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4

I'd call your understanding not quite correct. The big-O notation does not say anything about an exact amount of steps done. A notation O(log n) means that something is approximately proportional to log n, but not neccesarily equal. If you say that the number of steps to search for a value in a BST is O(log n), this means that it is approximately C*log n ...


4

When you say nodeToBeDeleted = null; inside the delete method, you are not really causing the Node returned by the getNode method to start pointing to a null. Java is always pass-by-value. This means that you can't make a reference passed to a method point to a new memory location inside the method. Similarly, you can't make a reference returned by a ...


4

When you set nodeToBeDeleted to null, you only set the value of the local variable that holds the reference to the actual object. The actual object is not deleted in any way. With the code you've shown here, to delete the node, you should find its parent and set the reference to this node (leftChild or rightChild) to null. This will ensure that the object ...


4

You have to delete the node from the tree and not locally in your program. Node<Integer> nodeToBeDeleted = getNode(deletionNodeValue); gives you a copy of the Node in the tree. nodeToBeDeleted = null; sets this copy to null. The connection to the tree is not deleted because it is part of the node object. To delete the connection you would have to ...


3

Let's look at your function. struct Node *delMin(struct Node **root) You take a pointer to node pointer as argument and return the new head. That is unnecessary. Returning the head is only useful if it isn't updated otherwise. Your pointer-to-node-pointer approach caters for that (well, it should, but it doesn't), so that the return value is free for ...


3

It seems that size counts the total number of nodes. If you want to compute the (maximum) height instead, you want something like this: height :: Tree x -> Int height (Leaf _) = 1 height (Node x y) = 1 + (height x `max` height y) If you just replace size with height, the isBalanced code should work as before. Whether this fixes your problem remains to ...


3

I think the solution to your problem lies in the comment by @Praetorian: You probably want myfile << random_integer << '\n';. Otherwise stoi will throw out_of_range, which is probably the cause of the crash. I have a few generic suggestions regarding your function. Separate your function into two -- one for writing to the file -- one ...


3

The average case time complexity will be O(log n) and the worst case would be O(n). To understand the O(log n) complexity you can refer What does O(log n) mean exactly? This image will explain you how part: I will also recommend to go through the wiki for details.


3

The difference is that in the first version you pass the pointer by value, meaning it gets copied and in the function you only modify the copy. In the second version you pass the pointer by reference, which means changes to it will be reflected outside of the function.


3

It's not really easy / intuitive to recursively compute max and min at the same time in the same function. I would even say it's not possible, because those are two completely different traversals. You should have a function to get the minimum, a function to get the maximum, and call each of them inside Find_Min_Max. This would be a possible approach: int ...


3

Try this code: public AlbumNode getAlbum(AlbumNode node, String name) { if (node == null) { // this checks the base case return null; // your original code failed for a null root } else { if (node.getName().equals(name)) { return node; } else { AlbumNode result = getAlbum(node.left, name); ...


3

See operator precedence, where -> is having precedence over *. You should use (*root)->name as argument to your strncmp() call.


2

The code should capture the node which has result as: public AlbumNode getAlbum(AlbumNode root, String name) { AlbumNode result; if(root.getName().equals(name)){ return root; } if (root != null) { if(root.left != null) result = getAlbum(root.left, name); if(result != null) { return result; } ...


2

Your analysis is correct, the sample solution checks for None twice for each node and your solution checks only once, otherwise they are equivalent. I’d also say that your solution is more readable, but that’s somewhat subjective. As an enhancement, you can get rid of the first line in the body of your function, by calling the argument of the function ...


2

remove_helper is attempting to change the value of the inRoot parameter. However inRoot is passed by value, so any changes made in your function are not reflected in the calling function. Change the remove_helper function to take inRoot by reference, and then it will be able to modify the value of the parameter used in the calling function: ...


