Hot answers tagged

35

Choose any one of the following: Via JavaScript: ctx.imageSmoothingEnabled = false; Source: http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/the-canvas-element.html#image-smoothing On Gecko, you'll need ctx.mozImageSmoothingEnabled = false; Source: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/CanvasRenderingContext2D#Gecko-specific_attributes ...


31

You need to set the FILTER_BITMAP_FLAG flag in your paint. canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, matrix, null); //ugly jaggies unless scale is 1:1, but fast or Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setFilterBitmap(); canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, matrix, paint); // pretty but slower (not too slow, usually) The same applies to other (syntactic sugar) forms of the drawBitmap ...


13

My favorite resource for audio interpolating (especially in resampling applications) is Olli Niemitalo's "Elephant" paper. I've used a couple of these and they sound terrific (much better than a straight cubic solution, which is relatively noisy). There are spline forms, Hermite forms, Watte, parabolic, etc. And they are discussed from an audio ...


11

I think it's pretty well explained in Wikipedia. You need the intensity values of 4*4=16 pixels, from which you can calculate the interpolated value at any point within that 4*4 grid. If you mean how to do this for RGB triplets, you just do the process separately for each component.


11

What you want is a Cubic Hermite Spline: where p0 is the start point, p1 is the end point, m0 is the start tangent, and m1 is the end tangent


10

try not exchanging width and height. for (int i = 0; i < dest_width; ++i) { for (int j = 0; j < dest_height; ++j)


6

The missing function cubic() in the answer above could look like this: vec4 cubic(float x) { float x2 = x * x; float x3 = x2 * x; vec4 w; w.x = -x3 + 3*x2 - 3*x + 1; w.y = 3*x3 - 6*x2 + 4; w.z = -3*x3 + 3*x2 + 3*x + 1; w.w = x3; return w / 6.f; } It returns the four weights for cubic B-Spline. It is all explained ...


6

double InterpCubic(double x0, double x1, double x2, double x3, double t) { double a0, a1, a2, a3; a0 = x3 - x2 - x0 + x1; a1 = x0 - x1 - a0; a2 = x2 - x0; a3 = x1; return a0*(t^3) + a1*(t^2) + a2*t + a3; } where x1 and x2 are the samples being interpolated between, x0 is x1's left neighbor, and x3 is x2's right neighbor. t is [0, 1], ...


5

I realize this question was asked a while ago, but incase anyone else is still running into this. The reason the thumbnails look like ass are caused by two things (primarily the first one): Non-incremental image scaling in Java is very rough, throws a lot of pixel data out and averages the result once regardless of the rendering hint. Processing a poorly ...


5

I think GPU is the way to go. It's probably the most natural task for this type of hardware. I would start by looking into CUDA or OpenCL. Older techniques like simple DirectX/OpenGL pixel/fragment shaders should work just fine as well. Some links I found, maybe they could help you: Efficient GPU-Based Texture Interpolation using Uniform B-Splines ...


5

Using this (Thanks to Ahmet Kakıcı who found this), I figured out how to add Bicubic Interpolation. For those also looking for the answer, here is what I used: private float CubicPolate( float v0, float v1, float v2, float v3, float fracy ) { float A = (v3-v2)-(v0-v1); float B = (v0-v1)-A; float C = v2-v0; float D = v1; return ...


5

second derivative of cubic B-Spline is continuous while that of bicubic interpolation is not. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spline_interpolation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cubic_interpolation http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/485935/piecewise-interpolation-with-derivatives-that-is-also-twice-differentiable


4

(EDIT) Cubic() is a cubic spline function Example: Texscale is sampling window size coefficient. You can start with 1.0 value. vec4 filter(sampler2D texture, vec2 texcoord, vec2 texscale) { float fx = fract(texcoord.x); float fy = fract(texcoord.y); texcoord.x -= fx; texcoord.y -= fy; vec4 xcubic = cubic(fx); vec4 ycubic ...


4

I decided to take a minute to dig my old Perforce activities and found the missing cubic() function; enjoy! :) vec4 cubic(float v) { vec4 n = vec4(1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0) - v; vec4 s = n * n * n; float x = s.x; float y = s.y - 4.0 * s.x; float z = s.z - 4.0 * s.y + 6.0 * s.x; float w = 6.0 - x - y - z; return vec4(x, y, z, w); }


3

t is any number between 0 and 1. p(0) is the starting point of the curve and p(1) is end for one dimension. for example by choosing sufficiently small dt you can plot a smooth curve like this dt = 0.01; for(var t = 0; t < 1 ; t += dt) { draw( p(t) ); }


3

you could have a linear interpolation and a cubic interpolation and interpolate between the two interpolation functions. ie. cubic(t) = cubic interpolation linear(t) = linear interpolation cubic_to_linear(t) = linear(t)*t + cubic(t)*(1-t) linear_to_cubic(t) = cubic(t)*t + linear(t)*(1-t) where t ranges from 0...1


3

Be careful with going the GPU route. If your convolution kernel is too fast, you're going to end up being IO bound. You won't know for sure which is the fastest unless you implement both. GPU Gems 2 has a chapter on Fast Third-Order Texture Filtering which should be a good starting point for your GPU solution. A combination of Intel Threading Building ...


