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447

Bigtable A Distributed Storage System for Structured Data Bigtable is a distributed storage system (built by Google) for managing structured data that is designed to scale to a very large size: petabytes of data across thousands of commodity servers. Many projects at Google store data in Bigtable, including web indexing, Google Earth, ...


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Sorted Strings Table (borrowed from google) is a file of key/value string pairs, sorted by keys


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It's something they've built themselves - it's called Bigtable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BigTable There is a paper by Google on the database: http://research.google.com/archive/bigtable.html


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The way I look at it, a relational database is a general purpose tool to hedge your bets. Modern computers are fast enough, and RDBMS' are well-optimized enough that you can grow to quite a respectable size on a single box. By choosing an RDBMS you are giving yourself very flexible access to your data, and the ability to have powerful correctness ...


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Bigtable is Google's invention to deal with the massive amounts of information that the company regularly deals in. A Bigtable dataset can grow to immense size (many petabytes) with storage distributed across a large number of servers. The systems using Bigtable include projects like Google's web index and Google Earth. According to Google whitepaper on the ...


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When you have extremely large data, you probably want to avoid joins. This is because the overhead of an individual key lookup is relatively large (the service needs to figure out which node(s) to query, and query them in parallel and wait for responses). By overhead, I mean latency, not throughput limitation. This makes joins suck really badly as you'd ...


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Google has provided function to do that: http://code.google.com/appengine/docs/python/datastore/modelclass.html#Model_get_or_insert Model.get_or_insert(key_name, **kwds) Attempts to get the entity of the model's kind with the given key name. If it exists, get_or_insert() simply returns it. If it doesn't exist, a new entity with the given kind, name, and ...


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You're starting from a faulty assumption. Data warehousing does not normalize data the same way that a transaction application normalizes. There are not "lots" of joins. There are relatively few. In particular second and third Normal Form violations are not a "problem", since data warehouses are rarely updated. And when they are updated, it's ...


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There's no built-in constraint for making sure a value is unique. You can do this however: query = MyModel.all(keys_only=True).filter('unique_property', value_to_be_used) entity = query.get() if entity: raise Exception('unique_property must have a unique value!') I use keys_only=True because it'll improve the performance slightly by not fetching the ...


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Could be a bit of both ;-) If you're doing 400 queries on the Awards table, one for each result returned for a query on the mapping table, then I would expect that to be painful. The 1000-result limit on queries is there because BigTable thinks that returning 1000 results is at the limit of its ability to operate in a reasonable time. Based on the ...


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In any database context, a "commit" is the application of a single transaction to the DB. A commit log is a record of transactions. It's used to keep track of what's happening, and help with e.g. disaster recovery - generally, all commits are written to the log before being applied, so transactions that were in flight when the server went down can be ...


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Designing a bigtable schema is an open process, and basically requires you to think about: The access patterns you will be using and how often each will be used The relationships between your types What indices you are going to need The write patterns you will be using (in order to effectively spread load) GAE's datastore automatically denormalizes your ...


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As others have mentioned, Google uses a homegrown solution called BigTable and they've released a few papers describing it out into the real world. The Apache folks have an implementation of the ideas presented in these papers called HBase. HBase is part of the larger Hadoop project which according to their site "is a software platform that lets one easily ...


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Is my data model wrong? Am I doing the lookups wrong? Yes and yes, I'm afraid. As far as your data model goes, the best way by far to handle this is to store the sum against the User record, and update it when a user gains/loses an award. There's really no point in counting their score every single time when the vast majority of the time, it will be ...


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The NoSQL Database site summarizes the concept like this: Next Generation Databases mostly address some of the points: being non-relational, distributed, open-source and horizontal scalable. The original intention has been modern web-scale databases. The movement began early 2009 and is growing rapidly. Often more characteristics apply ...


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"An SSTable provides a persistent,ordered immutable map from keys to values, where both keys and values are arbitrary byte strings. Operations are provided to look up the value associated with a specified key, and to iterate over all key/value pairs in a specified key range. Internally, each SSTable contains a sequence of blocks (typically each block is 64KB ...


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I am not an expert yet, but I've been playing with Cassandra for a few days now, and I have some answers for you: Don't worry about amount of data , it's irrelevant with systems like Cassandra, if you have $$$ for a large hardware cluster. Some of these systems (Cassandra, for example) claims to be able to do range queries. Would I be able to ...


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There are a number of well known ways to represent trees in databases; each of them have their pros and cons. Here are the most common: Adjacency list, where each node stores the ID of its parent. Materialized path, which is the strategy Keyur describes. This is also the approach used by entity groups (eg, parent entities) in App Engine. It's also more or ...


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NoSQL is an umbrella term for all the databases that are different from 'the standard' SQL databases, such as MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL. These 'standard' SQL databases are all relational databases, feature the SQL query language and adhere to the ACID properties. These properties basically boil down to consistency. A NoSQL database is ...


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Distributed databases aren't quite as naive as Orion implies; there has been quite a bit of work done on optimizing fully relational queries over distributed datasets. You may want to look at what companies like Teradata, Netezza, Greenplum, Vertica, AsterData, etc are doing. (Oracle got in the game, finally, as well, with their recent announcement; ...


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Spanner is Google's globally distributed relational database management system (RDBMS), the successor to BigTable. Google claims it is not a pure relational system because each table must have a primary key. Here is the link of the paper. Spanner is Google's scalable, multi-version, globally-distributed, and synchronously-replicated database. It is ...


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Google's BigTable and other similar projects (ex: CouchDB, HBase) are database systems that are oriented so that data is mostly denormalized (ie, duplicated and grouped). The main advantages are: - Join operations are less costly because of the denormalization - Replication/distribution of data is less costly because of data independence (ie, if you want ...


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A JOIN is a pure relational term and not all databases are relational. Other database models have other ways to build relations. Network databases use the endless chains of find a key - fetch the reference - find a key which should be programmed with a common programming language. The code can be run on the application side or on the server side, but it's ...


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Both redis and cassandra can be used as a key value store. The difference is in speed, scale and reliability. Redis works best as a single server, where the entire data set resides in memory. Cassandra can handle data sets that don't fit in memory, and data sets that don't fit on a single machine. As part of distributing over multiple machines, cassandra ...


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... are there books or academic research papers on designing databases for bigtable and similar database paradigms? Well Bigtable is essentially a database itself, so I take it that your question is more on how to model and to some extent design your schema in these Bigtable like databases. More specifically you would like to know how to do this ...


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There's not much recent literature on non-relational database design that I'm aware of - though you might gain some valuable insights by digging up old papers from before the relational paradigm 'won'. The basic insight of databases like Bigtable is, of course, that in web-apps and other read-heavy applications, given the availability of cheap disk storage, ...


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Good overview of the nosql world: http://www.vineetgupta.com/2010/01/nosql-databases-part-1-landscape/


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I'm not too familiar with them (I've only read the same blog/news/examples as everyone else) but my take on it is that they chose to sacrifice a lot of the normal relational DB features in the name of scalability - I'll try explain. Imagine you have 200 rows in your data-table. In google's datacenter, 50 of these rows are stored on server A, 50 on B, and ...


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Availability in this case means that in the event of a network partition, the server that a client connects to may not be able to guarantee the level of consistency that the client expects (or that the system is configured to provide). Assuming that you have 3 nodes, A, B, and C, in a hypothetical distributed system. A, B, and C are each running in their ...



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