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4

If you are working with fasta files use BioPython, to get n sequences use random.sample: from Bio import SeqIO from random import sample with open("foo.fasta") as f: seqs = SeqIO.parse(f,"fasta") print(sample(list(seqs), 2)) Output: [SeqRecord(seq=Seq('GAGATCGTCCGGGACCTGGGT', SingleLetterAlphabet()), id='chr1:1154147-1154167', ...


4

Similarity of 6/8 between posH and posI, looks like you want inverse of hamming distance (i.e. 1-d). You can compute inverse hamming distance between two sequences using: def inverse_hamming_distance(a,b): z = list(zip(a, b)) return sum(e[0]==e[1] for e in z) / len(z) and it gives: >>> inverse_hamming_distance('CCCCCCCC', 'ACCCACCC') ...


3

You should look into regular expressions: import re max(re.findall(r'ATG(?:(?!TAA|TAG|TGA)...)*(?:TAA|TAG|TGA)',s), key = len) There is a good tutorial here, that focuses on the use of regular expressions with DNA strings


2

Thanks, @jdussault ! SELECT ?term (group_concat(distinct ?syn ; separator = "|") AS ?synset) ?extid FROM <http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/BTO> WHERE { ?extid <http://bioportal.bioontology.org/metadata/def/prefLabel> ?term . ?extid <http://www.geneontology.org/formats/oboInOWL#hasRelatedSynonym> ?syn . } group by ?term . ...


2

A mapping (aka a dictionary) is probably what you want? def dna2rna(s): mapping = {'A': 'U', #RNA has uracil. Not thymine. 'T': 'A', 'C': 'G', 'G': 'C', } out = [] for i in s.replace(' ',''): #get rid of spaces #if you have tabs and newlines, you may have to regex this instead ...


2

Another approach: # create dataframe mydf <- as.data.frame(x, stringsAsFactors=FALSE) # create temporary values based on REF and ALT mydf$REFval <- diag(as.matrix(mydf[, mydf$REF])) mydf$ALTval <- diag(as.matrix(mydf[, mydf$ALT])) Here in the next step, you said to sum ALT "if the ALT letters are unique" but didn't specify which value to use if ...


2

Here's a way to do it all, vectorised. First, note that REF is the same regardless of type. We can look it up quickly by using REF as a coordinate into the matrix, so e.g. row 1 has REF C, so if we look up coordinates (1, "C") we get the REF value for that row. # the REFs are the same regardless of TYPE rownames(x) <- 1:nrow(x) ref <- ...


2

Well, you are adding a 1 to the index at which are finding the shorter sequence - start = long_sequence.index(short_sequence) + 1 <--- notice the +1 Don't do that and it should be fine. Also do not do -1 for the stop variable. You should instead add the starting sequence number from the id. Example - start = long_sequence.index(short_sequence) + ...


1

You can use multiple argument passing (*args) to pass multiple arguments to your function and use yield to return a generator contain all the dictionaries : def kmer_count(k,*args): f = {} for dna in args: for x in range(len(dna)+1-k): kmer = dna[x:x+k] f[kmer] = f.get(kmer, 0) + 1 yield(f) And if you want to get the result as ...


1

you should ask such question on http://www.biostars.org/ I wrote a blast2html xslt stylesheet : see: https://www.biostars.org/p/6635/ http://plindenbaum.blogspot.fr/2008/05/ncbi-blast-xslt-xhtml-svg.html


1

From your expected output, it would appear that you simply add the last 2 numbers of each line to the first number and subtract one. import re # regular expressions, not needed (alternatives: the `split` method) but convenient re_pattern = r'[^:]*:(\d+)\D+(\d+)\D+(\d+)\D+(\d+)' with open(inputfile) as fin: for line in fin: start, _, ...


1

A more general solution: Take your reference sequence data and make it BLAT-ready with the relevant UCSC Kent Tools. Do a BLAT search to align short query strings against the reference data and get a PSL file. Convert the PSL output to BED.


1

EDITED 1: Completely rewritten to better match problem description. I don't know the exact file format here, so am assuming it carries on the same way as the three sequences you show -- one sequence after another. If I understand correctly, the reason you didn't see a match in the third sequence is that there actually isn't a match there. There are ...


1

Update TL;DR: You should change $value =~ /($localEpitope)/g to $value =~ /$localEpitope/ Okay now that we know the real circumstances, the problem (as melpomene points out in his comment) is that you have the /g modifier on your pattern match. There's no reason for that; you don't want check how many times the substring appears, you just want to know ...


1

Your code looks good, but there are particular things that could be improved, such as the use of map, etc. For good guide on performance tips in Python see: https://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonSpeed/PerformanceTips I have used the above tips to get code working nearly as fast as C code. Basically, try to avoid for loops (use map), try to use find built-in ...


