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820

The bit shifting operators do exactly what their name implies. They shift bits. Here's a brief (or not-so-brief) introduction to the different shift operators. The Operators >> is the arithmetic (or signed) right shift operator. >>> is the logical (or unsigned) right shift operator. << is the left shift operator, and meets the ...


86

Lets say we have a single byte: 0110110 Applying a single left Bitshift gets us: 1101100 The leftmost zero was shifted out of the byte, and a new zero was appended to the right end of the byte. The bits don't rollover, they are discarded, that means if you left shift 1101100 and then right shift it, you won't get the same result back. Shifting left ...


45

Bitwise operations, including bit shift, are fundamental to low-level hw or embedded programming. If you read a spec for a device or even some binary file formats, you will see bytes, words, and dwords, broken up into non-byte aligned bitfields, which contain various values of interest. Accessing these bit-fields for reading/writing is the most common ...


23

It's a type issue. If you cast the 0 to unsigned it'll be fine: unsigned mask = ~ (unsigned) 0 >> 1; printf("%u\n", mask); Edit per comments: or use unsigned literal notation, which is much more succinct. :) unsigned mask = ~0u >> 1; printf("%u\n", mask);


21

One gotcha is that the following is implementation dependent (according to the ANSI standard): char x = -1; x >> 1; x can now be 127 (01111111) or still -1 (11111111). In practice, it's usually the latter.


13

Sign extension What's happening is ~0 is an int with all bits set (-1). Now you right shift by 1; since it's -1, sign extension keeps the highest bit set so it remained signed (this is not what you were expecting). Then it's converted to unsigned like you expect.


9

For this sort of thing I recommend that you take a look at the awesome page Bit Twiddling Hacks. Here is just one example solution taken from that page: Reverse the bits in a byte with 3 operations (64-bit multiply and modulus division) unsigned char b; // reverse this (8-bit) byte b = (b * 0x0202020202ULL & 0x010884422010ULL) % 1023; And as ...


8

For that you have to make enums like : enum STATE { STATE_A = 1, STATE_B = 2, STATE_C = 4 }; i.e. enum element value should be in power of 2 to select valid case or if statement. So when you do like: void foo( int state) { if ( state & STATE_A ) { // do something } if ( state & STATE_B ) { // do something } if ( ...


8

i++ is a postfix increment - it increments i, then essentially returns the old value of i. The equivalent prefix operator, ++i, would return the "updated" value, but that's not what's being used here. i+=2 works differently however, it's essentially equivalent to i+2, since it does return the updated value. However, I think where the confusion arises is ...


8

The asterisk (*) can be used for dereferencing (unary) or multiplication (binary). The ampersand (&) can be used for referencing (unary) or bitwise AND (binary). The plus/minus signs (+/-) can be used for identity/negation (unary) or addition/subtraction (binary). But, as others pointed out, those are symbols shared by different operators. Each of ...


7

Bitwise operators behave well only with powers of 2: 0010 | 0100 ------ 0110 // both bits are set 0110 & 0100 ------ 0100 // nonzero, i.e. true: the flag is set If you try to do the same with arbitrary numbers, you'll get unexpected results: 0101 // 5 | 1100 // 12 ------ 1101 // 13 Which contains the possible (arbitrary) numbers ...


7

[http://www.cppreference.com/wiki/operator_precedence] (Found by googling "C++ operator precedence") That page tells us that &&, in group 13, has higher precedence than || in group 14, so the expression is equivalent to a || (b && c). Unfortunately, the wikipedia article ...


7

The method reduce in the interface Stream is overloaded. The parameters for the method with three arguments are: identity accumulator combiner The combiner supports parallel execution. Apparently, it is not used for sequential streams. However, there is no such guarantee. If you change your streams into parallel stream, I guess you will see a difference: ...


