New answers tagged

0

The problem is in the insert_tree function. Because your function gets only a pointer of a tree and not a pointer to a pointer you returned the value. So, in the main you should place the tree equal to the function. Your function gets the tree pointer by value and not by reference. like this: int main(void) { tree = insert_tree(tree, 34); tree = ...


3

Remove the least element from T2 and make it the root of a tree with T1 as the left subtree and the rest of T2 as the right. max(h1, h2) is just a convenient bound on the length of T2's left spine. We can actually get an algorithm that runs in time O(min(h1, h2)) by traversing T1's right spine and T2's left spine in a dovetailed fashion and then executing ...


0

I think you have to explicitly find the heights of the trees. Without more specific info, there just isn't anything else you can do. You can find the height of a tree recursively in O(n) time where n is the number of nodes in the tree.


1

The up-arrow is not a standard. In fact pseudo-code is not really a standard either so each author has some liberty in what notations they use. The author should have made a legend for the pseudo-code explaining what the up-arrow means. My interpretation is that it is intended to show that Tree is a pointer to a data structure of type node. The notation is ...


0

2 hints: You should make the counter increment independent of the fact that the next node will be the next one. That is not the case in general. 2 different checks could be done whether to increment the counter and to calculate the next node. You should distinguish the way a node is reached, because probably you have to act different accordingly.


0

It seems the code incorrectly compares the current midpoint with the min and max index. Instead if (min <= midpoint - 1) : else if (midpoint + 1 <= max) it should use if (min < midpoint - 1) : else if (midpoint + 1 < max) Try the below attempt to correct it: public static boolean binarySearch(int[] data, int min, int max, int target){ ...


0

You divide your data into a half smaller than midpoint, with a range (min, mid-1) and bigger than midpoint, with a range (mid+1, max). if you have an input of {2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31}, and min = 0; max= 10, then int midpoint = (0 + 10) / 2; // which is 5 Iff data[midpoint] is not what you were looking for, need need to look for everything ...


0

The array data is already sorted from smallest to largest Therefore it finds if the value at the midpoint is greater than the target, then the target would appear in the values before midpoint. So we recursively call the method only on the left of the midpoint i.e. all the values from the min till the value before the midpoint. Similarly if the midpoint is ...


0

I replaced private Key latestKey with private Node latest and made the following changes. public void put(Key key, Value val){ if ((latest != null) && (latest.key.compareTo(key) == 0)){ latest.val = val; return; } root = put(root, key, val); root.colour = BLACK; } public Node put(Node x, Key key, Value val){ if ...


0

Binary search searches the left half (min... mid-1) and the right half (mid+1...max) recursively. You are checking mid against target, so that is why it isn't included in that range. You really should have a base-case for if (min >= max) return false; to prevent going out of bounds of the array. Here is a cleaner implementation as I find it easier ...


0

I would suggest that your nodes contain a link to the parent (the root having itself as a parent). Then its easy: def rotateLeft(self): new_root = self.right new_left_sub = new_root.left old_root = self self.parent.right = new_root #assuming self is a right child old_root.right = new_left_sub new_root.left = old_root My code may ...


2

Hope this solution will satisfy you. - (NSArray *)searchString:(NSString *)search{ NSIndexSet *indexes = [dataArray indexesOfObjectsPassingTest: ^BOOL (id obj, NSUInteger i, BOOL *stop) { NSString *myObj = obj; return [myObj containsString:search]; ...


0

There is essential information missing. If you look for "axx", do you expect "haxx" to be in your results? "HaXX"? "Axxyyyz"? "äxx"? How many strings do you have? 10? 100? 1000? 100,000? How often do you do this search? How often does the array change? First step is to figure out which NSString method will match the strings you want to match. Second step ...


0

This is a fairly simple problem. As Avi suggests in his comment, there's 2 parts to it: The method you use for matching, and the method you use for searching for those matches. If your array is sorted and you're looking for a single, perfect match, you can use a binary search. I believe that will give you O(log(n)) performance. (Time goes up with the log ...


0

I have been able to find a solution without the slashes. Traverse the tree breadth-first; store all the values found on a level in an ArrayList; print the values on a line with indentation and spacing depending on the level; go to the next level and store all the values of the level, and so on. The commented block is for the slashes. Given the input 10, 5, ...


