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4

We don't know on which operating system you are coding. But I am guessing it is Linux (or at least some POSIX). Then my advice is to avoid system(3) and use something else, such as fork(2), execve(2), waitpid(2); take time to read Advanced Linux Programming for details (they could be tricky to you). BTW, you are naive in thinking that by removing the ...


4

You're looking for de2bi with the 'left-msb' option. data = 14 out = de2bi(data, 4,'left-msb') Which requires the Communication Systems Toolbox though. Alternatively use your original approach with the fundamental dec2bin with the following addition: data = 14 out = double( dec2bin(data, 4) ) - 48 out = 1 1 1 0


4

UPDATE Added comparison and benchmarks at the end Here's another take, based on a perfect hash. The perfect hash was generated using gperf (like described here: Is it possible to map string to int faster than using hashmap?). I've further optimized by moving function local statics out of the way and marking hexdigit() and hash() as constexpr. This removes ...


3

I have this strange feeling that I must be missing something important about the question here. At first glance, it seems like this should work: template <class RanIt, class OutIt> void make_hex(RanIt b, RanIt e, OutIt o) { static const char rets[] = "0123456789ABCDEF"; if ((e-b) %4 != 0) throw std::runtime_error("Length must be a ...


3

Here's how I would do it: Find the smallest positive integer n such that these integers all have different remainders modulo n: 0x30303030 0x30303031 0x30303130 0x30303131 0x30313030 0x30313031 0x30313130 0x30313131 0x31303030 0x31303031 0x31303130 0x31303131 0x31313030 0x31313031 0x31313130 0x31313131 These are the ASCII representations of ...


3

UPDATE2 See here for my perfect-hash based solution. This solution would have my preference because It compiles a lot faster It has more predictable runtime (there are zero allocations going on, since all data is static) EDIT indeed now benchmarking has shown the perfect hash solution to be roughly 340 x faster than the Spirit approach. See here: ...


3

To get the first 8 bits, just shift it to the right by 8 bits. 0011000100110000 >> 8 == 00110001 To get the last 8 bits, mask it with 0b11111111, i.e. 255. 0011000100110000 & 0000000011111111 ------------------- 0000000000110000 Code example: In [1]: n = int("0011000100110000", 2) In [2]: n Out[2]: 12592 In [8]: n >> ...


2

I would think that a simple loop with a running index should work fine. Calls to Math.Log will definitely not be faster, nor will De Bruijn bit hacking operations. If it were possible to do assembly/intrinsics to find leading/trailing 0s in c# possibly something better could be done. For now, I would suggest the simple loop, with an additional termination ...


2

Make use of the bin built in function def split16Bit(num): binary = bin(num)[2:].rjust(16, '0') return (int(binary[:8], 2), int(binary[8:], 2))


2

If your desired result is bitwise manipulation (as in): 10101011 +11011100 =11111111 Then you need to use bitwise or (|) uint8_t a = 0x23; uint8_t b = 0xDC; uint8_t c = a | b; If you want to do simple addition, such as: 00000001 +00000011 =00000100 Then that is just addition. uint8_t a = 1; uint8_t b = 2; uint8_t c = a + b;


2

Instead of returning 1 why don't you return the value itself? That is after all the base case for your recursion. i.e. def subt_tree(bnt): if not isinstance(bnt,tuple): return bnt else: return subt_tree(bnt[0]) - subt_tree(bnt[1]) If you return 1 you'll only ever get a set of values consisting of 1 being subtracted from each ...


2

The most "important" definition of what the word "binary" means comes from just a situation where a number can take on one of two values. Whatever you call those doesn't strictly matter ("on"/"off", "1"/"0", "yes"/"no"). All that matters is that there are just two states. Keep that core definition in mind. But you will find a large number of other ...


2

something like this maybe #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <iomanip> #include <sstream> int main() { std::cout << std::hex << std::stoll("100110110010100100111101010001001101100101010110000101111111111",NULL, 2) << std::endl; std::stringstream ss; ss << std::hex << ...


2

This seems to work. std::vector<char> binaryVecStr = { '0', '0', '0', '1', '1', '1', '1', '0' }; string binToHex; binToHex.reserve(binaryVecStr.size()/4); for (uint32_t * ptr = reinterpret_cast<uint32_t *>(binaryVecStr.data()); ptr < reinterpret_cast<uint32_t *>(binaryVecStr.data()) + binaryVecStr.size() / 4; ++ptr) { switch (*ptr) ...


