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Following this (Python's Regular Expression Source String Length), it seems that huge patterns break the re.compile. I'm on a x64 Linux, and I'm unable to "break" the re.compile even with re.compile("x"*5000000), while comenters on the linked question claims it breaks with 65536, in line with your 10Ks queries. Can you try using another computer or OS? ...


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First of all, I think your safest bet it to use Levenshtein distance with some library. But since you are tagging with Biopython, you can use pairwise: First you want to get rid of the "sequence=". You can slice each string or seqs = [x.split("=")[1] for x in ['sequence=AGATGG', 'sequence=AGCTAG', ...


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See Levenshtein distance: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levenshtein_distance. You'll find a large number of python libraries that implement this algorithm efficiently. I believe it is more appropriate for comparing such gene sequences (since it also handles inserts and deletions well).


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You can easily compute the total number of pairwise mismatches between two strings using sum and zip: >>> s1='AGATGG' >>> s2='AGATAA' >>> sum(c1!=c2 for c1,c2 in zip(s1,s2)) 2 if you have to deal with strings which are not of the same size, you might want to prefer from itertools import zip_longest instead of zip


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It's easy. You first import the CodonTables with: from Bio.Data import CodonTable and after that you can get the CodonTables with the number in the Genbank files: for feature in record.features: t_t = feature.qualifiers.get("transl_table") if t_t: print CodonTable.unambiguous_dna_by_id[int(t_t[0])] Take note you need to get an ...


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To add a taxon you have to explicitly create and add it to the tree: t1 = dendropy.Tree(stream=StringIO("(8,3)"),schema="newick") # Explicitly create and add the taxon to the taxon set taxon_1 = dendropy.Taxon(label="5") t1.taxon_set.add_taxon(taxon_1) # Create a new node and assign a taxon OBJECT to it (not a label) n = dendropy.Node(taxon=taxon_1, ...


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with open("file1.txt") as f, open("file2.txt") as f1: items = set(line.rstrip() for line in f) filtered = [line for line in f1 if " ".join(line.split()[::4]) in items] with open("file2.txt","w") as f3: f3.writelines(filtered)


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with open('file1', 'r') as f: keepers = set(tuple(line.split()) for line in f) with open('file2', 'r') as f_in, open('file3', 'w') as f_out: for line in f_in: parts = line.split() if (parts[0], parts[-1]) in keepers: f_out.write(line)


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The web page gives you the identity of some HSP, not the full alignment. E.g. these two HSPs: 1203 bits(651) 0.0 730/769(95%) 1/769(0%) Plus/Minus 106 bits(57) 6e-19 70/76(92%) 2/76(2%) Plus/Minus Give this count: Max Total Cover eVal ident 1203 1309 100% 0.0 95% So the web is simply adding the scores (1203 + ...


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You can try to access the annotations of the SeqRecord: seq_record=SeqIO.read(handle,"gb") nucleotide_accession = seq_record.annotations["db_source"] In your case nucleotide_accession is "REFSEQ: accession NM_000673.4" Now look if you can parse those annotations. With only this test case: nucl_id = nucleotide_accession.split()[-1] handle = ...


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import re print len(re.findall("abc", "abc123!@#654abcabc"))


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with open("in.txt") as f: joined = "" for ele in f: if len(ele.split()) == 1: name = ele.rstrip() else: joined += "{} {}".format(name, ele) with open("in.txt","w") as f1: f1.write(joined) output: r1 gene_1 1 181 r1 gene_2 220 300 r2 gene_1 1 295 r3 gene_1 39 278


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with open('path/to/input') as infile, open('path/to/output', 'w') as outfile: for line in infile: if not line.count('\t'): gene = line.strip() continue outfile.write(gene + '\t') outfile.write(line)


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This is what I came up with: def pattern_count(text, pattern): count = 0 for i in range(0, len(text) - len(pattern) + 1): if text[i : len(pattern) + i] == pattern: count += 1 return count We're using string slicing (text[i : len(pattern) + i]) to check if the sub-string matches the pattern. Input: text = ...


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You could read the file by string, and split each line by space: your_rearranged_lines = [] with open("yourFile") as file: for line in file: splitLine = line.split() # stores the first three tokens as normal, switches the fourth and fifth, # and stores the remaining tokens as normal rearranged_line = splitLine[0:4] + ...


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The Residue object have an attribute segid, a tuple with hetflag, resseq and icode that are passed on creation. So I guess you can access resseq with: resseq = residue.segid[1] But the "right" way is probably using get_full_id method from the Entity object, from which Residue inherits: resseq = residue.get_full_id()[3][1] # OR if you need the chain, ...


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This is too vague, and so is the answer. You can use a simple Seq Object from Biopython, loading the initial or source (full gene?) sequence: from Bio.Seq import Seq from Bio.Alphabet import IUPAC seq = Seq("ATCAGCATCAGCATCGACTAGCATCGCATCAGC", IUPAC.unambiguous_dna) # Select this ^^^^^^^^ ^^ print seq[3:10] + seq[20:23] # AGCATCAGCA


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That error tells you that sequences is not a set of SeqRecord objects. You cannot pass some string to the SeqIO.write. That's how it should be done: from Bio.Seq import Seq from Bio.SeqRecord import SeqRecord from Bio.Alphabet import IUPAC sequences = [] record = SeqRecord(Seq("KKPPLLRR", IUPAC.protein), id="My_protein") sequences.append(record) Now you ...



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