2

First, you can get the left most entry by modifying the search function: private Node search( Movie m, Node n){ if ( m.compareTo( n.getData() ) == 0 ){ if(n.getLeft() != null){//Go left to continue searching Node node = search(m, n.getLeft()); if(node != null) return node; } return n; } ...


2

Your current inorder traversal using recursion to perform the task. That makes it difficult to run more than one at the same time. So, first I would re-write the method to use an explicit stack (example here in C#). Now, duplicate all of the state so that we perform traversals of both trees at the same time. At any point where we're ready to yield a value ...


1

To answer "which of the roots is actually returned" ... they all are. The question is where are they returned to and what is the final value. When you traced forwards through your code you saw where the recursive function call was executed and understood that you created a new copy of the function with different values and traced your way from the top ...


1

I believe the "trick" to understanding recursive functions is to first understand non-recursive functions and then realise that recursive functions work exactly the same. Imagine that you have one function for each level of the tree - deleteNode_1, deleteNode_2, deleteNode_3, and so on. You would make your first call by passing the root of your tree to ...


1

In delMin this code section if (current->m_ch == 0) b4Current->m_ls = NULL; else { if (b4Current == NULL) *root = current->m_rs; else b4Current->m_ls = current->m_rs; } there is no guarantee that b4Current is not NULL. Consider the case where the root node has m_ch == 0 and m_ls == NULL. You will take the if ...


1

if ( !isdigit(c) && !ispunct(c) && c != '\n') name[i++]=c; That will include the whitespace at the end of the name. So you need to search for "Mark Ronson " (note whitespace at end). Or better still, you should write your code to not include that last whitespace in the name. BTW, a general tip on debugging. If you used a debugger or ...


1

You talk about binary search trees but the code you have shown does a binary search on a sorted array. That is not the same thing. One way of using your binary search would be to put the X,Y and Z values together in an array or custom struct. Something like: struct Vertex { float X; float Y; float Z; }; Modify your binary search function so that ...


1

It will still be O(log n). Think this way, it will search by continuously halving till it cannot locate.


1

Re-balancing may make a sibling of a node its new parent, but it can not change the relative order. Keep in mind that the red-black tree is a binary search tree and thus it should keep elements smaller than a given element in its left subtree and elements greater than it in its right subtree. Swapping the children of a vertex will reverse the inequality.


1

You can achieve this by recursive. public class TreeNodeDemo { List<Integer> values = new ArrayList<Integer>(); public List<Integer> storeKeyValues(TreeNode root) { treeTravel(root); return values; } private void treeTravel(TreeNode node) { if (node != null) { treeTravel(node.left); ...


1

To "randomize" your List, use Collections.shuffle(): List<Movie> movies = new ArrayList<>(); do { //... // populate `movies` movies.add(new Movie(....)); } while (read.hasNext()); Collections.shuffle(movies); // shuffle for (Movie m : movies) { // populate the tree tree.add(m); } This will ...


1

Disclaimer: OP has asked for searching all the movies which has specific rating and it may help him. As per his comment I would appreciate if you can look over that and my search in BST to see why I don't get the output of all the movies when I search by rating. As it seems your tree is using name of the movie as key and you want to search based on rating, ...


1

Top hit algorithms use a min-heap (PriorityQueue in Java), but there should be some size checking in your algorithm. Suppose each item has a score, and you want to collect the 10 items with the highest score. PriorityQueue efficiently exposes the item with the lowest score: PriorityQueue<DataObject> top = new PriorityQueue(10, comparator); for ...


1

Well to begin with you can just have the first element as your root and then add any element that is less than root to its left and greater than it to its right and so on. 18 7 22 23 25 37 This makes sense when the numbers that are inserted are in random order, else in case or sorted ...


1

I guess this should do the trick: traverse(BinaryTree *root) { if (!root) return; cout << p->data << " "; if (root->left ) traverseL(root->left ); //special function for outer left if (root->right) traverseR(root->right); //special function for outer right } traverseL(BinaryTree *p) { cout << p->data << ...



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