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Closely related to Bayesian bandits are Bayesian mixture models. You can think of a Bayesian bandit as being a Bayesian mixture of delta functions. This removes the discreteness constraint. Instead, you can model the distribution over your continuous space as a sum of continuous valued random variables. For example, you could suppose that there are 5 "click ...


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You can treat this as a binary classification problem. It is either an article he likes to read or an article he possibly doesn't like to read. You can use the dlib C++ library for the binary classifier algorithm.


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Can you post the full BUGS model? In the above, it just looks like a series of deterministic transformations in BUGS after the priors for x and y, rather than the definition of a prior. Assuming the logp above is what you want, though, you can implement it in PyMC much more simply as: def logp(value, y): N = 4 return -log((sin(2*3.141593*N * ...


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This error appears to be due to the ldaFuncs. Apparently they do not like factors when using matrix input. The main problem can be re-created with your test data using mm <- ldaFuncs$fit(train[2:5], train[,1]) ldaFuncs$pred(mm,train[2:5]) # Error in FUN(x, aperm(array(STATS, dims[perm]), order(perm)), ...) : # non-numeric argument to binary operator ...


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Though the documentation said it's able to handle datasets with both discrete and continuous variables. The reality is that it's seems error out in some function for continuous only datasets. See errata of the book see http://www.bnlearn.com/book-useR/. Where it says: page 39: at least in modern times, deal is unable to fit a network containing only ...


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Below are the answer by user95215 amended so that it compiles, and another version more in the Rcpp style: #include <Rcpp.h> using namespace Rcpp; // [[Rcpp::export]] IntegerVector oneMultinomC(NumericVector probs) { int k = probs.size(); SEXP ans; PROTECT(ans = Rf_allocVector(INTSXP, k)); probs = Rf_coerceVector(probs, REALSXP); ...


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In the case of bayesglm, you could do sims <- arm::sim(m1.arm, n = 1000) y_sim <- rnorm(n = 1000, mean = sims@coef %*% t(as.matrix(s1)), sd = sims@sigma) mean(y_sim) For the (unreleased) rstanarm, it would be similar sims <- as.matrix(m1.stan) y_sim <- rnorm(n = nrow(sims), mean = sims[,1:(ncol(sims)-1)] %*% t(as.matrix(s1)), ...


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I think that you are correct that there is a problem in your likelihood when xmin is less than some data values. My solution would be to explicitly prohibit this case, by returning a log-likelihood of -np.inf when it arises: @mc.stochastic(observed=True) def power_law(value=simulated, alpha=alpha, xmin=xmin): if value.min() < xmin: return ...



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