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0

You can remove the file from history and stop tracking it by git rm --cached FILE possibly you want to add the FILE to .gitignore and add that too git add .gitignore git commit -m "removed binary FILE from index" git filter-branch --index-filter "git rm -rf --cached --ignore-unmatch FILE" HEAD Now your history should be cleaned. Though this should ...


1

This is not a traditional algorithm to generate 2's complement, so I am not sure if it helps you in understanding binary conversion, but you can do this in ruby to help check your answers. Note: This applies to negative number's only. 32.downto(0).map { |n| -4294966296[n] }.join => "100000000000000000000001111101000" For 2's complement computation, ...


3

I am not fond of this approach since I'm sure there's an even more clever and/or compact, Ruby-esque way of accomplishing it. But using your method of loading binary digits into an array, and then joining, what you have can be done in a little more straight-forward fashion: def to_binary(n) return "0" if n == 0 r = [] 32.times do if (n & (1 ...


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A simple solution that works (and that I've used myself) is to add an enum/int at the beginning of your serialization that says which concrete object the following data is going to represent. In your deserialize function, you're going to read the first byte, instantiate the proper object through a factory and then call the new object's own virtual ...


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Requires org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils, but this makes it a short one: final int digits = 4; final int onesrequired = 2; int maxindex = (int) Math.pow(2, digits); for (int i = 0; i < maxindex; i++) { String binaryStr = Integer.toBinaryString(i); if (StringUtils.countMatches(binaryStr, "1") == onesrequired) { ...


3

This can be solved using recursive function calls: public class BinarySequences { public static void main(String[] args) { final int numCount = 4; final int oneCount = 2; checkSubString(numCount, oneCount, ""); for (String res : results) { System.out.println(res); } } private static ...


2

If you want to preserve the 0s, then just add padding: int end = 100; //Change this for (int i = 0; i <= end; i++) { String bytestring = Integer.toBinaryString(i); String padding = "00000000000000000000000000000000"; bytestring = padding.substring(0, 32 - bytestring.length()) + bytestring; System.out.println(bytestring); }


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Try this: //Edit your min and max, e.g. Integer.MAX_VALUE and Integer.MIN_VALUE int min = 0; int max = 10; for(int i = min; i < max; i++){ //Make 16 bit long binary Strings String s = String.format("%16s", Integer.toBinaryString(i)).replace(' ', '0'); //Make 4 bits long chunks List<String> chunks = new ArrayList<>(); ...


0

Two's complement (wiki) is the standard way to represent binary numbers. Some notes: The subtraction is done by converting negative number to twos-complement representation. Then apply addition instead. Using two's complements, no need to borrow at all, instead just apply normal carry-bit rule. Example (assume 8 bit signed integers are used): 12 - 69 = ...


2

Since it appears you already know which squares to make black and which not, you could just use pillow to generate an image. You'll need to use ImageDraw and Image. What you need to do is something like: from PIL import Image, ImageDraw im = Image.new('1', (width, height), color=1) # Background white draw = ImageDraw.Draw(im) draw.point((x, y), 0) # Draw ...


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You can always align your memory yourself: uint8_t msg[TOTAL_SIZE_OF_THE_PARTS_OF_MsgData]; As sizeof(MsgData) returns the size of MsgData + padding bytes, you can calculate enum { TOTAL_SIZE_OF_THE_PARTS_OF_MsgData = 2*sizeof(uint8_t)+ 3*sizeof(float)+sizeof(THE_OTHER_FIELDS) } Using enums for such constants is a well proven concept on ...


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So if I were using the & operator, how do I use $2 instead of explicitly using the number 93 or 128? I'm just not clear on the correct syntax. I tried the below, but clearly its not correct. samtools view hg19_100bp_30cov.bam | sort -k 3,3 -k4,4n | awk '{if echo $((('$2' & 0x40) != 0)) != 0)) print $1; else {}}' > out.txt


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I found ''.join(map(lambda x: chr(x % 256), data)) to be painfully slow (~4 minutes) for my data on python 2.7.9, where a small change to str(bytearray(map(lambda x: chr(x % 256), data))) only took about 10 seconds.


4

As noted by Felipe Lema, Base delegates BigInt printing to GMP, which can print BigInts without doing any intermediate computations with them – doing lots of computations with BigInts to figure out their digits is quite slow and ends up allocating a lot of memory. The bottom line: doing x >>= 1 is extremely efficient for things like Int64 values but ...


3

>>> import struct >>> struct.pack('!d', 25.1) b'@9\x19\x99\x99\x99\x99\x9a' >>> struct.unpack('!d', _) #NOTE: no need to call byt1hex, unhexlify (25.1,) You send, receive bytes over the network. No need hexlify/unhexlify them; unless the protocol requires it (you should mention the protocol in the question then).