0

Step 1 : write a function which returns the in-order successor Step 2 : Starting with the leftmost node, find the in-order successor until there is none public class TreeNode { int data; TreeNode left; TreeNode right; TreeNode parent; } public class TreeUtility { public void inorderNoRecursion(TreeNode root) { ...


1

One thing's for sure: this is not an easy problem. Here's my approach. First things first, let's get the recursion straight. What I'd like to be able to do is print the left subtree of the node, then print the right subtree, then somehow combine those two to get my final result. To do this, I'm going to need a data class for those intermediate values: ...


0

What you can do is to take a queue and initialize it with nodes at each level as you go down traversing at each level. After that pop each element , print it and push to queue its left and right node. Like this go on traversing till entire depth and you shall be able to print the tree in your desired format.


1

My tested solution public int minDepth(TreeNode root) { if(root == null){ return 0; } int ldepth = minDepth(root.left); int rdepth = minDepth(root.right); if(ldepth == 0){ return 1+rdepth; }else if(rdepth == 0){ return 1+ldepth; } return (1 + Math.min(rdepth, ldepth)); } Here, we calculate ldepth ...


0

Number of comparisons will be 36 . You can conclude that maximum number of comparisons to insert an element in BST will not be more than height of the tree.


0

I figured out the culprit. The issue was with Traversal function which I wrote separately. The Node function here takes int value, however, in Traversal function, I was printing its String value (my Node class has both String and Integer as keys). Such a silly mistake! The code appears correct.


1

Similar to ghostofrasputin, the return statement is there because if the while condition is not met, then there is still a value to return. Now the more important question, why do we need the last return if the program will never reach that return statement? (which I believe is this case for this) Even though you are able to tell that the return statement ...


0

It's for the case where the root isn't null, but it's the only node in the tree (the root is at depth 0). That return statement is needed because if the tree is empty, then something must be returned. It returns 0, because the depth is 0.


0

I believe, your code does not express your intent. I am not familiar with Java, but you would want to pass a reference to the node in the function linkListToBSTrec, otherwise the changed value of head from the left recursive call will not be reflected in the parent function.


-1

The correct way to construct a balanced BST from a sorted list is to use the head of the tree as the middle element of the sorted list. Then the left subtree can be constructed recursively for the elements to the left of the middle element and similarly the right subtree contains elements to the right of the middle element. You are using the leftmost ...


0

I think you are changing head pointer at a wrong point. It should be before TreeNode left = linkListToBSTrec(head, n / 2); For the first time, your head and left both are 1. That's why you are getting the same data multiple times. I haven't actually run the program. By looking at it I think head pointer should be changed earlier.


3

You are only traversing subnodes of nodes with vowel-starting data. Move the test deeper into the block, just around the print function.


-1

There are several additional areas where you want to avoid causing problems for yourself in the long run. You want to avoid hardcoding filenames in the main body of your code, much less hardcoding filenames buried in functions. If you need to operate on a file, such as you do it create or search, pass a FILE* parameter (or filename) to the function. This ...


2

There is no issue with your inOrder function and insert_node function. The usage has some issues. In the line root->Word = inputString; you are assigning the local store address to root. As local store continues to change, the root Word also changes.


3

Here you read the value of the root node: root = newNode(); fscanf(infile,"%s",inputStringPtr); root->Word = inputString; and here, you overwrite it again with the value of the second node: while (fscanf(infile,"%s",inputStringPtr) == 1) { You could use strdup() to make a copy of the root value: root->Word = strdup(inputString); This should ...


0

Here is the corrected code: #include<stdio.h> #include<stdlib.h> struct node { int info; struct node *left, *right; }; struct node* insert(struct node* root, int item) { struct node *temp,*temp1,*pre; temp = (struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node)); temp->info = item; temp->left = temp->right = NULL; if (root == NULL) { ...


0

It doesn't support case when there isn't any leave. Handle this too at the beginning of match: if(root->rigt == NULL && root->left==NULL) { free(root); return NULL; }


0

First of all you always create a new node in your recursive function insert_node. Create a new node only if it will be inserted. Aprat from this you have to allocate dynamic memory for yor member Word and copy nextString it to it. Adapt your code like this: void insert_node(Node* root, char *nextString) { printf("Root->Word = %s\n",root->Word); ...


