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There can be one more approach. However it is not as efficient as the one already suggested in answers. Create a path vector for the node n1. Create a second path vector for the node n2. Path vector implying the set nodes from that one would traverse to reach the node in question. Compare both path vectors. The index where they mismatch, return the node ...


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The deletion needs only the pointer for the statements it executes. It is not passing any information back to the calling function. However, your insertion function allocates if needed, and in that case must pass back the allocated pointer to the caller.


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almost 4 years late. but here comes my functional solution. following is my code in haskell, complexity is also O(n): import Data.List hiding (insert) data Color = R | B deriving Show data RBTree a = RBEmpty | RBTree { color :: Color , ltree :: RBTree a , nod :: a ...


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The base case is when if: root evaluates to false. For instance when you call invertTree(root.right), if root.right does not exist, then in the invertTree call if: root will evaluate to false, and the function will return without calling invertTree again.


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== for compare Integer if you want to compare object you must use (ObjectA).equals(ObjectB) by the way you should call getter setter method is the better way!


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This is the approach I use for iterative, post-order traversal. I like this approach because: It only handles a single transition per loop-cycle, so it's easy to follow. A similar solution works for in-order and pre-order traversals Code: enum State {LEFT, RIGHT, UP, CURR} public void iterativePostOrder(Node root){ Deque<Node> parents = new ...


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You could search through the binary tree using Depth / Breadth first search. But make a few changes: Create a variable outside the function: int count = 0; Add an extra boolean parameter to your recursive function: public static int sizeBelow(Node x, boolean afterNode){ Once you hit the Node, use an if statement and set the boolean to true: ...


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Before we work out how to do this lets analyze the code below line by line... public static int sizeBelow (Node x, int y) { // y is very ambiguous if (t == null) {// I am guessing t should be x return 0; }else{ int count = 0; // the number of nodes below the depth barrier y int leftDepth = 0; // this will always be 0 since you never alter ...


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just modify the BST tree. For black node, do nothint. And for red node, exchange its left child and right child. In this case, a node can be justified red or black according to if its right child is larger than its left child.


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Here is code to find out parent node using a stack Data Structures. Stack<TreeNode> parentStack = new Stack<TreeNode>(); public static void inOrderTraversal(TreeNode root){ if(root != null){ if(parentStack.size()==0){ parentStack.push(root); } ...


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You can store a binary tree in a 1D array. 1 / \ 2 3 / \ / \ 4 5 6 7 The result array A is A = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] The left child of a node i is given by 2*i + 1, the right child is given by 2*i + 2, first node is 0 indexed. Exemple: left and right child of the 3rd node (index : 2) left child : 2*i + 1 = 2*2+1 = 5, ...


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As binary tree is the particular example of the Graph data structure, you can check the existent Graph representations, for instance, adjacency lists or adjacency matrix. These links may be helpful: Graph representation in Java http://www.quora.com/What-is-the-best-way-to-represent-a-Graph-in-Java


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You can use the value of node as index in the first array and the values of the children to be stored the second array. You can put the value of the left child as index 0 and the value of the right child to be with index 1. To mark that there is no left or right child you can use negative value or zero. To know the initial root element you can search for the ...


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I'm thinking of this way: each tree has an ID; each node has an ID; create table called nodes, in which fields are: tree_id, parent_node_id, value, id then u can rebuild this tree with one single query. For updating the tree, just update all nodes with tree corresponding tree ID..? I think organisation won't have too many employees that make ...


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See here, there is a C# implementation of sub-tree isomorphism. A brute force one and I am the coder:) Hope it can help.


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First things first... You should write unit tests to find functional bugs However you seem to have a bug here... while loop does not execute at all if(p!=null && prev.successor){ while(p!=null && !prev.successor){ prev=p; p=p.right; } } You may want to replace it with do-while


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Java is a pass by value language. This means that when you pass a variable to a method, either primitive or objects, the method cannot change that variable since it doesn't know anything about that variable. The method has it's own variable and assigning anything new to a argument variable only persist in that scope and does not mutate other bindings or ...


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I found the answer that I needed from this one. Create a Complete Binary Tree using Linked Lists w/o comparing node values Some of the other things I was pointed to, either weren't quite what I wanted, or didn't work past like 8 or so values.


