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4

You are correct. Unless the array is sorted, you still have to examine every element in each half (and each quarter and each eighth as you recur). The only way it can be O(log N) is if you can discard half the search space each recursion level (such as searching for a specific value in a sorted list) and the only way that can happen is if it's sorted. But ...


2

You can use binary search on the value by counting how many entries in the multiplication table will be less than the value. This will require log(NM) iterations in the binary search so we need to be able to compute the count in O(N) for a total complexity of O(Nlog(NM)). This can be done by considering each multiplication table in turn. For example, ...


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The return value of recursiveBinarySearch is ignored in the recursion try writing: return recursiveBinarySearch(a,p,m-1,x);


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There is a missing return at the end of your binarySearch function. In Java, the compiler verifies that on every possible execution path a return of the right type exists. In your case, if all tests are false, then the execution rises the end of the function where there is no returned value, violating the function contract. Your algorithm differs from the ...


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This part will be your abort condition: if(low>high) return false; at the end - if no element has been found - the recursion will be called with low beeing greater than high - and that aborts immediately. look at the two calls: if(A[mid]<key) return Bsearch( A, mid+1, A.length, key); if(A[mid]>key) return Bsearch(A, 0, mid-1, ...


1

You are right, this will never terminate if the key doesn't exist in the array. There should be a base case that checks for when this happens? Since this is related to a school problem i'll just give some point questions. When could this happen? If you have searched all the way to the last possible location that key can exist in, when will happen then? ...


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When you call recursiveBinarySearch( ) recursively, you call it with a return statement, because if the recursive function returns something, the function that calls the recursive function should return the same value. The code should be: int recursiveBinarySearch(int* a, int p, int r, int x) { if(p>r) return -1; else { int m = (p+r)/2; ...


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I believe it always tries to find the middle by (0+n)/2 = (0+9)/2 = 4(Integer) In your case. So in case you want to search 25 itself, as per the algorithm you will find in the lower bound group, position 4 first as a match.


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The middle value is first 25 number. Your binarySearch first call is something like that : binarySearch(a,1,a.length) , where "a" is your array. Your array length is 10 , so m = ((10-1) +1)/2 = 5 position in array . Then you call binarySearch(1,m) and apply the same method to this array (the first half from orginal array ) –2, 8, 13, 22, 25


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Live demo There is multiple things that you need to fix in the code, check my comments: var doSearch = function(array, targetValue) { var min = 0; var max = array.length - 1; var guess; var values; while (min <= max) { // "less or equal" otherwise some case won't work guess = Math.floor((min + max) / 2); // guess ...


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You have an unnecessary loop inside the function: while(first<=last) This is an infinite loop, because first and last are never reassigned inside the loop. You already use recursion by calling binarysearch inside the loop body. Either change the while to if, or remove the recursive calls and assign to first and last instead of initial and final (and ...


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If you have no idea about the distribution of the boundaries, it is like you don't know anything about your problem. Further, as there is no penalty for obtaining "stone" or "gold", you can forget about the boundary in between these two and treat the whole setup as "platinum" -- "non platinum". Again, without an idea then where this single boundary is, you ...


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Solution 1 I don't know if this is the same as Rem's solution, but you could solve this quite easily with a binary search tree. Initialize an empty binary search tree and then iterate in reverse order through the array. Insert each element in the binary search tree and then perform a count of all the elements in the tree above the value of the element. ...


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High and low appear to be indices for which part of the list to search. In the first example, 15 has an index of 3, so specifying a lower index of 4 means the 15 isn't included in the search space. In the second example, 84 has an index of 5, so it is included in the search space spanning indices 0 and 6. These indices are also inclusive. If the second ...


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Binary search . bsearch(list , element to be found , start index , end index). start index can be taken as 0 at the start of the function and last index can be taken as len(list)-1 As in question for bsearch(L,15 , 4 , 8 ). U are searching only between 5th and 9th element where the number is not present. In the second function call u are searching between ...



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