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6

Let's think about this from an information-theoretic perspective. If you have an array with n elements in it, there are n+1 possible spots where the new element can go: just before any element of the array, or after all the elements. Therefore, your algorithm needs to make enough comparisons to be able to uniquely identify which of the n+1 spots is the right ...


4

you can avoid for loop and check condition by just giving number like this: txtLinearOutput.setText(listOfBooks[number-1]); remove your code // Linear search to match index number and user input number for(int i = 0; i < listOfBooks.length - 1; i++) { if (listOfBooks.get(i) == number) { txtLinearOutput.setText(listOfBooks[i]); break; } ...


3

No. Unfortunately the code is not correct as it stands. I made a simple test and the program did not return (infinite loop). Some of the problems I noticed: unsigned int mid = leftIndex + (leftIndex + rightIndex) / 2; You want the middle in between. So why are you adding leftIndex? Then if(a[rightIndex] < a[mid]) leftIndex = ++mid; Why ++mid? ...


3

std::set is typically implemented as a self-balancing tree with some list like structure tied into it. Knowing this structure, std::set::lower_bound will traverse the tree knowing the properties of the tree structure. Each step in this just means following a left or right child branch. std::lower_bound needs to run something akin to a binary search over the ...


3

First of all, the list has to be sorted on the col1 property for you to be able to use binary search at all. You would need a comparer that compares the col1 property: public class LimitsComparer : IComparer<Limits> { public int Compare(Limits x, Limits y) { return x.col1.CompareTo(y.col1); } } Then you can use that to do the binary ...


3

The binary search is going so fast that when you try to print the time it took, it just prints 0.0. Whereas using in takes long enough that you see the very small fraction of a second it took. The reason that in does take longer is because this is a list, not a set or similar data structure; whereas with a set, membership testing is somewhere between O(1) ...


2

Why do you expect O(1) when testing if an element is contained in a list? If you don't know anything about the list (like that it is sorted as in your example) then you have to go through each element and compare it. So you get O(N). Python lists cannot assume anything about what you store in them, so they have to use a naive implementation for ...


2

binary search requires the array to be sorted, which is not your case. Live Demo with sorted input, and with fixed calling site (last is not TOTAL but TOTAL - 1)


2

You are comparing if (listOfBooks.get(i) == number) it is wrong, you should compare: if (i == number), becouse you need compare element position.


1

Short version by hacking Collections.binarySearch The framework has built-in binary search and generic List<T> interface, you should use them. The built-in binarySearch function always supplies the pivot element to the comparator as the second argument. This is undocumented behaviour, but we can exploit that, using the following comparator: ...


1

you only have to uncomment the Program.assertEqual like this : Program.assertEqual(doSearch(primes, 73), 20); not like this : //Program.assertEqual(doSearch(primes, 73), 20);


1

I solved it in a simple way in O(m + n) time complexity, where m = no. of rows and n = no. of columns. The algorithm is simple: I started from top right corner (we can also start from bottom left corner) and move left if current element is greater than the value to be searched and bottom if current element is smaller than the value to be searched. ...


1

The trick is that you look at the index where your binary search ends instead of the value at that position. I did not know of this algorithm yet. Thanks for your description. I implemented it in python for you :) import random import bisect # 10 red, 20 blue, 70 green counts = [10, 20, 70] sums = [10, 30, 100] # count how often some color occurs to ...


1

You could use somthing like this. myList.Where(i => i.col1 == "abc").ToList();


1

After reading the API of std:lower_bound: std:lower_bound On non-random-access iterators, the iterator advances produce themselves an additional linear complexity in N on average. And I think STL set is using non-random-access iterators, so it is not doing a O(lg N) binary search if using on STL set


1

std::lower_bound always guarantees a O(log n) comparisons, only guarantees O(log n) time if passed a RandomAccessIterator, not just a ForwardIterator which does not provide constant-time std::advance. The std::set::lower_bound implementation of the same algorithm is able to use internal details of the structure to avoid this problem.


1

std::lower_bound is a generic binary search algorithm, meant to work with most STL containers. set::lower_bound is designed to work with std::set so it takes advantages of the unique properties of std::set. As std::set is often implemented as a red-black tree, one can imagine std::lower_bound iterating across all nodes, while set::lower_bound just traverses ...


1

int first= 0; int last= a.length - 1; while (first<= last) { int middle = first+ (last- first) / 2; if (user.compareTo(list.get(middle)) < 0) last = middle - 1; else if (user.compareTo(list.get(middle)) > 0) first= middle + 1; else { found =1 ; break; } } and don't forget ...


1

Binary Search works on Sorted Arrays only, to make your code work, you need to sort KeyWords first.


1

In order to perform the binary search correctly the search vector (KeyWords in your case) must be correctly sorted. And this is not the case in your example, since you have 'break' after 'struct', for example.



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