^(\S+)(\s+)(\S+)\s+0/s//&\2\1\1/;/^(\S+)(\s+)(\S+)\s+1/s//&\2\1\3/;//^(\S+)(\s+)(\S+)\s+2/s//&\2\3\3/' file This appends a fourth column (or inserts if the line has more than three columns) depending on the third column.


0

Next time please post example input and output. I think you want the following: TYPE="a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6" TYPE_APACHE="a2 a4 a5" TYPE_CANAL_RAW="" for type in ${TYPE}; do echo ${type} if [[ ${TYPE_APACHE} != *${type}* ]]; then TYPE_CANAL_RAW="${TYPE_CANAL_RAW} ${type}" fi done TYPE_CANAL=${TYPE_CANAL_RAW# } I think you should make a ...


1

<> does I/O redirection for both reading and writing. See I/O Redirection The 6 means we assign it to file descriptor six. What are file descriptors? || is in bash executed when the lefthand-side command failed. In other words, this in an else


0

Ok, the problem was unrelated with cURL. Basically, the backend cache the results before sending them to the actual datastore. So, the second cURL didn't find the data the first one stored (they were connected, really, I realized later). I fixed it by putting a sleep between both calls. So, the cache system has enough time to dump the data.


0

I think I found the solution from this thread : Git ignore sub folders @mgold 's answer . he is suggesting to add */* to gitignore. It worked for me in windows if you are using a linux based system you might need to alter the regex . I hope this helps.


0

It seems the user you're running as doesn't have permission to write to the default ssh-agent socket location. This should fix your problem: ssh-agent -a ~/.ssh-agent.$$ This specifies the socket location with the -a option, as ~/.ssh-agent.$$, ie, inside your home directory. The permissions issue could be caused by something like simple UNIX ...


0

the function could be implemented as a simple set -x to turn on tracing at a given point of a script and set +x to turn it off. If you definitely wish to implement it as a one line flag, I would take a look at this question and configure -x flag through DEBUG trap.



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