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1

It is helpful to think in terms of the tree structure and recursion, and recognise that pre-order, in-order and post-order traversals are three instances of a recursion on a tree. Since this is a homework, IMO the real question you should be asking "How can you simulate recursion with a stack?" Let me try to answer this with an illustration on a tree. Say ...


0

A recursive approach would be to use normal traversal (in,pre or post order) by modifying them a little, i.e. print a node only when it has no left child and right child. As for total cost, just declare a global or static variable and add value to it each time you hit a leaf node. I'll leave the non-recursive part for you to imagine.


0

Your disPlay method will not recurse to right branches ever, Because it returns values + left recursion only. I believe your intentios was something more like this: String BinaryTree::disPlay(TreeNode ^node) { String s; if (node) { s = node->values; s+=disPlay(node->left); s+=disPlay(node->right); } ...


0

Because String.Copy is static method, I believe. It returns back string which is not assigned to value field anywhere in you code Something like newNode->values = String::Copy(s); might work


1

Your insertRight method inserts on the left: def insertRight(self, newNode): if self.rightChild == None: self.leftChild = BinaryTree(newNode) # ^^^^ As such, all your rightChild attributes will forever remain None. You should use is to test for None: def insertRight(self, newNode): if self.rightChild is None: ...


0

I found the answer. Just needed convert string to int: static void Main(string[] args) { Tree t = new Tree(); int n = 6; int[] strs = new int[n]; for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { strs[i] = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine()); } for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { ...


1

I think, you're using same variable name for multiple DATA-TYPES; i.e. using int data and KAUstudent data;


0

Look at the source code of java.util.TreeMap.


0

The reference implementation implements top-down splaying. Even if you need it in Java, the C reference implementation is really good for working out the details:


0

There is the complete code (in Ruby). As an example, I have reproduced the same "n-node binary tree" as in the "Introduction to algorithms" book. class Node attr_accessor :key, :parent, :left, :right def initialize(key, parent) @key = key @parent = parent end end class Tree def initialize(root) @root = root end def ...


0

2. No. of structurally different binary trees = C(n) From Wikipedia, Catalan number satisfy the recurrence relation: C(0) = 1, C(1) = 1 C(n) = C(0)*C(n-1) + C(1)*C(n-2) + ... + C(n-1)*C(0) Denote h(n) = No. of structurally different binary trees with node n,then: h(0) = 1 h(1) = 1 ... With n node, left subtree of root may have 0,1,...,n-1 nodes ...


0

For #1, you can watch this: Count Number of Binary Search Tress given N Distinct Elements For #2, you can watch this: Number of Binary Trees with n nodes The basic idea is that we take a node as the root and distribute the rest on the left and right subtrees, which are a smaller subproblems of the original one. For #3, it's the number of different binary ...


2

No. of structurally different binary trees - in here the order does not matter, all vertices are the same - all that matters is the structure. So, we can make a bijection - given a BST, create a tree where all nodes are identical. Now, given two different BSTs - you are going to get two different trees that nodes are identical (otherwise there was a ...


1

You can recurse over the nodes of the tree keeping the sum from the root down to this point. When you reach a leaf node, you return the current sum in a list of one element. In the internal nodes, you concatenate the lists returned from children. Sample Code: class Node: def __init__(self, value, children): self.value = value ...


0

Here is what you are looking for. In this example, trees are stored as dicts with a "value" and a "children" keys, and "children" maps to a list. def triesum(t): if not t['children']: return [t['value']] return [t['value'] + n for c in t['children'] for n in triesum(c)] Example trie = {'value': 5, 'children': [ {'value': 7, ...


0

use this query for your work. Just replace $parent with your target parent . SELECT COUNT(*) as 'num' FROM `your_table` WHERE `parent`=$parent


2

No, this is O(n * log(n)) because you are traversing the length of the tree, which is O(log(n)), n times.


4

I don't think this is possible. Consider these two trees: 0 0 / \ / \ 1 2 1 2 / \ / \ / \ 3 4 3 4 5 6 / \ 5 6 These are complete binary trees (according to your definition), and even though they're different trees they have the same level-order traversals: 0123456. Now, look ...


0

According to general definitions, in a complete binary tree, every level except possibly the last, is completely filled, and all nodes are as far left as possible. So a complete binary tree may have a node with just one child (for eg, one root node with one left child is a complete binary tree). A tree where all nodes except the leaves have 2 child nodes is ...