1

Eventually, I found the solution myself. The technique to use for reconstructing a BST from an array that was created from the BST depth-first is based on pre-order traversal. I found the solution here and implemented it in my own BST class here. The essential part goes as follows: bool BinarySearchTree::fromArrayPreorderTraversal(std::vector<unsigned ...


0

there are some reworks to your functions, #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> // TREE_H typedef struct Tree Tree; struct Tree{ char key[16]; int value; Tree* left; Tree* right; }; void insert( Tree** proot , char* key, int value); int find(Tree* root, char* key,int *result); void destroyTree(Tree** ...


1

You presented a lot of code. I will only point out the first major error, which is that C is pass by value. When a pointer is passed to the function insert, a copy of that pointer is made. That copy is the argument Tree* root of the same function. If it is changed, it will not affect the original pointer outside the function. Therefore, this code does ...


-1

Might I recommend you avoid using strcpy to copy data from key to key, but instead use memcpy and/or memset (since it's always 16 characters). I also recommend you zero out anything you malloc so you know the state of the memory you received. The key is always 16 bytes, ergo, when initializing the tree, memset(key, 0, 16) would zero out the key (and look ...


1

May be you don't know that each time you run your program, it initialize all the data in RAM from scratch? In another case, may be your mistake is that you suppose that root.data will be printed after first insertion. You should do at least 2 insertions, to make your code print something, because on first insertion the root is always null. You could easily ...


0

I guess what you are looking for is: node ##class '__main__.node' del(node) node Traceback (most recent call last): NameError: name 'node' is not defined


1

here a few fix to your code class Node: def __init__(self, data, left=None, right=None): self.data = data self.left = left self.right = right def add_node(self, data): if self.data > data: if self.left is None: self.left = Node(data) else: ...


0

I discovered the answer I needed after some diagramming and trial and error. private String printPreOrder(Node current) { if (current != null) { output += current.value; if (current.left != null) output += " "; printPreOrder(current.left); if (current.right != null) output += " "; printPreOrder(current.right); } return output; } Some ...


2

When you write treeInsert :: Ord a => a -> FamilyTree a -> FamilyTree a the type system ensures that the type of the first argument equals the index of the second. It means that you can insert a Male only in a tree that starts from a Male. I guess, this is not what you want. However it's a nice question and I'll answer it. The problem in ...


1

If you are not scared of having mutable objects around (which you seem to have given your proposed solution), you can do it with 1-2 operations. Instead of 1. contains() 2a. exists? get(), modify, put() 2b. doesn't exist? create, put() you can just do 1. get() 2a. null? create put() 2b. not-null? modify object contents, as you already have reference ...


1

You can achieve 1 and 2 in one hit if you switch to ConcurrentMap.computeIfAbsent(...). It returns the new/old object so you can update it. If Java-7 then putIfAbsent but that requires an extra new - perhaps a bad thing if construction is expensive.


1

I think you are doing pretty good. O(k.log(n)) = O(log(n)) where k is a constant. So your time complexity is actually O(log(n))


0

Edit: This is incorrect as pointed out by the comment below. (I would have put this as a comment to the accepted answer, but I do not have enough points to comment) I think that the question is a bit ambiguous / incomplete in that it is not stated whether the BST is balanced. If it is necessarily balanced, then marcog's answer is no doubt correct. However, ...


0

If you can't use substring or similars, do a "look for maximum node" search (cheap log(n) operation), save that node and add an if statement on your output additions that checks if the node whose info has to be added isn't the last one. In that case, add the value without the space. Node last = max(root); private Node max(Node x){ if (x.right == null) ...


0

If your only concern is removing the extra space at the end you could replace: return "[" + output.substring(0, output.length() - 1) + "]"; with: return "[" + output.Trim() + "]"; Another approach I might take is filling a List with the ordered values, and then you can have a greater control of how you format the ordered values as a string.


0

Use O(1) space, which means we will not use O(h) stack. To begin: hasNext()? current.val <= endNode.val to check if the tree is fully traversed. Find min via left-most: We can alwasy look for left-most to find next minimum value. Once left-most min is checked (name it current). Next min will be 2 cases: If current.right != null, we can keep looking for ...


2

The problem with your approach is that Data can be any type. Your design allows you to put multiple types into the same tree. So one node might have a string and the other might have a double, and a third could have a reference to a user-defined type. If you make the Node constructor take an IComparable instance, you're assuming that all of the items in the ...



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