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two errors in one line: set count = %count% + 1: a) the space between count and = is part of your variable name. (It would be %count %) b) to calculate with set, you need the /a parameter: set /a count=%count% + 1 Surprisingly, set /a doesn't care for the additional space, but get used to the syntax without spaces around the = - this keeps life simple. ...


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get the list into a file and compare your input with that file: :Get_ISOlanguage set "ISOlanguage=" set /p "ISOlanguage=Enter subtitle language in ISO 639-2 standard abbreviation: " find /i "%ISOlanguage%" ISO6392.txt >nul || (echo wrong input & goto :Get_ISOlanguage) To create the file, I copied the list from here to a temp file and extracted the ...


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To complement Klitos Kyriacou's helpful answer: A pipe is definitely not the right choice, but & and && can in principle be used to execute multiple commands on a single line, so you may be tempted to do the following: set /p filename="" && copy NUL "%filename%.bat" # !! WRONG The problem is that variable reference %filename% is ...


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That's not how the pipe works. The pipe takes the output of the previous command, and makes it the input of the next command. Your set /p filename= command doesn't produce any output, so the copy NUL %a%.bat doesn't get any input, but that's irrelevant anyway, because the copy command doesn't take any input anyway. Your copy NUL %a%.bat command creates an ...


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Use echo(%cho% btw - your poste code states echo CHO which should echo CHO


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The for command can not set the ERRORLEVEL to 1; it just preserve the same value it had before. I suggest you to set the ERRORLEVEL to 0 before the for via this line: ver > nul You may review a full description of the ERRORLEVEL values set by all internal commands at What are the ERRORLEVEL values set by internal cmd.exe commands? Also, you didn't ...


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So, after a night of research, I came accross this solution. I reset the registry permissions as shown in the link. After that, the problem is gone.


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The best option is Javascript. It can easily run from a plugin of your browser. (I'm using 'Custom Javascript for Websites', a chrome plugin: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/custom-javascript-for-web/poakhlngfciodnhlhhgnaaelnpjljija) Firstly you navigate to the login page and check the source code for the following ID's: - Username-inputbox - ...


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There is free tool called Fiddler. It monitors/debugs all the traffic on your machine i.e. using browsers or any other medium. You can try capturing the action/request behind the login button using Fiddler, and then mutate the same action/request and you will be able to change the username/password for that action/request. Download from here, and read this. ...



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