0

I am posting this as answer because I dont have the necessary reputation to post a comment. Except for bagelboy all others have misunderstood the tree as either Binary Search Tree or Complete Binary Tree. The question is simple Binary Tree and Bagelboy's answer looks correct.


0

We can apply two approaches , one is Recursive and other one is iterative(queue based implementation ) .Here i am going to explain both methods. Recursive Solution int count_leaf(Node node) { if(node==NULL) return 0; if(node->left==NULL && node->right==NULL) return 1; return count_leaf(node->left)+count_leaf(node->right); } ...


1

Try this: If root has no children, then root is leaf node. If root has left child, then the left child must have a leaf node. Same as right child. node* leaf(node* root) { if(root == NULL) return NULL; if(root->left == NULL && root->right == NULL) { return root; } else if(root->left != NULL) { return ...


1

In the attached code, printGivenLevel() is O(n) indeed for worst case. The *complexity function) of printGivenLevel() is: T(n) = T(left) + T(right) + O(1) where left = size of left subtree right = size of right subtree In worst case, for each node in the tree there is at most one son, so it looks something like this: 1 ...


0

class Node: def __init__(self,data): self.left = None self.right = None self.data = data class BinaryTree: def __init__(self): self.root = None def insert_node(self,root,element): if self.root is None: self.root = Node(element) else: if root is None: root = Node(element) ...


0

As already mentioned in the comments, one of your loops does not return. The problematic snippet is while(myFile.length() > position) { while(!Character.isWhitespace(next)) { if (Character.isLetterOrDigit(next)) { nextWord += myFile.charAt(position); } position++; next = myFile.charAt(position); } theTree.add(nextWord); ...


0

I have no idea what that function is doing, and why you need that rather than string.toLowerCase().split("\\s"), or just new Scanner(string.toLowerCase()), but when this condition is true: while(myFile.length() > position), and next is a whitespace, position is not increased inside the loop, and next is not reassigned, so, you'll just keep spinning. ...


5

You repeatedly call this.breakIntoWords(str, position) with the same str and position, using its return value to decide when to stop. Since nothing changes from the one iteration to the next, the loop never terminates.


1

When you are creating a tree, value are also assigned with each node. See following code: typedef struct BST { int data; struct BST *lchild, *rchild; } node; void insert(node *root, node *new_node) { if (new_node->data < root->data) { if (root->lchild == NULL) root->lchild = new_node; else ...


0

Initial note: This answer assumes that the InsertNode function is initially called with root being the root of the tree, and node being the node to insert into the tree. One problem is this statement: root = CreateNode(node->value); Since the argument root is passed by value, which means that it is copied, the assignment will only change the local ...


1

You are editing the root in this line: this.root = this.root.rightChild; I think you should add the new node to the right recursively like this: else { addRight(this.root.rightChild, newNode); } And just as a note i think you have problem in this block "in the add method": if(this.root ==null){ newNode =this.root; // it ...


6

In your code you write: this.root = this.root.leftChild; add(newNode.data); This is probably wrong behavior? You should rewrite it to: add(this.root.leftChild,newNode); And then define a recursive method that looks whether the item should be stored left/right of the subroot. Something like: public void add(Node subroot, int data){ if(data > ...


0

Here is my double-linked-list based solution in Objective-C: #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> #import <stdio.h> @interface ListNode : NSObject + (ListNode *)nodeWithValue:(id)value next:(ListNode *)next previous:(ListNode *)previous; @property (nonatomic, strong) ListNode *next; @property (nonatomic, strong) ListNode *previous; @property ...


1

Your print() function is recursive. It will go down the tree until it'll find a null leaf and print that message. Then it will print the rest. I propose following change: void print(Node * pp) { if(pp==NULL) { cout<<"Node sent to print is null"<<endl; return;} if (pp->left) print(pp->left); ...


0

In Shannon-Fano coding you need the following steps: A Shannon–Fano tree is built according to a specification designed to define an effective code table. The actual algorithm is simple: For a given list of symbols, develop a corresponding list of probabilities or frequency counts so that each symbol’s relative frequency of occurrence is ...


