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There are several command line tools in Linux that give you human readable information from the BIOS. Maybe you can find your Video boards in there and see which one is made primary. From what I see in my output, it does not look like something says "this is the primary video", but I do see quite a lot of information. You could output that information to a ...


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for dell computers its possible to check if there is a password. objInstance.Properties_.Item("Password").Value have a look here and here


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Reason: Because you don't Bind Your MAC to Your Local IP Solution: Access to your router, use MAC Bing (or similar feature) Note: if you use 2 or more router before your PC, you have to Mac binding and and Port forwarding on ALL router


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The fact that you use ORG 0x7C00 implies that you set the segment registers to zero and not to the value already in CS. The BIOS function to reset the drive does not return anything in the sign flag SF. It does however change the carry flag CF. The partition table is located at offset 0x01BE of the bootsector and contains 4 16-byte entries. Your (currently ...


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If this is really a BIOS based system, rather than UEFI, then there is no universally available and reliable way to determine what disk will be booted from. For many BIOS versions, the disk booted by default may even change seemingly randomly from one boot to the next as devices are enumerated in different orders. If you want to reliably boot GNU/Linux on a ...


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If it's UEFI there are defined variables holding the boot order and a tool "efibootmgr" that can help you access them: http://linux.dell.com/files/efibootmgr/efibootmgr-0.5.4/efibootmgr.txt


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Here is the process I use in my kernel (note that this is 32bit). In my bootstrap assembly file, I tell GRUB to provide me with a memory map: .set MEMINFO, 1 << 1 # Get memory map from GRUB Then, GRUB loads the address of the multiboot info structure into ebx for you (this structure contains the address of the memory map). Then ...


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BIOS was designed for 16-bit machines. However, still you have three options to call BIOS interrupts in protected mode. Switch back to real mode and re-enter protected mode (Easiest approach). Use v86 mode (not available in 64-bit long mode). Write your own 16-bit x86 processor emulator (Hardest approach). I used first approach in my operating system for ...


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Yes, a power user can change nearly all serial numbers using either service utilities like AMI DMIEdit or by editing BIOS chip contents manually. Most desktop motherboards right now are coming with empty MBSN and UUID, except for ASUS ones. The only PCs that almost always have valid identification data are branded ones (i.e. Dell or HP workstations). Nearly ...



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