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6

Basically, because a Node is not a AVLNode - you created it a Node, so it's a Node. If you'd created it as a AVLNode you could cast it to a Node, but not the other way round.


6

In your code you write: this.root = this.root.leftChild; add(newNode.data); This is probably wrong behavior? You should rewrite it to: add(this.root.leftChild,newNode); And then define a recursive method that looks whether the item should be stored left/right of the subroot. Something like: public void add(Node subroot, int data){ if(data > ...


6

Node isn't a type; it's a: value of type BinaryTree when fully applied a data constructor for such a value (a -> BinaryTree a -> BinaryTree a -> BinaryTree a) Both really mean the same, but it can be helpful to realize the appearance in two different contexts, namely pattern matching and construction. Your member function most probably should ...


6

The return statement terminates the function. It's useful to stop the execution of a void function that does not actually return any value. In this case, once you've found the right place for the new node and added it, there's no point to continue executing the function, so return is used.


5

The standard doesn't say how the containers are to be implemented, so you can't count on an RB or a AVL tree. In practice... the complexity constraints are such that I don't know of any other implementations which would fit the bill. But it's in the complexity constraints that you will find the answer: “logarithmic in general, but amortized constant ...


5

print_bst(tree->root); yeah, that's not going to work, main.c does not #include anything that can tell it that tree has a root element. The simplest way to fix this is move the definition of Tree into BST.h where main.c can access it.


5

The parameter head in insertNode shadows the member variable named head. However, while that's a really bad practice, the other answer is the true reason for your error, so please select his answer instead (once you get it working, of course). I'd recommend changing the signature of insertNode to void insertNode(int data, Node*& node) Also, you ...


5

Your insert method never assigns value to the root, so it remains null. If I understand your code, your insert should look like this : void insert(NODE nodeptr,int key){ if(root == null){ root = new NODE(key); return; } if(nodeptr == null){ insert (root, key); return; } if(key <= nodeptr.data){ ...


5

int[] bstArray; <-------- This line does not create the Array You actually need to initialize the array int[] bstArray=new bstArray[someLength]; <------- like this then use bstArray[x] = node.getValue();


5

inorder(t.left) only creates the generator object, it doesn't actually run it. You need to iterate and yield the values produced by each of the subgenerators: # Python 2 def inorder(t): if t: for key in inorder(t.left): yield key yield t.key for key in inorder(t.right): yield key This becomes a lot ...


4

Walk the tree in any order, keeping the following values: N: the number of nodes seen selected: the currently selected node. Initially, N is 0 and selected is None. Visiting a node consists of the following: Increment N Generate a random integer in the range [0, N). If the random integer selected is 0, set selected to the current Node. Note that the ...


4

The reason you're getting 12 is that your code returns twice the number of elements in the tree (of which there are 6). The fact that 12 also happens to be the first element is purely a coincidence. The return statement should read: return 1 + size(node.left) + size(node.right); i.e. this node plus the size of the left subtree plus the size of the right ...


4

There are three main possibilities when you try to remove data from your Binary Search Tree: data is less than the current node value: Call remove on the left subtree or throw a NoSuchElementException if it is null. data is greater than the current node value: Call remove on the right subtree or throw a NoSuchElementException if it is null. data is equal ...


4

foldr has type (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b, which means it expects a function of type a -> b -> b as its first argument. In your particular example, that translates to Integer -> BST Integer -> BST Integer, which is different than insert's type. The easiest solution would be to flip the insert function: let mBST = foldr (flip ...


4

With an unbalanced tree: 1 \ 2 \ 3 \ 4 \ 5 \ ... Your intuition of cutting the tree in half with each operation no longer applies. This unbalanced tree is the worst case of an unbalanced binary search tree. To search for 10 at the bottom of the list, you must make 10 operations, one for each element ...


4

Don't overthink it. It's simply because of the remove operation which always goes to the far left element and removes it. After several of these operations, you would end up with the tree being "heavier" to the right of the tree, regardless of root node or anything else. Even if you have an extremely high valued root node that tends to push newly added ...


4

return will return from the current function, but of course where you return to, in a recursive situation, is the level below, so you may need to check the result and decide what to do, and not continue searching the other side of a tree, for example.


4

You can also do it the good old recursive way: def treeSize(self, root): if root is None: return 0 if root is not None: return 1 + self.treeSize(root.left) + self.treeSize(root.right) Jonathan's answer is nice as well.


4

I cannot just add the values of the node to check if the trees are equal. Sure you can. hashCodes do not have to be unique, and if two BSTs have the same contents, then summing the node contents will give you the same results in each case, which satisfies the hashCode contract. Remember -- return 0 is always a valid implementation of hashCode(); ...


4

You have not followed the specifications correctly. For one thing, your rebalance operation increases the size of the tree. For another, the result is not always a binary search tree. You must understand how these trees work before you attempt to implement them. There is just no way around that. I advise you to study your text (or wikipedia) and try ...


4

I'd call your understanding not quite correct. The big-O notation does not say anything about an exact amount of steps done. A notation O(log n) means that something is approximately proportional to log n, but not neccesarily equal. If you say that the number of steps to search for a value in a BST is O(log n), this means that it is approximately C*log n ...


4

When you say nodeToBeDeleted = null; inside the delete method, you are not really causing the Node returned by the getNode method to start pointing to a null. Java is always pass-by-value. This means that you can't make a reference passed to a method point to a new memory location inside the method. Similarly, you can't make a reference returned by a ...


4

When you set nodeToBeDeleted to null, you only set the value of the local variable that holds the reference to the actual object. The actual object is not deleted in any way. With the code you've shown here, to delete the node, you should find its parent and set the reference to this node (leftChild or rightChild) to null. This will ensure that the object ...


4

You have to delete the node from the tree and not locally in your program. Node<Integer> nodeToBeDeleted = getNode(deletionNodeValue); gives you a copy of the Node in the tree. nodeToBeDeleted = null; sets this copy to null. The connection to the tree is not deleted because it is part of the node object. To delete the connection you would have to ...


4

I guess this should do the trick: traverse(BinaryTree *root) { if (!root) return; cout << p->data << " "; if (root->left ) traverseL(root->left ); //special function for outer left if (root->right) traverseR(root->right); //special function for outer right } traverseL(BinaryTree *p) { cout << p->data << ...


4

To reserve the memory. After struct node {...}, you basically now have a blueprint on how nodes are supposed to look like. Then you go to the urban memory planning office, and tell them "I'm making a new node, can I reserve 24 square meters bytes somewhere?" And they tell you "Sure, this here should be a good place, we promise not to give it to anyone else. ...


4

Yes, but they are esoteric. Modern computers are digital, use base two, are electronic, and use classical systems largely due to the success of integrated digital logic circuits, but it was a long road and other types of computers have been invented along the way. Digital computers in other bases A handful of computers were made based on ternary (base 3) ...


4

You're not advancing root correctly down the tree. This: if(data < (*root)->data){ *root = (*root)->left; }else{ *root = (*root)->right; } should be this: if(data < (*root)->data){ root = &(*root)->left; }else{ root = &(*root)->right; } The purpose of the pointer-to-pointer root is to hold the address ...


3

I think your problem is the line tDelete _ n@(Node ETree ETree _) = n -- Or give "Not found" error? It breaks if the value you are looking for actually is in that node. Also, it is redundant with the next pattern, so I think you can just remove it.



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