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4

You have not followed the specifications correctly. For one thing, your rebalance operation increases the size of the tree. For another, the result is not always a binary search tree. You must understand how these trees work before you attempt to implement them. There is just no way around that. I advise you to study your text (or wikipedia) and try ...


3

One solution is to maintain two trees; one where a == b and one where a != b. For most functions you will probably need to call in to both trees but this will end up as the same big-O complexity since 2*O(log n) -> O(log n).


2

If a node has no left or right node, you know that the deepest full level is 1 - the node itself. If it has left and right nodes, recurse and choose the smaller. highestFull(BinaryNodeX<Comparable> *t) { if ( ! t->left || ! t->right ) return 1; return 1 + std::min( highestFull(t->left), highestFull(t->right) ); }


2

It seems that size counts the total number of nodes. If you want to compute the (maximum) height instead, you want something like this: height :: Tree x -> Int height (Leaf _) = 1 height (Node x y) = 1 + (height x `max` height y) If you just replace size with height, the isBalanced code should work as before. Whether this fixes your problem remains to ...


2

template <class Type> int bstree<Type>::count(treeNode* sroot){ int ret = 0; if ( sroot ) { ret = sroot->count; ret += count(sroot->left); ret += count(sroot->right); } return ret; }


1

Re-balancing may make a sibling of a node its new parent, but it can not change the relative order. Keep in mind that the red-black tree is a binary search tree and thus it should keep elements smaller than a given element in its left subtree and elements greater than it in its right subtree. Swapping the children of a vertex will reverse the inequality.


1

The iterative in-order traversal approach makes this pretty easy. Increment a counter whenever a node is popped from the stack. When the counter is equal to x, return the value of the node. Integer valueAtPosition(int x, Node root) { int count = 0; List<Node> stack = new ArrayList<>(); Node node = root; while (!stack.isEmpty() || node != ...


1

You can also use a counter in the recursive approach. However, you can't simply pass an int counter argument - you need all calls to see the "same" counter, so you will have to wrap it in a class (or, as in this case, an inner class): public static class Counter { private int value; public Counter(int initialValue) { value = initialValue; } public ...


1

recursive call in this code doesn't affect root node because you send root node at first time ( at that time root is NULL) and will enter the if condition otherwise will not affect root consider the following tree and call 2 -- (call insert and gave it root node, data -4) / \ 1 10 / 5 first call will check if root == NULL ---this if ...


1

As Aaron has pointed out you need to update the new key to which you will compare next. In your code if left node is null you inserted the node but if it is not null then you need to compare your key with the key of this new node. Where is this code? else if(key.compareTo(subroot.key) < 0){ if(subroot.left != null){ subroot = ...


1

There are two issues in your code. This performs a pointer comparison: if ( w == n.getData() ). You want to compare the data inside the objects, so instead write if ( w.equals(n.getData()) ). But now you still need to override Word.equals() so that it returns true whenever the two enclosed strings have the same contents. Like this: public boolean ...


1

As you mentioned, it is fairly easy to first find the number of nodes, doing any traversal: findNumNodes(node): if node == null: return 0 return findNumNodes(node.left) + findNumNodes(node.right) + 1 Then, with an inorder traversal that aborts when the node number is n/2: index=0 //id is a global variable / class variable, or any other ...


1

I'm not sure why you're passing an argument... wouldn't this do it? template <class Type> int treeNode<Type>::get_count() { int result = count; if (left) result += left->get_count(); if (right) result += right->get_count(); return result; } and then you call root->get_count();


1

Any object that cannot be reached by any live thread will be eligible for garbage collection. Based on that: Yes. No. Depends on the implementation of GC. Anyway, as a Java programmer, you can't control it. All you can do is have a trust that it will do its job just fine. Also, setting root to null is O(1), while nulling all references is O(n), where n ...


1

It is possible if for each subtree you stored the max possible value among the nodes of the tree. For a given tree, the max you require can be read off the root. During insertion/deletion/rotation, this property can be maintained in O(log n) time. There is a chapter called Augmenting Data Structures in Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen et al (commonly ...



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