2

This is the fastest I could come up with: #include <iostream> int main(int argc, char** argv) { char buffer[4096]; while (std::cin.read(buffer, sizeof(buffer)), std::cin.gcount() > 0) { size_t got = std::cin.gcount(); char* out = buffer; for (const char* it = buffer; it < buffer + got; it += 4) { ...


2

Three digits is eight, 2^3=8. Specifically the values 0 to 7. Four digits is sixteen, 2^4=16. Specifically the values 0 to 15. It's the same for any base. Three digits for decimal is 10^3 or 1000 which is 0 to 999, and three hexadecimal digits is 16^3 which is 4096 or 0 to 4095.


1

You can make a mask that has the leftmost bit, and then shift it right positionX times to make the proper mask: int topBit = 1<<16; // 10000000 00000000 int mask = topBit >> position1; Now you can use mask to set or to clear the target bit, like this: int b = a | mask; // Set 12-th bit to 1 int c = a & ~mask; // Set 12-th bit to 0


1

static int[][] p = {{7,104},{5,101},{12,114}}; static int bit( int[][] p, int row, int col ){ return (p[row][col/7] >> (7 - col%7 - 1)) & 1; } col/7 produces 0 and 1 for the ranges 0-6 and 7-14. col%7 results in values 0,1,...6. Thus, the shift shifts 6,5,...0 times. public static void main(String[] args)throws Exception { for( int r = 0; ...


1

You could "encrypt" the string and store the crypted version. Then when the program needs the ASCII string, decrypt it. The most simple encrypter is to do a bitwise xor with a random pattern of bits. To decrypt simply do the same bitwise xor with exacly the same random pattern of bits. You will need to save the string length along with the encrypted ...


1

You need to first work out the format of the file from which you are extracting information, then write code to extract it. A good starting point would be The SQLite Database File Format. The first part of that string you give (53514C69746520666F726D6174203300) is ASCII hex for SQLite format 3<nul>, which matches the header shown in that link above, ...


1

Well, I had the same trouble ... so I found this thread I think the answer from user:"pmg" does not work always. unsigned int int_to_int(unsigned int k) { return (k == 0 || k == 1 ? k : ((k % 2) + 10 * int_to_int(k / 2))); } Reason: the binary representation is stored as an integer. That is quite limited. Imagine converting a decimal to binary: dec ...


1

It is not easy to see exactly what you are trying to do, but something simplified along these lines might work. Specifically, instead of filing the whole buffer memory, only the length indicated in its struct is written. #define MSGSIZE 1400 typedef struct { int len; char payload[MSGSIZE]; } msg; int process_msg(int size) { msg ack = {4, ...


1

Normal Fortran I/O uses a record structure. If you want unformatted I/O while keeping the record structure, I would recommend open(15,file="sce.dat", form="unformatted") do iw=1,52 ! Better to use named constants here write (15) x(:,iw) end do This writes out the values in the natural Fortran array order, where the storage order is a(1,1), ...


1

As for a simple way to do this, i think that this one is pretty neat: std::string bintxt_2_hextxt(const std::string &bin) { std::stringstream reader(bin); std::stringstream result; while (reader) { std::bitset<8> digit; reader >> digit; result << std::hex << digit.to_ulong(); } ...


1

You could try a binary decision tree: string binToHex; for (size_t i = 0; i < binaryVecStr[a].size(); i += 4) { string tmp = binaryVecStr[a].substr(i, 4); if (tmp[0] == '0') { if (tmp[1] == '0') { if (tmp[2] == '0') { if tmp[3] == '0') { binToHex += "0"; } else { ...


1

So yeah.. I have fixed the problem and I am pretty ashamed to share what was causing it :D Basically, I had mixed up the indexes for top and bottom rows: !digit_grid[i + 1][j] should be !digit_grid[i - 1][j] for top and the reverse one for bottom... I am sorry for this mistake and wasting your time :D Thanks for all advices!


1

No, it doesn't look like it. The Read method goes through all of the work of deciphering what it needs to read .. then all of the actual read methods have this: d.order..... So basically, they use the ByteOrder you've specified directly .. and make no attempt (via struct tags or anything else) to let you specify it on a per-field basis. Unfortunate .. ...



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