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0

I offer a perhaps easier solution for replacing each tilde character in value string of an environment variable by a tilde in braces than Dennis van Gils which works also fine for this task. @echo off set "TestVar=hello~world." echo TestVar has value: %TestVar% call :SpecialReplace "TestVar" echo TestVar has value: %TestVar% goto :EOF rem The subroutine ...


0

A more explicit way: @echo off set input= set /p input="Type some text : " if "%input%"=="" ( echo You didn't type anything! ) else ( for %%a in (%input%) do ( if /i "%%a"=="Hello" ( echo Hello! ) ) )


0

Try this: @echo off set /p "str=say something containing the word Hello " if not "x%str:hello=%"=="x%str%" echo Hello, how may I help you? pause


1

So I did some digging and it seems this is really, really hard. However, I did find this, which solves the problem, giving us this as code: @echo off set "input=Hello~world." echo input: %input% call :wavereplacer "%input%" {tilde} output set output=%output:{tilde}={~}% echo output: %output% pause ::your own code should be above this. goto :eof ...


1

DOSBOX emulates a 16bit hardware. Explorer.exe is either 32 bit or 64 bit. No chance to run that from Dosbox. You would need an 16 bit browser (if you google, look for "windows 3.1"). But don't expect them to be compatible with modern websites (Java, Flash, .HTML4/5,Silverstar,...) You don't want to run explorer inside the dosbox, but want the dosbox to ...


2

(FOR /L %x in (1,1,100) DO c:\php\php.exe MyScript.php %x)>output.txt 2>&1 >output.txt redirects STDOUT to a file. 2>&1 redirects STDERR to the same place. (Note: this is a command line syntax. To use it in a batchfile, use %%x instead of %x)


2

For doing it in the shell itself: FOR /L %parameter IN (start,step,end) DO command For example: FOR /L %x IN (1,1,100) DO c:\php\php.exe MyScript.php %x For doing it in a .bat file: FOR /L %%parameter IN (start,step,end) DO command For example: FOR /L %%x IN (1,1,100) DO c:\php\php.exe MyScript.php %%x However, I don't know if this will ...


0

The current user IS admin. Windows supports multiple users (although only 1 live one at a time). What you can do is query for users logged on and choose the interactive one. Lists of potential users wmic PATH Win32_SystemUsers get /format:List wmic PATH WIN32_UserAccount get /format:List wmic PATH WIN32_Account get /format:List All the users logged on ...


0

I ran into similar issue before, try using whoami


0

main.atom is not an executable, so it can't take any parameters Windows knows, which program has to be started and does so (ignoring any parameters) Only if you start the executable directly, you can define parameters (the first one being main.atom) for example: C:\>assoc .txt .txt=txtfile C:\>ftype txtfile ...


0

RGuggisberg's answer is perfectly valid. Just to extend it for several years (might be your next question): setlocal enabledelayedexpansion for /L %%y in (14,1,16) do ( for /L %%m in (1,1,12) do ( REM add a leading zero: set "month=0%%m" REM take the last two digits from month: echo 20%%y!month:~-2! pushd ...


3

IMO this question makes no sense. There is no way to avoid to preserve the new file contents in a place different than the original file; this is true even in any advanced programming language, that would require to read from second line to end of file and copy each line to the beginning of the file. However, at end of the process it would be necessary to ...


0

The HKEY_CURRENT_USER changes when the current user changes (i.e. to Administrator). You will need to make your script write to the relevant sub-key of HKEY_CURRENT_USERS instead - note the S at the end. (See here for a bit more on this.)


2

If you don't care about preserving blank lines, !, (, ), or ^, you can run the input file through a for loop, storing each line in a separate variable, then merging the variables with a newline character at the end of each one. @echo off setlocal enabledelayedexpansion cls set counter=0 for /f "delims=" %%A in (input.txt) do ( set line[!counter!]=%%A ...


0

In general a new file is needed because the requested operation requires that you READ and WRITE. So with only 1 file you would be modifying the file that you are reading! If you are simply concerned about the resultant file being a different file, that can be resolved by deleting the original and renaming the new file when done. The PUSHD and POPD are ...


0

64 bit OS? Which CMD.exe are you using? YES... there is a 32 bit one and a 64 bit one! You are probably writing to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software... in one case and to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Wow6432Node in the other case. Do REG ADD /? if on a 64 bit OS and you will see the parameter to specify 32/64 bit area of registry. Otherwise add the line @ECHO ON on ...


1

This will get you started. Note that you use %x from a CMD prompt and %%x in a bat file. I used L instead of l because l looks too similar to a 1. @echo off for /L %%x in (201502, 1, 201512) do echo(%%x pause


1

Yep. for %%I in ("testfile.txt") do echo %%~nI or for %%I in ("%file%") do echo %%~nI Do help for in a cmd console window and see the last two pages for more information on tilde operations. There is another way to accomplish what you want, using substring substitution similar to your attempts illustrated in your question. set "file=testfile.txt" ...