0

You have: test = "x40\x39\x19\x99\x99\x99\x99\x9A" You need: test = "\x40\x39\x19\x99\x99\x99\x99\x9A"


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simple code to implement the flipping bits - #include<stdio.h> main(){ unsigned x = 5; printf("%u",~x); }


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Using julia's profiling tools I can see that Base.bin is calling a C function from libGMP, which has all sorts of machine specific optimizations (somewhere here is mpn_get_str that is being called). @profile bin1(x,1000001) Profile.print() Profile.clear() @profile bin2(x,1000001,a,true) Profile.print() Profile.clear() I could also see a huge difference ...


0

What Vlad said... Basically the reason that the LEFT/RIGHT parts are always null is because you are passing a reference-type object by value, and then call new C_Nodo() on it - this creates a pointer to a new location for your object. So you can either use Vlad's solution and pass it by reference, or you can change your insert and insert_Order methods to ...


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a and b have same binary representation as char. But when comparison operation is performed on a and b, they are first converted to int. a is a signed char, when it is converted to an int, its value becomes -5 (signed value of 0xfb). b is unsigned char, when it is converted to an int, its value becomes 251. The values -5 and 251 have different ...


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Well, here is a short function for scaling down images. public static Image ScaleDownTo(Image image, int height, int width) { if (image != null) { if (image.Width > width || image.Height > height) { float factor = Math.Max(((float)width) / image.Width, ((float)height) / image.Height); if (factor ...


3

bash has bitwise operators Test 7th bit: $ echo $(((93 & 0x40) != 0)) 1 $ echo $(((128 & 0x40) != 0)) 0 See also the bash documentation Though if you're parsing the values out of a file, you're probably better off continuing to use awk, as the answer of @RakholiyaJenish


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You can use bitwise operation to check if 7th bit is 1 in gawk: and($2,0x40) Note: Standard awk does not have bitwise operation. So for that you can use bash bitwise operation or perl bitwise operation (for string processing). Using gawk: gawk '(and($2,0x40)){print $1}' filename Using perl: perl -ane 'print "$F[0]\n" if ($F[1]&0x40)' filename


0

I'm using this: def size(b64string): return (len(b64string) * 3) / 4 - b64string.count('=', -2) We remove the length of the padding, which is either no, one or two characters =, as explained here. Probably not optimal. I don't how efficient str.count(char) is. On the other hand, it is only performed on a string of length 2.


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In general .bin files are not executable by high-level operating systems, since they don't contain enough information (which is why typical operating systems use other file formats for programs; ELF is common). If your OS can run properly-prepared .bin files, only you know how to make it happen.


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Declare the function like public void insert_Order( ref C_Nodo tree, int inf ); Also as this function is an auxiliary function for function inserta then it could be declared like private


1

Your loop is incorrect: you should be shifting demonExp to the right too. It runs indefinitely for numerator=0 and an even denomExp. If numerator and denomExp are integer types, and the number is just a fraction numerator/denomExp, you can fix the code this way: while (numerator && is_even(numerator) && is_even(denomExp)) { numerator ...


0

Finally I got answer of my question: Add: https://github.com/eligrey/Blob.js/ Add: https://github.com/eligrey/FileSaver.js/ Here is the code: var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhr.open("POST", baseURLDownload+"/service/report/QCPReport", true); xhr.setRequestHeader("Content-type","application/json"); ...


0

If you have a lot of binary data to read, you might want to consider the struct module. It is documented as converting "between C and Python types", but of course, bytes are bytes, and whether those were created as C types does not matter. For example, if your binary data contains two 2-byte integers and one 4-byte integer, you can read them as follows ...


0

decimal to binary / use for for(int q=0;number>0;q++){ if((number%2) == 0) cout<<"0"; else cout<<"1"; then reversved result exsample : #inculde <iostream> using namespace std; int main(){ int number=14; for(int q=0;number>0;q++){ if((number%2) == 0) cout<<"0"; else cout<<"1"; ...


0

solved! Binary to JavaScript Converter. var bin = "some binary coded javascript" var output = ""; function convertBinary(str) { if(str.match(/[10]{8}/g)){ var js = str.match(/([10]{8})/g).map(function(fromBinary){ return String.fromCharCode(parseInt(fromBinary, 2) ); }).join(''); //console.log(js); output = ...


