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8

Start with the preorder traversal. Either it is empty, in which case you are done, or it has a first element, r0, the root of the tree. Now search the inorder traversal for r0. The left subtree will all come before that point and the right subtree will all come after that point. Thus you can divide the inorder traversal at that point into an inorder ...


8

There is a mistake in the definition of your isElement function: you're calling leftTree twice, instead of calling both leftTree and rightTree. As a result, right subtrees are never explored. Amend the code accordingly, isElement tree t |isNode tree == False = False | nodeValue(tree) == t = True | otherwise = (isElement (leftTree(tree)) t) || ...


7

I think the problem is you're naming giving the inner nodes the same names so connectOutside connects the first names it finds (which happen to be the last nodes in your tree). You can solve this by giving each node a unique name depending on its position: diagTree :: Show s => Tree s -> Diagram Rasterific diagTree = go [] where go nm Empty = ...


7

The organization of Morse code is a binary tree.


7

This is my take at it: I've added PrintPretty to BNode, and I've removed the second Print function you had in BTree. (Edit: I made the tree more lisible by changing the original chars to draw the branches of the tree) static void Main(string[] args) { BTree btr = new BTree(); btr.Add(6); btr.Add(2); btr.Add(3); ...


6

Consider this snippet: if(xptr!=NULL) { printf(" %d is the successor of %d\n",a->x,xptr->x); } else printf("%d is the scuccessor of no one\n",xptr->x); whenever the xptr is null, control enters else part and then tries to print xptr->x which is ...


6

The *& is not a single symbol. But a combination of two: * for a pointer. & for reference. So you have the function: void deSerialize(Node *&root, FILE *fp) This function first parameter is a reference to a Node pointer. Meaning - when using it you send it a Node * object. And the function itself can change this pointer value - since you ...


6

A couple things: There's no reason why this function needs to return anything. The second version you show uses the return value to update the left and right pointers prior to freeing them, but (a) There's no need to since you're freeing the node anyway, and (b) The value is always NULL. Since it's a constant, there's no reason to return it. There's no ...


6

I've ended up with the following method that allows you to print arbitrary subtree: public static class BTreePrinter { class NodeInfo { public BNode Node; public string Text; public int StartPos; public int Size { get { return Text.Length; } } public int EndPos { get { return StartPos + Size; } set { ...


6

Yes you can. Label the internal nodes as a and the external ones as b; of course you can assume a as 0 and b as 1 (and vice-versa). But I think is easier to distinguish letters than numbers (although this matter of "taste"). If you don't know what are the "external nodes", then you can assume that they are the NULL pointers. Now, the preorder traversal of ...


5

The basic idea is as follows. For insertions, you first insert your new node at a leaf exactly as you would for a non-balanced tree. Then you work your way up the tree towards the root, making sure that, for each node, the difference in height between the left and right sub-trees is never more than one. If it is, you "rotate" nodes so that the difference ...


5

You're not constructing the Huffman tree correctly. The process is supposed to go like this: Turn all the source symbols into single-element huffman trees Pair each source symbol up with its frequency into a big list of tree/frequency pairs. If there is just one tree/frequency pair left, that tree is your Huffman tree. Else remove the two trees/frequency ...


5

You might have more luck asking on the Math Stack exchange. You are asking for the number of linear extensions of the binary tree considered as a poset. Although I can see no general formula, one can solve this recursively as follows: Find the number of ways of traversing the left and right subtrees (the empty tree is trivially traversed in 1 way). Call ...


5

A simpler solution would be to do an inorder traversal and keep track of the element currently to be printed with a counter k. When we reach k, print the element. The runtime is O(n). Remember the function return type can not be void, it has to return its updated value of k after each recursive call. A better solution to this would be an augmented BST with a ...


5

The code for maxDepth(node) reads like this: If node is not null: Run this same algorithm maxDepth on node's left child. Let this answer be x. Run this same algorithm maxDepth on node's right child. Let this answer be y. Calculate Math.max(x, y) + 1, and return this value as the answer for this function call. Otherwise node is null, then return 0. ...


