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Nevermind: Finally found a workaround! For anyone with the same problem: You can Iterate through all the internal nodes of a BioPython tree object given by the command tree.get_nonterminals() and set the internal node names to None. Since this tree.get_nonterminals() only outputs the internal nodes (not the leaves) the leave-names remain untouched. ...


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Yes, you can. It's documented here. Image you have a list of structure objects, let's name it structures. You might want to try: from bio import PDB pdb_io = PDB.PDBIO() target_file = 'all_struc.pdb' with pdb_file as open_file: for struct in structures: pdb_io.set_structure(struct[0]) pdb_io.save(open_file) That is the simplest ...


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For the sake of completeness, here is the 'final' script: #!/usr/bin/env python # a script to extract fasta records from a fasta file to multiple separate fasta files based on a particular ID (time point) in a particular field, for a given delimiter # to run, navigate to file location with command prompt and enter: python split_fasta_by_collections.py ...


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import sys print(sys.path) to see if the path of that module is in the path, if not, you may need to update the path to include it.


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I don't know if there is one for your command. For 'Primer3CommandLine', there is "Primer3" (http://biopython.org/DIST/docs/api/Bio.Emboss.Primer3.Primers-class.html). If you could use this class, you could make your life much easier by something like: from Bio.Emboss import Primer3 inputFile = "./wherever/your/outputfileis.out" ...


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I guess maybe using muscle directly is a better choice if there is anything unexpected when Aligning sequences via BioPython. In either way, it should be easy enough to do the MSA. But using Biopython may be a little more troubling.


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Cross-posting from https://www.biostars.org/p/89848/: You can obtain omega values for each branch using the following commands: from Bio.Phylo.PAML import codeml results = codeml.read(paml_outputfile) print results["NSsites"][0]["parameters"]["omega"] This gives you a list of omega (dn/ds) for each branch using version 4.7b and biopython-1.6.3


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Ok. Fixed! The problem was that in the python IDLE, the version of biopython was 1.63, whereas the code >>>from Bio.Phylo.TreeConstruction import DistanceCalculator, DistanceTreeConstructor works nice for version 1.65. So, the solution was delete the folder where biopython 1.63 was installed and download and later (re)install the biopython 1.65. ...


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I'm surprised that there is no preexisting function in Bio to do this type of search - it would seem a very common operation. Perhaps you need to spend some time with the documentation. Anyway, you could just use re.finditer() which will return an iterator returning match objects: import re from Bio.Seq import Seq def check_promoter(binding_element, ...



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