3

There's the Intel IPP libraries, which use SIMD internally for faster processing. The Intel IPP also uses OpenMP, if configured, you can gain benefit of relatively easy multiprocessing. These libraries do support bicubic interpolation and are payware (you buy a development license but redistribs are free).


3

I actually ended up using Delauney Triangulation to break down the fields into 3 dimensional X,Y,Z surfaces with an Identifier. Then given a set of (Identity,Z) pairs I form a field line from each surface, and from these lines compute the polygon formed from the shortest edges between lines. This gives me an area of potential x,y coordinates.


3

Honestly, cubic interpolation isn't generally much better for audio than linear. A simple suggestion for improving your linear interpolation would be to use an antialiasing filter (before or after the interpolation, depending on whether you are shortening the signal or lengthening it). Another option (though more computationally expensive) is ...


3

I must say, that 7x7 seems more logical to me since one point is inserted in the middle between neighbouring points. However, if you insist on 8x8 you can create a coordinate grid and resample it: [mgx mgy] = meshgrid(1:4,1:4); [mgx2 mgy2] = meshgrid(linspace(1,4,8), linspace(1,4,8)); B= interp2(mgx, mgy, A, mgx2, mgy2, 'cubic')


3

I'm having some issues with IE10 downsampling of images too, and as you pointed out, that proprietary css style is not supported anymore in IE10 (moreover since IE9). There are some js related fixes like this, but, for your specific case, I would recommend the use of a svg logo (if you don't need to support IE8), instead of png. You can find good information ...


3

As you can see at this answer the bicubic kernel is not non-negative, therefore, in some cases the negative coefficients may dominate and produce negative outputs. You should also note that Matlab is using 'Antialiasing' by default, which has an effect on the result: I = zeros(9);I(5,5)=1; imresize(I,[5 5],'bicubic') %// with antialiasing ans = 0 ...


3

You're going to want to read in the data, identify all the rows where the last column is unknown. Then using the "good" data points you can construct a 2D interpolant (f(x,y)) to sample at the unknown points. You'll have to use griddata rather than interp2 since your data is scattered. You'll want to use the linear interpolation method (the default). The ...


2

There must be something wrong with the bicubic code you're using. Here's my result with Python: The black border around the outside is where the result was outside of the palette due to ringing. Here's the program that produced the above: from PIL import Image im = Image.open(r'c:\temp\temp.png') # convert the image to a grayscale with 8 values from 10 ...


2

One way to do it is to define a GetPixel() function: GetPixel(int x, int y, int channel) { if (x >= 0 && x <= width-1) if (y >=0 && y <= height-1) return QueriedPixelFromImage(x,y,channel); return 0; // out of bounds } You will replace d0 = in[(y - 1 + jj) * bytes_per_row + (x - 1) * components + k] by ...


2

Aside from mixing floating point and integer arithmetic, I suspect you're getting numeric overflow / underflow with some of your intermediate values. One easy fix is to just be consistent and use floating point throughout. Right now you have: unsigned char C[5] = { 0 }; for (unsigned i = 0; i < dest_height; ++i) { for (unsigned j = 0; j < ...


2

One thing you could do to speed this up is use texelFetch() instead of floor()/texture(), so the hardware doesn't waste time doing any filtering. Though hardware filtering is quite fast which is partly why I linked the gpu gems article. There's also now a textureSize() function which saves passing the values in yourself. GLSL has a very aggressive ...


2

Bicubic interpolation uses negative weights (this sometimes results in overshoot when filtering). In this example, the weights used are: -1/8 5/8 5/8 -1/8 These weights sum to 1, but give larger weight to the middle samples and smaller (negative) weights to the outer samples. Using these weights we get the observed values, e.g. 0.375 = 5/8*1 -1/8*2 1.5 ...


2

I suggest don't use this function because it was written very bad. You need to make two convolutions: at first by X coordinate then by Y. In this function all these convolutions are making in the same time that leads to very slow work. And if You would look at jj loop body you could notice that all second part of body begining from "d0 = C[0] - C[1];" could ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible