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6

bool TreeSet::insert(TREE *node should be bool TreeSet::insert(TREE *&node Pointers can also be passed by reference, and should be if you intend to modify them directly. Otherwise you pass by copy and you now have two pointers pointing at the same location. When you use the copied one to new up some data, it now points to a new memory location, ...


3

I tried to get a solution that used only Coq notations, but couldn't get it to work. I suspect that Coq's extensible parser is not powerful enough to understand the notation you want. There is, however, a poor man's solution that involves dependent types. The idea is to write a parser for that notation and use that parser's type to encode the parser state. ...


3

1) They are talking about walking the tree. You either use a recusrive algorithm (which uses the CPU stack to keep track of things for you), or you use an iterative approach and keep a data structure stack and manage the nodes you need to visit yourself. The latter may perform better because you eliminate the overhead of the function calls, but it is ...


3

You have two options: constructor overloading, or default values for the optional parameters. I am going to assume that the left and right constructor arguments should actually be pointers to nodes since you are building a tree. (I would suggest using std::unique_ptr here but I'm going to just use raw pointers in this answer since it's not important to the ...


3

In C++, you can provide a default for any function-argument you want, as long as it is not followed by arguments without defaults: Needs 3 arguments: int f(int a, int b, int c); Needs 2 arguments, the third is defaulted if not supplied: int g(int a, int b, int c = f(1,2,3)); Illegal: Cannot provide a default for argument 2, as an argument without ...


2

From the code in main() that builds the tree, your tree looks like: 9 / \ 13 10 /\ \ 8 4 20 /\ 3 18 This is clearly not a properly structured binary search tree, it doesn't uphold the invariant that nodes to the left of a node should be less than their parent and so on. Thus, your search code, which assumes a binary ...


2

Your binary search is.... broken. @Override public Node find(LocalDate valueToFind) { if (isEmpty()) { return null; } if (root.getDate().isAfter(valueToFind)) { find(root.getLeftChild().getDate()); } else if (root.getDate().isBefore(valueToFind)) { find(root.getRightChild().getDate()); } else if (root.getDate() ...


2

To verify your assumptions, you can inspect the code at runtime with a debugger or by using some printf. For example, with: char *ptr=(char *)&t; printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X\n",ptr[0],ptr[1],ptr[2],ptr[3]); Indeed the assumptions you identified are very often true, but you can't rely on them. I definitely would say that ...


2

You can prove 1 and 2 by yourself (i use x64, that's why all is 8bytes aligned in structures) objdump ./main -s -j .data Contents of section .data: 601030 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 ................ 601040 63000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 c............... 601050 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 ................ 601060 65000000 ...


2

Presuming a structure of nested vectors in which the first element is the value, the second is the left child and the third is the right child, this would work: (let [btree [45 [10] [57]] root-loc (zip/zipper vector? rest (fn [[x _ _] children] (vec (cons x children))) ...


2

When you pass a pointer as a parameter in the function insert like this: bool TreeSet::insert(TREE* node, const string& str); then the pointer is copied into the argument node. Pointing node to something else only points the local copy of the pointer. The pointer passed to the function from the call site is unchanged. node = new TREE; // Points ...


2

It seems to me that you want to know the size of the tree and not it's height. So instead of choosing the smallest height of the two subtrees below your root (the minDepth function) you want to sum their sizes. The following function adds one to the size of each of left and right subtrees if the node is not null (wouldn't really be a node at all and should ...


2

Modifications to your approach: the problem is you are not checking a node is leef or not. ALGORITHM CountLeaves(T ) //Input: A binary tree T //Output: The number of leaves in T if T = ∅ return 0 else if(left == null and right == null) return 1 // checks for leef node. else return CountLeaves(Left Leef)+ CountLeaves(Right Leef)


2

I think you misunderstood the task: the printing needs to be done when you walk a fully constructed binary tree. Since you are trying to print while your tree is under construction, some data is not available to you at the time when you need it. In particular, you cannot print "banana" or "curtain" on the first line, because all you have at that point is ...


