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Make your Binary Tree generic like public class BinaryTree<T extends Comparable<T>>{ ... } Whenever creating a BinaryTree instance, specify the containied type: new BinaryTree<MyClass>(); Where MyClass must implement Comparable<MyClass>, i.e. be comparable to Objects of the same class. Your methods would read as (example): ...


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From an OOP perspective I believe approach number 2 is the way to go. (Statics are in general often frowned upon in OOP.) As I understand it, the method uses this as root, and then traverses the rest of the tree without calling any instance methods? This isn't too bad considering that the other nodes are of the same class, which means that the code is ...


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I think this depends on what you're trying to model and how you're trying to model it. A tree where the internal nodes store values and the leaves are just leaves is essentially a standard binary tree (tree each leaf as NULL and you basically have an imperative-style binary tree). If the values are stored in sorted order, you now have a binary search tree. ...


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You described a tree with data at the leaves as "a poorly designed alternative to a List." I agree that this could be used as an alternative to a list, but it's not necessarily poorly designed! Consider the data type data Tree t = Leaf t | Branch (Tree t) (Tree t) You can define cons and snoc (append to end of list) operations - cons :: t -> Tree t ...


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If I understand what you want to do is something like case Leaf(v) :: rs => sums(xs, acc+v)


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Lets say we have a perfect balanced binaray tree containing n = 2k integers, so the depth is log₂(n) = k. The best and worst case is, as you say, O(1) and O(log(n)). Short way Lets pick a random integer X (uniform distributed) from the binary tree. The last row the tree contains the same number of integers as the first k-1 rows together. With probability ...


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Some of those methods definitely should be non-static members since they relate directly to a specific instance. tree.getSize() or tree.getDepth() is much easier to read and understancd than BinaryTree.getDepth(tree). However one could argue that the methods getPreOrder(), getInOrder(), getPostOrder() can be static or even in their own class. You can ...


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No, .NET does not contain a Binary Search Tree. It does contain a Red-Black Tree which is a specialized kind of Binary Search Tree in which each node is painted red or black and there are certain rules using these colours which keep the tree balanced and allows the tree to guarantee O(logn) search times. A standard Binary Search Tree cannot guarantee these ...



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