1

You can combine re with some fancy zipping in list comprehensions that can replace the for loops and try to squeeze some performance gains. Below I outline a strategy for segmenting the data file read in as an entire string: import re from itertools import izip #(if you are using py2x like me, otherwise just use zip for py3x) s = open('test.txt').read() ...


1

When you have working code and need to improve performance, use a profiler and measure the effect of one optimization at a time. (Even if you don't use the profiler, definitely do the latter.) Your present code looks reasonable, that is, I don't see anything "stupid" in it in terms of performance. Having said that, it is likely to be worthwhile to use ...


1

Yes you could use some regular expressions to make extract the data in one-go; this is probably the best ratio of effort/performances. If you need more performances, you could use mx.TextTools to build a finite state machine; I'm pretty confident this will be significantly faster, but the effort needed to write the rules and the learning curve might ...


1

linearize and sort/uniq -c awk '/^>/ {if(N>0) printf("\n"); ++N; printf("%s ",$0);next;} {printf("%s",$0);} END { printf("\n");}' input.fa | \ sort -t ' ' -k2,2 | uniq -f 1 -c |\ awk '{printf("%s_%s\n%s\n",$2,$1,$3);}' >seqID_2_2 AGGGCACGCCTGCCTGGGCGTCACGC >seqID_1_1 CCCGGCCGTCGAGGC >seqID_3_3 CCGCATCAGGTCTCCAAGGTGAACAGCCTCTGGTCGA


1

The issue was that the file had CR line terminators and GNU tools were not detecting any line endings and therefore was reading the file as one huge line. I solved the issue by using mac2unix to convert the file to make it GNU line-ending readable. Thanks to Etan Reisner for providing the hint


1

Problem is because of this, pedazo += posiInicial You assigned empty string to pedazo variable, so it's a string. posiInicial variable contains integer. So python confuses on concatenating or doing + on string and integer. So change the value of pedazo to 0 pedazo = 0 cont += 1 posiFinal = posiInicial + 500 for posiInicial in xrange(posiFinal): ...


1

I'm not 100% sure what your desired output is, but if you just want to be collecting all the potential start codon positions and stop codon positions into your lists x and w (actually, allow me the liberty of renaming them startCodonPositions and stopCodonPositions), that's simple enough. In fact, it seems like your code for startCodonPositions is already ...


1

One option would be to: Create a 1-dimensional R-tree of the regions in one BED file. Insert a range for each exon. For each region in the other BED file, search the R-tree for intersections of each of that region's exons. For Java, there are multiple implementations of R-trees. One I've used that supports 1-dimensional ranges is SIRtree, in the library ...


1

I increased ResultSetMaxRows in the [SPARQL] section of virtuoso.ini from 10,000 to 100,000. My query for all anatomical synonyms is now roughly 35,000 rows long and includes "NK cell" There were several virtuoso.ini files in my system. I edited /opt/virtuoso-opensource/var/lib/virtuoso/db/virtuoso.ini


1

I also highly recommend this book, http://www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~ksung/algo_in_bioinfo/ And more recently, python is much more frequently used in bioinformatics than perl. So I really suggest you start with python, it is widely used in my projects.


1

I fixed this problem by setting recursive = FALSE in list.dirs(...).


1

Check out look at BioPython. Here is a solution using that: from Bio import SeqIO input_file = 'a.fasta' merge_file = 'original.fasta' output_file = 'results.fasta' exclude = set() fasta_sequences = SeqIO.parse(open(input_file),'fasta') for fasta in fasta_sequences: exclude.add(fasta.id) fasta_sequences = SeqIO.parse(open(merge_file),'fasta') with ...


1

In your code, positions is a defaultdict which has as keys the names from the BED file: >>> print positions.keys() ['chr10', 'chr6_apd_hap1'] And records is a dictionary which has as keys the headers of the FASTA file, minus the > at the beginning, but they still include the colon and the position on the chromosome: >>> print ...


1

I will recommend using pheatmap library. It not only provides a sensible default parameters but it is easily customizable as well. edata <- structure(list(Controll = c(1.88652404567248, 7.56216163122565, 5.14725899353288, 6.08609722473225, -0.299183966356617, 4.25027223369266, 5.45902343668683, 5.85281618559412, 2.93112975036833, 6.12522039745773 ), ...


1

Well the MSD is exactly as it sounds it is the mean square displacement so what you need to do is find the difference in the position (r(t + dt) -r(t)) for each position and then square it and finally take the mean. First you must find r from x and y which is easy enough. I am going to assume you are using numpy from here on out. import numpy as np ...



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