2

You can use eval function, like this: eval(output) or the Function constructor, like this: var init = new Function(output) init()


1

You can use new Function for that. It wraps your code into a function like this: var fn = new Function(output); fn(); Or shorter: new Function(output)(); Which is the equivalent of: function(){ var newElement = document.createElement("h1"); var element = document.createTextNode("Hello World!"); newElement.appendChild(element); ...


4

You're looking for eval. It explicitly invokes the compiler for you on a string and runs it as JavaScript. eval("alert('hi');"); // evaluates the string and executes it as code As an alternative, you can treat the code as a function body (with arguments) and call the Function constructor on it. var converted = var binary = convertBinary("..."); ...


1

bgrep's search result are formatted this way: printf("%s: %08llx\n", filename, (unsigned long long)(offset + o - len)); Hence, it displays the filename, and then the hex offset where the search string started, as illustrated here: $ xxd test_27.6.2015.bin | grep 5ee0 0005ee0: 0c89 0c88 fafa fafa 585e 0000 fe5a 1eda ........X^...Z..


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You can pad the result with starting zero by using PadLeft. s2.PadLeft(4, "0")


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There are libraries (zip.js comes to mind) for handling this sort of thing, assuming you want to get at what is in the zip file. If you just want to save the zip file, you would treat it like any other file.


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I tested the linked code. The problem is the algorithm to convert from number ("count") to binary ("str1"). I made three changes, corruptdna must replace next codes in your code and run it: 1. Added one more byte to variable "str1" to store '$' at the end and display it with int 21h, ah=9 : STR1 DB 5 DUP('$') 2. Changed the algorithm to ...


2

As stated in the documentation for parseInt: The parseInt() function parses a string argument and returns an integer of the specified radix (the base in mathematical numeral systems). So, it is doing exactly what it should do: converting a binary value of 11 to an integer value of 3. If you are trying to convert an integer value of 11 to a binary value ...


2

The parseInt() function parses a string argument and returns an integer of the specified radix (the base in mathematical numeral systems). So you are telling the system you want to convert 11 as binary to an decimal. Specifically to the website you are referring, if you look closer it is actually using JS to issue a HTTP GET to convert it on web server ...


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parseInt(number, base) returns decimal value of a number presented by number parameter in base base. And 11 is 3 in binary number system.


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Use toString() instead of parseInt: 11..toString(2) var str = "11"; var bin = (+str).toString(2); console.log(bin) According JavaScript's Documentation: The following examples all return NaN: parseInt("546", 2); // Digits are not valid for binary representations


0

You can use the concept of Wrapper Classes to directly convert a decimal to binary,hexadecimal and octal.Below is a very simple program to convert decimal to reverse binary .Hope it contributes to your java knowledge public class decimalToBinary { public static void main(String[] args) { int a=43;//input String ...


0

I feel that you have a problem in understanding the Integer Division. In integer division, 3/2 does not equal to 1.5 but instead it is 1. So similarly 1/2 is not equal to 0.5 but instead it is 0. Since variable v is integer the division by integer 2 is always integer division. So your variable v will ultimately reach 0.


0

Think to start with n=10 so v=8 the system will print 1010 and the iterations are: 1 - 10>8 else statement so print 1 and: n=2, v=4 2 - 2<4 if statement so print 0 and: v=2 3 - 2=2 else statement so print 1 and: n=0, v=1 4 - 0<1 if statement so print 0 and: n=0, v=1/2 that is 0 as integer During the next iteration while ...


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v is an int, and in Java 1/2 as an int gives 0. Your loop goes through all the powers of two so will reach one, and then 0. Run it in a debugger to see!


0

This might help. The main sub (AddOne) is agnostic between 0-based and 1-based arrays. The test sub runs in a fraction of a second: Sub AddOne(binaryVector As Variant) 'adds one to an array consisting of 0s and 1s 'the vector is modified in place 'all 1's wraps around to all 0's Dim bit As Long, carry As Long, i As Long, ub As Long, lb As Long carry ...


-1

You could try: bool i[8] = {0,0,1,1,0,1,0,1}


1

Since you haven't asked a concrete question, which can be answered in terms of code, I can say this: The key to recursion is not following every invocation and stick to the invocation maze, it is reading the code(for the recursive invocation) and believe what the recursive invocation is supposed to do, what it is supposed to do. Better be sure about the ...


1

Here's another way using magrittr's pipe: binNeighbours <- function(a, numNeighbours = ceiling(log2(a))) { rep(a, numNeighbours) %>% outer(., seq(.) - 1, function(x, y) x %/% (2 ^ y) %% 2) %>% `diag<-`(., 1 - diag(.)) %>% `%*%`(2 ^(0:(nrow(.) - 1))) %>% `[`(, 1) }



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