0

You can try this: @echo off set "file=testfile.txt" call :removeExtension "%file%" echo %newFile% pause goto :eof :removeExtension set "newFile=%~n1" goto :eof However, this only works if the file has no path. If it does, you can do this: @echo off setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion set "file=files\testfile.txt" call :removeExtension "%file%" echo ...


0

input is the variable name you use afterwards, so try set /p input=Say yes or no... instead of dummy. And then: if not "%input%"=="yes" goto lol if not "%input%"=="no" goto lol since you have caught 'yes' before, not "%input%"=="yes" is always true here. The next line can never be reached. And at the moment, you can replace both lines simply with ...


1

The .Arguments belong to the WScript object, not the Shell. & is the concatenation operator, it makes no sense between a method name and the first/only argument. So use Set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell") WshShell.Run "notepad.exe", 9 ' Start notepad in order to test my failure. WScript.Sleep 500 ' ...


1

The space in the path passed to the exist test is confusing the parser. In general you should place quotes around such names. IF EXIST "C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome" ( start chrome www.google.com ) ELSE ( start iexplore www.google.com )


0

Try using : Run as administrator


0

to elaborate on Stephan's response. Put another label below the text you want to omit, then change your goto to point to that. For example, see the :scannolabel changes below :scan echo "Running scan again..." :scannolabel for /F %%I in ('%SystemRoot%\System32\schtasks.exe /query /s SERVER /fo list /tn "TASK" ^| %SystemRoot%\System32\find.exe /c ...


3

The command FOR is the preferred method to get output lines of a command into a variable for further processing. Run in a command prompt window for /? for details on this command. for /F %%I in ('%SystemRoot%\System32\schtasks.exe /query /s SERVER /fo list /tn "TASK" ^| %SystemRoot%\System32\find.exe /c "Running"') do if "%%I" == "0" goto :EOF The pipe ...


0

Use For Batch file: for /d %%a in ("C:\Users\") do dir /ad /on /b "%%a" If User contains 3 folders, This will print: Folder1 Folder2 Folder3 If you want all sub-folders list with full path use for /d %%a in ("C:\Users\") do dir /ad /on /S /b "%%a" This will print: C:/Users/Folder1 C:/Users/Folder1/Data C:/Users/Folder2 C:/Users/Folder3


0

You can do it with batch. I put together a quick script and it worked for me: @ECHO OFF SETLOCAL EnableExtensions SET SourceFile="mb.properties" SET OutputFile="mb-new.properties" SET "FindKey=mb.datasource.password" SET "NewValue=apassword" REM Basic parse for INI file format. (FOR /F "usebackq eol= tokens=1,* delims==" %%A IN (`TYPE %SourceFile%`) DO ( ...


0

Thanks to @Squashman for pointing out my stupid mistake. This is my solution to the problem. mkdir processed for %%F in (*.jpg) do ( ffmpeg -i %%F -q:v 10 processed/%%F" ) I got like a 80% of weight reduction.


0

Ok. there are several points here; the first one is that the set /A command may work with just the names of variables, so all your variable expansions are not needed. This should work: set /a A=A1+A2+A3+A4+A5+A6+A7+A8+A9 set /a B=B1+B2+B3+B4+B5+B6+B7+B8+B9 set /a C=C1+C2+C3+C4+C5+C6+C7+C8+C9 set /a D=D1+D2+D3+D4+D5+D6+D7+D8+D9 set "TestTheAnswer= The ...


0

@ECHO OFF SETLOCAL FOR /L %%a IN (1,1,9) DO SET /a A%%a=%%a * 2 SET /a total=0 FOR /L %%a IN (1,1,9) DO SET /a total+=A%%a SET a ECHO %total% GOTO :EOF I haven't the first idea what 45 has to do with the price of fish. What you appear to be doing is totalling A1..A9, B1..B9 .. D1..D9 then doing nothing with the totals of B..D Still, here's an easy way ...


0

just add A, to the variable: ... set "wrongs= " if %A% NEQ 45 set "wrongs=%wrongs%A, " if %B% NEQ 45 set "wrongs=%wrongs%B, " if %C% NEQ 45 set "wrongs=%wrongs%C, " if %D% NEQ 45 set "wrongs=%wrongs%D, " echo The following lines are wrong:%wrongs%


1

Try: for /r %I in (*.epub) do "ebook-convert.exe" "%I" "%~nI.mobi" Good luck!


1

In your batch file run.bat, set the environment variable A and run the PowerShell script: set A=8 PowerShell.exe -File .\script.ps1 pause In script.ps1, get the environment variable A, and assign its value to B: $B=$Env:A echo $B When you run run.bat you get: C:\Temp\try>set A=8 C:\Temp\try>PowerShell.exe -File .\script.ps1 8 ...


