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19

Because N + N/2 + N/4 + ... = 2N.


15

A typical personal computer can do 10^8 calculations per second. And the world's fastest supercomputer does 10^16 calculations per second. So suppose you had an O(n) algorithm running on your laptop/desktop right now. And an O(n^2) algorithm running on the world's fastest supercomputer simultaneously. And if n = 10^10, Running time on the PC = 10^10 / ...


12

Often, the answer is 'yes'. If you increase the problem size by 10 and the time goes up by 10, you're probably correct to assume O(N). However, the number is unlikely to quite so beautiful. If you go from 1,000 to 10,000, an O(N.logN) algorithm goes up by a factor of 13, roughly (see the bc below). That's not far off 10, and you might mistakenly think that ...


9

Time complexity is O(2n). The bottle neck is : for(int j = 0; j < k; j++){ count++; } Since k increases exponentially every iteration of i. In the i'th iteration, k = 2i-1. This means iterating all values from j to k is O(k) = O(2i). Now, sum it all up for all iterations: 20 + 21 + 22 + ... + 2n-1 = 2n - 1 Where last equality comes from sum of ...


7

The purpose of the Big-O notation is to find what is the dominant factor in the asymptotic behavior of a function as the value tends towards the infinity. As we walk through the function domain, some factors become more important than others. Imagine f(n) = n^3+n^2. As n goes to infinity, n^2 becomes less and less relevant when compared with n^3. But ...


7

int sum = 0; for(int n = N; n > 0; n/=2) for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) sum++ This is O(N), the inner loop runs total of N + N/2 + N/4 + ... + 1 times, this sum converges to 2N when N->infinity, and thus it is O(N). int sum = 0; for(int i = 1; i < N; i*=2) for(int j = 0; j < i; j++) sum++ This is very similar to case1, ...


6

From a (complexity) theory point of view, the coefficients represent hardware details that we can ignore. Specifically, the Linear Speedup Theorem dictates that for any problem we can always throw an exponentially increasing amount of hardware (money) at a computer to get a linear boost in speed. Therefore, modulo expensive hardware purchases two ...


6

The inner loop iterates over the array of all primes below sqrt(i). So you have to calculate the number of elements in that array. In the case of an array of primes, you have to use approximations for π(i), the number of primes below i. You can approximate them by x/ln(x) or (much better) by li(x). More details here. For analysis the x/ln(x) would be ...


6

The set o(1) is not empty. It is first important to remember that f(x) is in o(g(x)) if and only if lim_x->infinity { f(x) / g(x)} = 0 For non zero g(x) But, more important, what is the set of candidate f(x)? Some define it over all real functions [1], i.e. f:R->RU{U} (Where U is undefined for some values of the functions). This means, we can ...


6

On the contrary to the other answer, I will say "no". However, you can get a pretty good guess (not even an estimate as it is not appropriate here). This is probably what is meant by "often". The thing is, that you never know the constant factors. Big Oh is asymptomatic behaviour (in infinity), this is a very very useful to drop everything except for the ...


5

Hint: log_a(n) == ln(n) / ln(a).


5

Wouldn't it suffice to give a special input and show that the running time is at least f(n)? Yes, assuming you are talking about the worst case complexity. If you are talking about worst case complexity - and you have proved it is running in O(f(n)), if you find an input that "worse" than C*f(n)) for some constant C - you effectively proved that the ...


5

No, divide and conquer doesn't guarantee O(nlogn) performance. It all depends on how the problem gets simplified on each recursion. In the merge sort algorithm, the original problem is divided into two halves. Then an O(n) operation is performed on the results. That's where the O(n...) comes from. Each of the two sub-operations now has its own n that is ...


4

The rule for changing base of a logarithm is: log_b(n) = log_a(n) / log_a(b). This immediately implies log_b(n) = O(log_a(n)) and by symmetry log_a(n) = O(log_b(n)).


4

The problem, as I understand it, is that we want to find the sums a1 + b1 a1 + b2 ... a1 + bn a2 + b1 a2 + b2 ... a2 + bn ... ... ... ... an + b1 an + b2 ... an + bn and print them in sorted order. The restriction is to use only O (n) memory and O (n^2 log n) time in the process. Consider the above table as n lists (lines) of n ...


4

The Master theorem doesn't even apply, so not being able to use it isn't much of a restriction. An approach which works here is to guess upper and lower bounds, and then prove these guesses by induction if the guesses are good. a(0) = 0 a(1) = 1 a(2) = 3 a(3) = 10 a(4) = 41 A reasonable guess for a lower bound is that a(n) >= n! for n>1. This is true for ...