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I assume that your tree are immutable trees so you never change any subtree (you don't do set-car! in Scheme parlance), but just you are constructing new trees from leaves or from existing trees. Then I would advise to keep in every node (or subtree) an hash code of that node. In C parlance, declare the tree-s to be struct tree_st { const unsigned ...


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Let us say we have T1 as parent tree and T2 as a tree which might be a subtree of T1. Do the following. Assumption made is T1 and T2 are binary tree without any balancing factor. 1) Search the root of T2 in T1. If not found T2 is not a subtree. Searching the element in BT will take O(n) time. 2) If the element is found, do pre-order traversal of T1 from ...


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The first code (1) is looking for the smallest node in your BST. You search from the root down the left side of the tree since the smallest valued node will be found in that location. You make several checks: root == null - to determine if the tree is empty. k == 0 - zero in this case is the smallest element. You are making this assumption based on ...


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Passing the parameter by reference allows you to keep track of the count within the recursive process, otherwise the count would reset. It allows you to modify the data within the memory space, thus changing the former value not the current/local value.


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Consider the following tree: 10 / \ 8 2 / \ / 3 5 2 Approach We start from the root and comĀ­pare it with the key, if they matched then print the path (if the tree has just one node then the path contains just the root). Else push the node into Vector (I considered vector for storing the path). Recursively Go left and ...


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In your implementation, you are using the variable k to pass two different piece of information: The remaining number of nodes before the target node is found. If the target node has already been found. What's missing is really just 2. You can achieve this by : i) Passing k as reference instead of value. ii) Assign meaning of 2.) above by value 0 of k. ...


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I'm not convinced this isn't a homework assignment, but here goes. The null exception is because you are still calling removeLeaves() even when both the left and right sides are null. Have you tried putting an else after your main IF()? public static void removeLeaves(BinaryTreeNode<Integer> root) { if(root == null) { return; // ...


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In Naftalin, Walder Java Collections and Generics I've faced with this implementation that I love best: public interface TreeVisitor<E, R> { public R visit(E leaf); public R visit(E value, Tree<E> left, Tree<E> right); } public abstract class Tree<E> { public abstract <R> R accept(TreeVisitor<E, R> ...


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You need to check each root individually for null. Your if statement if(root.left==null && root.right==null) { BinaryTreeNode<Integer> temp = null; root = temp; } only checks if both roots are null. But say there is no left leaf (root.left is null) and there is only a right leaf, you still execute on the left side ...


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Something like this?: public class BinaryTree { private List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>(); public class BinaryTreeNode { private int p; public BinaryTreeNode(int p) { this.p = p; } private BinaryTreeNode getChild(int childP){ BinaryTreeNode result= null; ...


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When you say 'in order' you need to clarify, do you mean in sorted order or do you mean insertion order, etc. There are lots of resources available on inserting into binary trees or the difference between to types of binary trees, or how to print a binary tree diagram, that I suspect this is a duplicate. What is different about your example? Having '1' as ...


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BinaryTreeNode<Integer> temp = null; root = temp; basically sets root to null and then you call root.left => NPE You might want to add the necessarily null checks, and probably rethink your function as a whole.


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In your if statement if(root.left==null && root.right==null) { BinaryTreeNode<Integer> temp = null; root = temp; } You are declaring root as temp, which is null, then pass that temp into the removeLeaves function. So you are passing null into that function when the if statement is true.


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max depth takes root. root is node, its value is 1. As a node it has a left and a right node. the left node of root has also a left and a right node. so the tree looks like: 1 -> 2 -> 4 | | -> 5 |--> 3 maxDepth takes the element 1 it looks if the parameter is null, since 1 is not null it calls max depth for the left node 2 and the right ...


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Do the values increment with every recursive process? Not exactly. The recursion goes deeper as long as there are child nodes. Once it satisfies 'if(node==NULL)', that is, there are no more leafs, it will return 0 to the calling node. Only then the value is incremented where it reaches 'return (ldepth+1);'


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You need to take it in two separate steps. A pattern matcher matches a pattern against a tree, and builds a dictionary mapping variables in the pattern to values in the tree. Then you pass that dictionary to a separate function that fills in the replacement, by replacing variables with their values from the dictionary. The pattern matching approach ...