5

null is used for marking the end of a level. The author is using level order traversal to find the depth of the tree. He uses Queue data structure to achieve it. To demarcate levels next to each other null is used as level marker. For eg. He first inserts root, then null marker. In while loop first iteration, first element from queue is removed and it's ...


5

First of all I believe your solution is not elegant because you are using undefined. You want to avoid partial functions, and structures, as much as possible and simply inserting some Node undefined undefined in a tree structure doesn't sound like a good idea. Think about this: once you have a Node undefined undefined how would it act with the other ...


5

Both the if and the else statements return a double They actually don't. The if branch always does, but the else branch doesn't. What happens if this.value equals "Invalid", or something else which isn't in your list? Then it won't ever hit a return statement. Since it's required to always return, or throw an exception, this isn't allowed. Even if you ...


5

I observe that the results of the recursive call to go on the left and right subtrees are not available to f; hence no matter what f does, it cannot choose to ignore the results of recursive calls. Therefore I believe that inorder as written will always walk over the entire tree. (edit: On review, this statement may be a bit strong; it seems f may have a ...


5

Here are the bugs: Line if (preorder[i]== postorder[lowIndex]) has two errors: the first is that you search in preorder instead of in postorder, and the second is that you use lowIndex instead of preIndex. This line should be: if (preorder[index.index]== postorder[i]) Line TreeNode root = new TreeNode (preorder[lowIndex]); - lowIndex is used again instead ...


5

You could have the DrawTree function return the position it printed its text. Then have the parent draw a line from its current position to the position returned by the child's DrawTree function. This would allow you to get rid of the lists. public Point DrawTree(Graphics g, int StartWidth, int EndWidth, int StartHeight, int Level, Node node) { String ...


4

Something like this will copy your Tree: def copyTree(t:Tree):Tree = { t match { case EmptyNode => EmptyNode case Node(left, right, value) => Node(copyTree(left), copyTree(right), value) } }


4

You can reference the actual node with @ notation: case n@Node(left, right, value) => n.value = "newValue"


4

Since we're not creating any objects on the heap, the space complexity is the size of the stack. So the question is not how many total calls occur, but how big the stack can grow. containsTree() can only call subTree(), subTree() can call itself or matchTree(), and matchTree() can only call itself. So at any point where matchTree() has been called, the ...


4

It can easily be done recursively . The function prints all the root to leaf paths along with the cheapest branch. I have used Arraylist to add all the nodes from root to leaf. Whenever a leaf node is reached i just check if the maxSum so far is smaller than then the current root to leaf path and update it. class Node { public int info; public Node ...


4

Suppose that we start off by walking down the left and right spines of the tree to determine their heights. We'll either find that they're the same, in which case the last row is full, or we'll find that they're different. If the heights come back the same (say the height is h), then we know that there are 2h - 1 nodes and we're done. Otherwise, the heights ...


4

This problem can be very easily solved by using: Solution 1 Stack: To print the root and the left subtree. Queue: To print the right subtree. Your function should be like this: void topview(Node root) { if(root==null) return; Stack<Integer> s=new Stack<Integer>(); s.push(root.data); Node root2=root; ...


4

A binary tree is a particular shape of tree. Specifically, a binary tree is a tree where each node can have either 0, 1, or 2 children. Binary trees make no restrictions about what values can be stored in the nodes or how those values relate to one another, so all of the following are valid binary trees: 1 4 9 / / \ ...


4

No. You cannot create an exact binary tree from preorder and postorder only as you would never be able to estimate the left/right child of the tree. You need the inorder traversal along with the any of the above. For example : consider PreOrder : AB PostOrder : BA Tree can be as follows : A or A / ...


4

printInOrder is working just fine. The left node's value isn't 3; the left node's value is another node, because setLeftNode: public void setLeftNode(BSTNode rootLeft){ BSTNode newLeftNode=new BSTNode(); newLeftNode.leftNode=null; this.leftNode=newLeftNode; newLeftNode.value=rootLeft; } isn't hooking the provided rootLeft node into ...



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