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8

My comment upgraded to answer: There is no additional data used other than the method variables and the return value, so indeed, all memory is "cost of recursion". The total cost would hence be linearly proportional to the depth of the tree. In a balanced binary search tree, the depth is O(log n), so indeed, the space complexity would be O(log n) too. ...


8

You're not returning anything here: else { left->search(target); } it should be: else { return left->search(target); } You have the same error with right->search(target).


8

Your first entry will be your root. After that, anything that comes BEFORE your root (alphabetically in this case) will go to the left; AFTER will go to the right. Each of those produces a tree that can be traced from the bottom left to the bottom right in alphabetical order. As you can see this produces a tree which can be read bottom left up towards ...


6

Something like this should work, assuming tree_type is a node pointer: int countLevel(tree_type tree, int n) { if (tree == 0) return 0; if (n == 0) return 1; return countlevel(tree->left, n - 1) + countlevel(tree->right, n - 1); }


6

Basically, because a Node is not a AVLNode - you created it a Node, so it's a Node. If you'd created it as a AVLNode you could cast it to a Node, but not the other way round.


6

In your code you write: this.root = this.root.leftChild; add(newNode.data); This is probably wrong behavior? You should rewrite it to: add(this.root.leftChild,newNode); And then define a recursive method that looks whether the item should be stored left/right of the subroot. Something like: public void add(Node subroot, int data){ if(data > ...


5

The standard doesn't say how the containers are to be implemented, so you can't count on an RB or a AVL tree. In practice... the complexity constraints are such that I don't know of any other implementations which would fit the bill. But it's in the complexity constraints that you will find the answer: “logarithmic in general, but amortized constant ...


5

print_bst(tree->root); yeah, that's not going to work, main.c does not #include anything that can tell it that tree has a root element. The simplest way to fix this is move the definition of Tree into BST.h where main.c can access it.


5

The parameter head in insertNode shadows the member variable named head. However, while that's a really bad practice, the other answer is the true reason for your error, so please select his answer instead (once you get it working, of course). I'd recommend changing the signature of insertNode to void insertNode(int data, Node*& node) Also, you ...


5

Your insert method never assigns value to the root, so it remains null. If I understand your code, your insert should look like this : void insert(NODE nodeptr,int key){ if(root == null){ root = new NODE(key); return; } if(nodeptr == null){ insert (root, key); return; } if(key <= nodeptr.data){ ...


5

Well, in the interests of science, I implemented both AVL and splay trees in Python based on their respective Wikipedia articles. Assuming I didn't make a mistake somewhere, my finding is that there are no permutations of {1, ..., 7} that produce the same AVL and splay tree. I conjecture the same is true for all sets of size k > 3. As to the fundamental ...


5

It's probably that: node * createNode(int value); node is unknown at that point. Move the definition of node into your header file.


5

A heap will only let you search quickly for the minimum element (find it in O(1) time, remove it in O(log n) time). If you design it the other way, it will let you find the maximum, but you don't get both. To search for arbitrary elements quickly (in O(log n) time), you'll want the binary search tree.


5

void main(){ please, change to: int main(void) { and use NULL instead of 0 to compare pointers My debugger tells me: Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x00000000004007f0 in delete (root=0x0, data=5) at demo.c:47 47 if(root->right==0) Steps for debugging (using gdb): Compile using -g flag: gcc -std=c99 -pedantic -Wall ...


5

Yes, you can find the sum distance of the whole tree between every two node by DP in O(n). Briefly, you should know 3 things: cnt[i] is the node count of the ith-node's sub-tree dis[i] is the sum distance of every ith-node subtree's node to i-th node ret[i] is the sum distance of the ith-node subtree between every two node notice that ret[root] is answer ...


5

We can do this by traverse the tree two times. First, we need three array int []left which stored the sum of the distance of the left sub tree. int []right which stored the sum of the distance of the right sub tree. int []up which stored the sum of the distance of the parent tree (without the current sub tree). So, first traversal, for each node, we ...