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Better approaches are normally have: Better time or/and space complexity. Readable code. Manages edge cases better. I believe that it will produce smaller code most of the times. If we look at your code : static Node lca(Node root,int v1,int v2) { Node r = root; if( r == null){ return null; } else if(r.data == v1 || r.data == ...


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Well, here's how I would approach the problem. This relies on the fact that you're dealing with a binary search tree. For any given node, it can be the LCA if and only if min(v1, v2) is in its left subtree, and max(v1, v2) is in its right subtree. If this isn't true, then the current node clearly can't be an ancestor, because either v1 or v2 cannot be a ...


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If you define a constructor (or any method) inside a class definition, don't specify the scope: template <class Item> class bTNode{ public: /* Avoid this part: template <class Item> bTNode<Item>:: */ bTNode(Item data = Item(), bTNode<Item>* parent = NULL, bTNode<Item>* l = NULL, bTNode<Item>* r = NULL) { treeData = ...


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From Wikipedia: The trace of a traversal is called a sequentialisation of the tree. The traversal trace is a list of each visited root node. No one sequentialisation according to pre-, in- or post-order describes the underlying tree uniquely. Given a tree with distinct elements, either pre-order or post-order paired with in-order is sufficient to ...


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following combination can uniquely identify a tree. Inorder and Preorder. Inorder and Postorder. Inorder and Level-order. And following do not. Postorder and Preorder. Preorder and Level-order. Postorder and Level-order. For more infomation refer:Geeksforgeek


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Your approach will work not because, when you call left or right subtree you will just stick to it. The problem with this approach is you are just driven by which side of the tree is called first. May be you can solve it by using stack and queue as somebody else said but i feel that the following is a simpler and more intuitive approach: (SEE THE CODE AT ...


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This problem can be very easily solved by using: Solution 1 Stack: To print the root and the left subtree. Queue: To print the right subtree. Your function should be like this: void topview(Node root) { if(root==null) return; Stack<Integer> s=new Stack<Integer>(); s.push(root.data); Node root2=root; ...


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I used python to solve this problem (all code is attached, entire script in the end), but I'm sure similar libraries for the solution exist for PHP. Since this is old and no solutions were posted, I'm guessing any solution (in this case, the Python solution) is better than no solution. The script consists of two function, one calculates the available ...


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Based on the very helpful link send by @poorvank_bhatia my solution in java is this: public void printPostorder(BinaryNode node){ if( node == null) return; printPostorder(node.getLeft()); printPostorder(node.getRight()); System.out.print(node.toString()+ " "); numberOfNodes++; } public int getNumberOfNodes(){ return ...


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Dear first Use relative layout as parent and then add text view child.i did not add relative layout add relative layout as parent. <TextView android:id="@+id/txttxt1" android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="node" android:textColor="@color/white" ...


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public class MinMax { public void printMinMaxNumbers(int[] nums){ int min = nums[0]; int max = nums[1]; for(int n:nums){ if(n < min){ min = n; } else if(n > max){ max = n; } } System.out.println("Minimum Number: "+min); System.out.println("Maximum Number: "+max); } public static ...


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What i understand from your question is that you simply have to check for a complete binary tree by doing a level order traversal starting from root. During the traversal, once you find a node which is NOT a Full Node (A node is Full Node if both left and right children are not empty), all the following nodes must be leaf nodes. If a node has empty left ...


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void addHeights(class tree* root, int depth, int& sum) { if(root) { addHeights(root->left, depth+1, sum); addHeights(root->right, depth+1, sum); sum += depth; } }


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You misunderstand what friend declarations do. Saying that A is a friend of B means that A gains access to protected and private members of B. It allows A to call private functions of B, for example. It does not extend the interface of A or B in any way. If I understand correctly what you're trying to achieve, you should be able to do that by having size ...


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I think it should be clear and simple now. First, please re-index the nodes in a standard order: 1 / \ 2 3 / \ / \ 4 5 6 7 / \ / \ / \ / \ 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Consider a row, for example: 4, 5, 6, 7 The first node ...


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The code looks mostly OK to me. Here's a mildly modified version, mainly with a tree printing function added, and some diagnostics, and an extended tree. My suspicion is that you expected your tree to have just 2 levels, but it actually had 3. Code #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> typedef struct slist { int value; struct slist* ...



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