2

print(max(left_depth, right_depth) + 1) should be... return max(left_depth, right_depth) + 1 so that your .depth() method actually returns a value when called. Then, at the end when you actually want a result: print(tree.depth()) Also, it's a bit odd that you're using two different if-else constructs. left_depth = ...


0

As NPE said, the code isn't correct because the function returns an average, which the caller treats as a sum. A simple fix to your pseudo code would be: avg(T) = if (|T| = 1) return value sumleft = |Tleft | * avg(Tleft ) sumright = |Tright| * avg(Tright) sum = value + sumleft + sumright return sum / (|Tleft| + |Tright| + 1) You will need ...


1

So more formally, you are trying to find the number of nodes in a binary search tree such that the root of the tree has two children, and each subtree on the left has at most l children and each subtree on the right has r children. We can consider the left and right trees separately, since they don't affect each other's height. Disregarding the root, let's ...


1

You need to store the result of your recursive call. public Node findNodeById(int id,Node node){ if(node == null) return null; if(node.id == id) return node; Node leftNode = findNodeById(id, node.left); if(leftNode != null){ // Found node by searching left return leftNode; } Node rightNode = findNodeById(id,node.right); ...


4

findNodeById(id, node.left); findNodeById(id,node.right); return null; You aren't doing anything with the result of your recursive calls. Even after you have traversed down and if you find an id and return it up to the top of the call stack, null is going to be returned to the original caller (unless the first node called with has the id provided). A ...


1

No, the code is not correct. In the recursive calls, the callee returns[*] the average whereas the caller treats it as if it were the sum. [*] Well, it would if it were correct, which it isn't.


1

try updating i and returning its value private static int inorder(Node temp, int[] a, int i) { // base case if (temp == null) return i; // go to the right of tree i = inorder(temp.right, a, i); // copy node to array a[i] = temp.number; System.out.println(temp.number); System.out.println(i); i++; // go to the left of tree i = inorder(temp.left, a, i); ...


0

If you don't like global variable, pass to recursive function additional parameter - some int variable, let's call it auto_increment or just ai. ai stores order of current node. Also, recursive function should return maximal value of ai of current vertex subtree,because after visiting whole subtree next 'free' value will be max_ai_in_subreee+1 Something like ...


0

private int getMax(Node x) { if (x == null) { return 0; } int left = getMax(x.left); int right = getMax(x.right); return x.value + (left > right ? left : right); }


1

This problem is probably easiest to solve recursively. You find the smallest key of the left sub-tree. You find the smallest key of the right sub-tree. you compare the former two elements to each other and to the current node's element, and return the smallest of the 3 elements. Here's some pseudo code : KeyType getSmallestKey (Node root) { minLeft ...


0

In order iterative traversal, keep track of nodes passed in external variable. public static Node inOrderInterativeGet(Node root, int which){ Stack<Node> stack = new Stack<Node>(); Node current = root; boolean done = false; int i = 1; if(which <= 0){ return null; } while(!done){ if(current != ...


3

You can augment the binary search tree into an order statistic tree, which supports a "return the nth element" operation Edit: If you just want the ith element of an inorder traversal (instead of the ith smallest element) and don't want to use external variables then you can do something like the following: class Node { Node left Node right int data ...


2

You're not really using the information that you're getting from knowing the level that you're at. Think of it as indenting from the left most edge of the screen. Per level you want to indent it by 2*level spaces. From the output, it looks like a NULL node prints out NULL. You could try something along the lines of: Indent(Treenode *node, int level){ ...


0

First of all, you should also check if the first node, at level 0, has childs. Else you could run into an error if there is only one node in your tree. Second, I encourage you to use curling braces after the if statements, this is confusing and not very readable: if((node->_left != NULL) && (node->_right != NULL)) { cout << "\t"; ...


4

Here's another dynamic program. I'm going to assume that the root must be a pivot node. For each node u, let W[u] be the weight of u. For nodes u and v such that u = v or u is a proper descendant of v, let C[u, v] be the optimum cost of the subtree rooted at u given that u's leafmost pivot ancestor is v. Then we have a recurrence C[u, u] = W[u] + sum over ...


3

You could use dynamic programming where DP[i,k] represents the smallest cost of the subtree rooted at vertex i assuming that looking into the subtree we can see k regular vertices (the concept is that pivot nodes are opaque, while regular nodes are transparent). When working out the cost we use the normal logic everywhere except these k regular vertices. ...



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