1

This is not calling, this is member declaration and those are fields, if it was just int node we dont have any reference to node's childs so we need to have fields of type node and because of it is binary tree we need to have left child and right childs.


1

This should do: def countNodes(tree): if tree is None: return 0 left = tree.get_left_subtree() rght = tree.get_right_subtree() return (0 if left is None or rght is None else 1) \ + countNodes(left) + countNodes(rght)


1

You don't need to convert the Tree to your stateful value, you need to use the stateful value of Int at each stage of the labeling process. For that, you'll probably benefit from something like getLabelAndIncr :: MonadState m Int => m Int getLabelAndIncr = do current <- get put $ current + 1 return current Then in your label function ...


1

It's really quite simple to count two-child nodes recursively. If you return a number with each function call (zero as the base case) you can simply add 1 every time you find a two-child node: def findDoubleNodes(tree): if tree == None or (tree.left == None and tree.right == None): # base case return 0 elif tree.left <> None ...


1

If this node has a right sub-tree, the successor will be the first node in the right sub-tree. So go to the right sub-tree, from there, keep going left until you can go left no more. That node is the successor. If the node has no right sub-tree, we check its parent. If it has no parent and no right sub-tree, it's the last node in the tree. When we get to ...


1

int minDepth( TreeNode root ) { if( root == null ) return 0; if( root.left == null && root.right == null ) return 1; int l = minDepth(root.left); int r = minDepth(root.right); if( l == 0 ) return r; if( r == 0 ) return l; return 1 + Math.min(l,r); }


1

You're always going to return zero - you need a case like if(left == null and right == null) return 1 // this is a leaf if you want to be able to get a non-zero count


1

Firstly, in your class binTree, both the size() and height() methods have the following line: if (root = 0) Obviously this should be ==. The actual stack overflow problem though seems to be caused by your insert function. It takes the first parameter, node by reference. So when you call it with insert(root, t), node ends up as a reference to root. When a ...


1

Try below query SELECT * FROM NAMES INNER JOIN (SELECT pid FROM NAMES GROUP BY pid ORDER BY pid LIMIT 3) AS my_table USING (pid) DEMO


1

The LIMIT keyword in SQL limits the amount of rows that is returned. It there is a sort involved SQL will be smart enough to stop the ordering after the first three rows are found. If you want to do something else with the LIMIT keyword then you should explain what exactly it is you want to get.


1

Is start initialized to NULL somewhere? Also, when start is not NULL, you never link your newly created node into the tree: if(ptr == NULL) { ptr = new node; ptr->info = num; ptr->lchild = NULL; ptr->rchild = NULL; if(start == NULL) start = ptr; return; } You should check if a node's child is NULL and then link ...


1

Your ReheapDown method has a small issue. This should work: private void ReheapDown(int index) { bool Terminate; int Processing = index, Largest = -1; do { Terminate = true; int LeftChild = CLEFT(Processing), RightChild = CRIGHT(Processing); if ...


1

Your code is obviously different from the one in the article(and it has nothing to do with the language used). In your code, it is: int left = fromRoot(root.left, res) + root.val; int right = fromRoot(root.right, res) + root.val; ... return Math.max(left, right); But it should be: int left = fromRoot(root.left, res); int right = fromRoot(root.right, ...


1

function that you should pass to a tree_fold accepts three arguments, and you're passing a function that can take only two arguments. That's what compiler tries to say. Of course, ther're some other problems, but I hope tha you'll cope with them!


1

It is up to your implementation and specific requirements. Do you need duplicate elements? A binomial heap can support inserting the same value multiple times and will perform just as good(if you implement it correctly), but this does not mean that it should in your case.


1

Let's suppose you have n operations. Naturally, the maximum height is n + 1, on the first level you see the root operation, on the last level you see value leafs and on all other levels you see an operation node and a value leaf. The minimum depth (if your operations always "cut" the expression in the middle) is of ceil(log(2, 2 * n + 1)).



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