4

If you would talk about drawing the line, I'd simply like to deliver like :- The code's complexity :- O(N*o(X)) As soon as one get's to judge the complexity of the function X(N), one can simply substitute in the formula. Till then, it will be a shorthand but useful notation all in all along with satisfying the loop's complexity.


4

After taking into account your original question as well as your comments (and, I suppose, some inference on my part), your requirements are as follows: A list-like data structure with O(1) random access O(1) insertion at the end (amortized) O(1) deletion at the end (amortized) O(1) max The most straight-forward solution (keeping track of the max element ...


3

Big O notation describes the limiting behavior of a function when the argument tends towards a particular value or infinity. So yes, if you have a polynomial, only the biggest thing counts, and constants and factors don't matter. For example, a function with complexity 4n² + 999n + 5 is in O(n²). And in your case, yes, that means it's just O(n log n).


3

Let's look at an example: You have an algorithm with an order of O(n^3). You're running that algorithm on a processor that can handle n = 10 in 100 milliseconds. If n goes to 10000, that processor would need 1158 days. Getting a processor twice as fast would only cut that down to 579 days. Even if you were able to get a processor ten times as fast, it ...


3

Question 1 In the solution two you have Sort Sort Single loop The complexity of the loop is O(n), so we have to look at the sort. According to PHP, it uses Quicksort, so the complexity is O(n log n) Note: Like most PHP sorting functions, sort() uses an implementation of » Quicksort. Therefore, we have O(n log n) + O(n log n) + O(n). We take the ...


3

Since Θ is a tight bound, there is no better simplification for it, if some function f(n) is both in Θ(h(n)) AND in Θ(g(n)) it means that Θ(h(n)) = Θ(g(n)), so for any other function you will find, the information gain over Θ(n^2) in your example is none. When dealing with substraction of n^k - n^m, where k>m, you can simply "throw" n^m away, when ...


3

This loop executes n/2 times on the average: On the first iteration this executes up to n-1 times, because j starts at 1 On the second iteration this executes up to n-2 times, because j starts at 2 On the third iteration this executes up to n-3 times, because j starts at 3 ... On the last iteration this executes zero times, because i+1 is equal to the ...


3

Yes, you can say that's an O(nlogn). When you are trying to estimate complexity of your algorithm you start with all parts (choose the worst operation which is in each part and ignore the fast ones - hey it's just an estimate). First part is nlogn and the second part is n. Beacause you don't want/can/need it to be accurate. O(nlogn + n) - or - O(nlogn) + ...


3

A division is just a multiplication by the multiplicative inverse, so n^3/a == n^3 * a^-1, and you can handle it the same way as any other coefficient. With regards to substraction a*n^3 - b*n^2 <= a*n^3, so it is also in O(n^3). Also, a*n^3 - b*n^2 >= a/2 * n^3 for large enough values of n, and it is also in Omega(n^3). A more detailed explanation ...


3

You simply can't tell. There just isn't enough information. Saying that your function is linear is wrong unless X(N) is constant time. You could, however, measure the time that X(N) takes to complete for different input sizes. Often this will give you a rough estimate of how it behaves asymptotically.


3

In python you can something like that: import heapq a = [2, 1, 3] b = [4, 6, 5] a.sort() b.sort() def add_to_b(x): for v in b: yield v + x for v in heapq.merge(*[add_to_b(x) for x in a]): print v Result: 5 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 9 The idea is that we sort both arrays. Then adding to b an element of a defines a generator of increasing ...


3

outer loop runs until i*i >= N, that means it runs total of sqrt(N) times. For each iteration of outer loop, inner loop runs until j*j >= 4*N, similarly that means it runs sqrt(4N) = 2sqrt(N) times. For each iteration of middle loop, inner loop runs until k>=N*N, this means N^2 iterations. Increasing sum is done in constant time. Multiply the ...


3

Does any algorithm that is implemented with the use of the divide and conquer paradigm has time complexity of O(nlogn)? On average Quicksort and Mergesort have a time complexity of O(n log(n)), but it is not always necessarily like this. Big O Cheat Sheet Is it that the recursion part in the approach has the power to condense an algorithm that runs ...


2

for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) { // O(n) time complexity for (int j = 1; j < i; j++) { // O(n) time complexity for (int k = 1; k < j; k++) { // O(n) time complexity x++; } } } The first loop does n number of computations. Your second loop continues to go until i reaches its condition, which is n, and k continues ...



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