5

Probably your way -which is the common way to code that in C- might be faster, but you should benchmark, because some C compilers (e.g. recent GCC when invoked with gcc -O2 ...) are able to optimize most tail calls as a jump (and passing values in registers). tail call optimization means that a call stack frame is reused by the callee (so the call stack ...


5

T represents any type, but in order to use > and < you need a type for which ordering makes sense. In scala words, it means to you have to put a bound of the type T, restricting it to all T for which an Ordering[T] exists. You can use a context bound, or equivalently require an implicit ord of type Ordering[TT]. trait GenericBST[+A] { def add[B ...


4

Assuming you want only the shortest path from the root-Node to the given value, you must compare the value with the current node's data and then decide whether to go left or right (and not go both directions). public static ArrayList<Integer> printPath(TreeNode node, ArrayList<Integer> path, int value) { if (node == null) return ...


4

trees[n] is the number of trees with exactly n nodes. There is 1 trees with 0 nodes, hence trees[0] == 1. For a given n > 0 there is a root node and two children trees whose total size is: n-1 trees[n-1] possible trees on the left and trees[0] on the right trees[n-2] possible trees on the left and trees[1] on the right ... trees[1] possible trees on ...


4

void Tree::addRecursive(Node * node, int value){ if (node == NULL){ node = new Node(value); } node here is a copy of the pointer you put in. You create a new Node and assign that to this copy, not the tree->top that you want to insert to.


4

Changes to the value of count don't propagate back up to the caller. You need to return the new count: def kthSmallestBST(node,k, count): if node is None or count >= k: return 0 else: count += kthSmallestBST(node.left, k, count) if count < k: print node.data count += 1 count += ...


4

It's a rather "functional programming" solution, but one way is to generate (lazily) the nodes in the tree in order, and then using itertools to just take the first k. def inorder(tree): if not tree: return for node in inorder(tree.left): yield node yield tree for node in inorder(tree.right): yield node def least(tree, k): return ...


4

Binary search can easily be adapted to find the first value greater than the key, so that with two searches you've found the range of values equal to the key. NumPy has actually already implemented that for you: >>> a = np.array([0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 5, 7]) >>> left = np.searchsorted(a, 2, side='left') >>> right = np.searchsorted(a, ...


4

The reason you're getting 12 is that your code returns twice the number of elements in the tree (of which there are 6). The fact that 12 also happens to be the first element is purely a coincidence. The return statement should read: return 1 + size(node.left) + size(node.right); i.e. this node plus the size of the left subtree plus the size of the right ...


3

A treap with implicit keys can perform all this operations in O(log n) time per query. The idea of implicit keys is pretty simple: we do not store any keys in nodes. Instead, we maintain subtrees' sizes for all nodes and find an appropriate position when we add or remove an element using this information. Here is my implementation: #include ...


3

From an OOP perspective I believe approach number 2 is the way to go. (Statics are in general often frowned upon in OOP.) As I understand it, the method uses this as root, and then traverses the rest of the tree without calling any instance methods? This isn't too bad considering that the other nodes are of the same class, which means that the code is ...


3

The elements of an std::set are stored in increasing order. No, you can't find the item at position N in logarithmic time though--it requires linear time. auto start = your_set.begin(); std::advance(start, N); In theory it could be done in logarithmic time by having each node of the tree store a count of the nodes to its left (i.e., preceding it in ...


3

If you take the pointer parameter by value: Node* node then modifying it: node = new Node(data); will change the local variable within the function; but not the caller's argument. This new value will be lost, and the tree will remain as it was. Passing by reference (that's a reference to a pointer, not a pointer to a reference): Node*& node ...


3

The circularity of angles is not a major obstacle: to instead an interval like [270, 45) that wraps around, instead insert two intervals [270, 360), [0, 45). To implement insertion without wraparound, we can use a binary search tree. This tree tracks the uncovered intervals by mapping each endpoint of an uncovered interval to whether it's a left or right ...



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