-1

The solution is that you should uncheck (deactivate) option "Run only if user is logged on". After that change, it starts to work on my machine.


0

Using the information you provided, this should move the files. Test it on sample files first. @echo off for /f "delims=" %%a in ('dir *.csv /b /a-d') do ( for /f "tokens=2 delims=: " %%b in ("%%~ta") do ( md "Batch %%b" 2>nul move "%%a" "Batch %%b" >nul ) ) pause Initial debugging steps below: When you run this in the ...


0

This is a more succinct version of jebs answer. It uses the same goto technique, but instead of passing a unique "START" parameter when re-entering, it tests if the first character of the first parameter is ":" using a substring extraction and only calls goto if it's a label. This simplifies the call, however you can't use substring extraction with %1 ...


2

@ECHO OFF SETLOCAL set "MDSStr==" set "mdsvar=Hello=World" set "mdsvar2==Hello World" set "mdsvar3=Hello World=" set "mdsvar4=Hello=====World" set "mdsvar5======Hello World" set "mdsvar6=Hello World=====" set "mdsvar7=Hello World" SET mds ECHO -------------------------------------------------------------------- FOR /f "tokens=1*delims==" %%a IN ...


0

dir /ad "c:\somepath" Type dir /? and help.


0

svn status %1 ^| find "?" will filter the output of svn status command (with the first argument passed) and will show the lines that contain "?".Pipe is escaped because the command is invoked from a for loop. for /f processes an output of a command . "tokens=2*" means get the second word and everything after will count as the third word. The words are ...


0

To put an "=" in a string do this: set "MDSStr==" Echo your string and pipe the output to the find command to find display only lines that do not contain the find string (=) like this: set "MDSStr==" set mdsvar="Hello=World" echo(%mdsvar% | find /v "%MDSStr%"


0

You need escape =. Try to do it so ^=.


0

Follow advise of @bgalea. Where is %user% defined? Did you mean %username%? Of course this scheme will not work if you plan to have builds done by a build agent later. The reason it is not working is that variables are expanded at load time. Consequently, %SERVERNAME% is expanded when the line is loaded...BEFORE the user has entered a value. Try changing to ...


0

As an addendum to @xmechanix's answer, I noticed through writing the contents to a file: echo | set /p dummyName=Hello World > somefile.txt That this will add an extra space at the end of the printed string, which can be inconvenient, specially since we're trying to avoid adding a new line (another whitespace character) to the end of the string. ...


0

@echo off call :isAdmin if %errorlevel% == 0 ( goto :run ) else ( echo Requesting administrative privileges... goto :UACPrompt ) exit /b :isAdmin fsutil dirty query %systemdrive% >nul exit /b :run <YOUR BATCH SCRIPT HERE> exit /b :UACPrompt echo Set UAC = CreateObject^("Shell.Application"^) > ...


0

I have the exact same issue with zlib 1.2.8 on Windows 10 using VS2013 targeting x64. I was able to get around it by the zlibvc.vcxproj: In ItemDefinitionGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)|$(Platform)'=='Debug|x64'" Change: <PreBuildEvent> <Command>cd ..\..\..\contrib\masmx64 bld_ml64.bat </Command> ...


0

@ECHO OFF SETLOCAL SET "sourcedir=U:\sourcedir" SET "destdir=U:\destdir" FOR /f "delims=" %%d IN ( 'dir /b /ad "%destdir%\*ahc*" 2^>nul ^|findstr /i /r /c:"AHC[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]"' ) DO ( FOR /f "delims=" %%a IN ( 'dir /b /a-d "%sourcedir%\%%d*" 2^>nul ^|findstr /i /r /c:" AHC[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] "' ) DO ( ECHO(MOVE ...


1

del /s /a /f c:\myfile.txt /s says to search hard drive starting a c:\ to find the file and delete it. /a says find hidden files as well. /f says delete read only files as well (normally del won't).


0

@ECHO OFF SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION SET "sourcedir=U:\sourcedir" FOR /f "delims=" %%a IN ( 'dir /b /a-d /on "%sourcedir%\*.net" ' ) DO ( SET "copyme=%%~na" SET "copyme=!copyme:.=\!" ECHO(START "" xcopy "c:\users\%username%\!copyme:~7!\*.*" "H:\bup\%username%\" ) GOTO :EOF This should work for you. You would need to change the setting of ...


0

In linux (or windows with cygwin) you can use locate. This will find every file.txt on the drive and prompt for each file if you want to remove it. for path in $(locate /file.txt); do rm -i "$path"; done


1

If you're on Windows 2003 or later, you can use the where command. If you have a general idea of where the file is, you can pass it to where as part of the /r option, otherwise, you can look in the entire drive (although be warned, it's really, really slow if your hard drive is big). From there, you can pass the results of the search to a for /f loop and ...



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