6

It's implementation defined whether a right shift is an arithmetic or a logical shift. In your case, it appears to be an arithmetic shift, so you're getting sign extension in the >> half of your expression. You need to put an unsigned cast or assignment in to get the behaviour you want. unsigned int y = x; return ( y << offset ) | ( y >> ...


6

dynamic d1 = d + "add it"; That's not a binary operation, that's string concatenation. Documented in the MSDN article for DynamicObject.TryBinaryOperation(), the Add operation has this description: An addition operation without overflow checking, for numeric operands. The binder already knows how to concatenate strings. All that's required is to ...


6

|| and && are logical operators in C++, not bitwise operators. They only return true/false. The corresponding binary operators are | and &. Try: tmp = ((dynamicINT << 1) | (dynamicINT >> 31) & 0x7FFFFFFF);


5

Your while loop will not terminate if val is >= 2^31. This is because k == 2^31 is still <= val but 2^31 << 1 == 2^32 overflows and becomes 0. Which is still smaller than the limit. You could extend your condition to break if k == 0 too, then the problem should disappear. (^ means exponentiation not xor in this post)


5

Your static_cast isn't doing anything. What you should be doing is: if(static_cast<int>(maxTotal) % 2 == 1) Variables in C++ cannot change types. Static cast returns the casted value it does not change the input variable's type, so you have to use it directly or assign it. int iMaxTotal = static_cast<int>(maxTotal); if(iMaxTotal % 2 == 1) ...


5

Your code has a couple of issues: Don't do that; it's confusing {} is not an empty block; it's an object literal. "" or 0 or 42 would have the same effect. The && operator will do what you want.


4

From here: a || (b && c) This is the default precedence.


4

Try this: unsigned mask = (unsigned) ~0 >> 1; printf("%08x\n", mask); The RHS of the assignment is treated as a signed quantity unless you cast it, which means you were seeing sign extension without the cast. (I also changed your print statement to display the number in hex, which is easier for me to decode.)


4

You're using *prand, but not initializing prand.


4

You define ity as vector::iterator y is const and returns a const_iterator. What is more important is: Don't use binary_function. The adapters have been deprecated. Also, your function does not do what you want. *itx returns the value stored at the position pointed to by itx and you use it to index into the you intend to return vector. I would write this ...


4

You need to make the operator const: bool operator < (const someClass&) const; without that, only the RHS is const.


4

No, there isn't. Every operator is either unary, binary, or ternary. Some unary and binary operators happen to use the same symbol: * for dereference and multiplication - for negation and subtraction + for identity and addition & for address-of and bitwise "and" But unary and binary * are still distinct operators that happen to be spelled the same ...


3

Yes, null, undefined, 0, "", will all resolve to false, when treated as a boolean (which the || operator does), and so, all browser will use the latter. This behavior is perfectly safe.


3

EDIT to fix the bug that @schnaader found: What it does? This code probably wants to rotate val leftwards (clockwise) by 6 bits and form the ones-complement sum (edit: not the product, as I'd said before) -- the xor -- of that rotated value and the current value of m_Hash to yield a new m_Hash. That new m_Hash will be used the next time AddHash( ) is called. ...


3

What the code does It takes the last 26 bits of val and combines it with m_Hash using XOR. After that, it combines this with the first 6 bits of val. So an integer with 32 bits length will be reduced to 26 bits. According to the pigeonhole principle, this is not reversible. HasHash function So you won't be able to create a HasHash function even if you ...


3

Usually arguments that are combined that way are flags (a value with a single bit set) with a decimal value of 1, 2, 4, 8, etc. Assuming that One and Two follow this rule, you cannot use a switch to check for both. Switches only follow one path. Your combined argument does not equal One or Two, but a combination of them (1 | 2 == 3). You can check to see ...


3

The easiest way to implement a parser is by the method of Recursive Descent. Make sure to give binary minus a higher priority than unary minus, like in the referenced site: E --> | E "+" E | E "-" E | "-" E | E "*" E | E "/" E | E "^" E | "(" E ")" | v



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