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13

You can use bitwise XOR : int x = 5; // 101 x = x ^ 1; // 100 Using your original example : int a = 11; System.out.println (a + " " + Integer.toBinaryString(a)); //11 1011 int b = a^1; System.out.println (b + " " + Integer.toBinaryString(b)); //10 1010


9

Here is one way, with a lookup table: static const unsigned short MortonTable256[256] = { 0x0000, 0x0001, 0x0004, 0x0005, 0x0010, 0x0011, 0x0014, 0x0015, 0x0040, 0x0041, 0x0044, 0x0045, 0x0050, 0x0051, 0x0054, 0x0055, 0x0100, 0x0101, 0x0104, 0x0105, 0x0110, 0x0111, 0x0114, 0x0115, 0x0140, 0x0141, 0x0144, 0x0145, 0x0150, 0x0151, 0x0154, 0x0155, ...


9

Discussing optimization without a specific hardware in mind doesn't make any sense. You really can't tell which alternative that is fastest without going into details of a specific system. Boldly making a statement about the first alternative being fastest without any specific hardware in mind, is just pre-mature optimization. The obscure xor solution might ...


9

No, both are 32 bit quantities - the width of an integer is fixed on a given platform. It's "shorter" because it's truncating all the leading 0's. You might want to do some reading on integer representation, specifically two's complement representation.


8

No it is how it gets represented internally, with positive number it has same number of bit to represent an int value it is just avoiding leading zeros


7

Try this. private static final long ZERO_OUT_LAST_32_BITS = 0xffffffff00000000L; public static void main(String[] args) { double number = 2.5; long numberBits = Double.doubleToLongBits(number); double result = Double.longBitsToDouble(numberBits & ZERO_OUT_LAST_32_BITS); } It zeroes out the last 32 bits of the binary representation of ...


7

The C++ standard, section 1.7 point 1 confirms this: The fundamental storage unit in the C++ memory model is the byte. A byte is at least large enough to contain any member of the basic execution character set (2.3) and the eight-bit code units of the Unicode UTF-8 encoding form and is composed of a contiguous sequence of bits, the number of ...


7

The expression !(x ^ 32) will do the trick for you if you insist. That will always work in C, and will also work in almost all C++ settings. Technically in C++ it evaluates to a boolean which in almost all circumstances will work like 0 or 1, but if you want a technically correct C++ answer: (0 | !(x^32)) or: (int)!(x ^ 32) or with the more ...


7

The macro tests the value of the y-th bit in x. You can't directly address bits, so the code starts by treating x as an array of bytes (the const char* cast). It then looks up the byte where the bit lives. There are 8 bits in a byte, so it divides by 8. Chasing performance, instead of simply dividing by 8, the code uses the binary trick of shifting right 3 ...


7

Only one bit is used for sign (negative or positive) Int32 values are represented in 31 bits, with the thirty-second bit used as a sign bit. Positive values are represented by using sign-and-magnitude representation. Negative values are in two's complement representation, MSDN Int32.MaxValue = 2^31 - 1 = 01111111111111111111111111111111 ...


7

You're getting an overflow exception because you're operating in a checked context, apparently. You can get around that by putting the code in an unchecked context - or just by making sure you don't perform the cast back to byte on a value that can be more than 255. For example: int shifted = b << rotateLeftBits; int highBits = shifted & 0xff; ...


7

Actually, to get the value of a long long integer you need to shift 1 to that bit position and here 1 has to be long long type. Your code is ok. Just change the following portion. long long getvalue(long long n,int pos) { return (n & (1LL << pos) ); } And remember to use 1ULL << pos, when you work on unsigned long long integer.


6

Semantically, you're correct, it doesn't matter. x & 01, x & 1, x & 0x1, etc will all do the exact same thing (and in every sane compiler, generate the exact same code). What you're seeing here is an author's convention, once pretty standard (but never universal), now much less so. The use of octal in this case is to make it clear that bitwise ...


6

What about one-liner? var mask = (Amenities)5722635; var result = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Amenities)) .Cast<Amenities>() .Where(value => mask.HasFlag(value)) .ToList(); You can cache result of Enum.GetValues(typeof(Amenities)).Cast<Amenities>() in order to improve performance.


5

See the ASCII table to understand the output you're getting: a has the decimal value of 97, and 97 is 01100001 in binary b has the decimal value of 98, and 97 is 01100010 in binary and so on.


5

Something like this should do the trick: enum WordMask { Hello = 0x01, Goodbye = 0x02, Morning = 0x04 }; Now, to check if a value contains the flags Goodbye and Morning (it will not care whether or not Hello is set): if ((value & (Goodbye | Morning)) == (Goodbye | Morning)) { // ... } You can generalize this so that you don't have ...


5

Indicate binary string[0] = 0b01001111; string[1] = 0b01101100; string[2] = 0b01100101; This reminds me of the joke: there are 10 kinds of programmers: those that understand binary and those that do not. As bytes are signed there still is a problem with 0b1xxxxxxx which would need to be a negative number. In that case use the following trick: string[2] ...


5

data[0]>>8 is 0. Remember that your data is defined as byte[] so it has 8bits per single item, so you are effectively cutting ALL bits off the data[0]. You want rather to take the lowest 4 bits from that byte by bitwise AND (00001111 = 0F) and then shift it leftwards as needed. So try this: var _4bit = data[0] >> 4; var _12bit = ((data[0] ...


5

In the link that you provided, it is explicitly stated: On some rare machines where branching is very expensive and no condition move instructions exist, the [code] might be faster than the obvious approach, r = (x < y) ? x : y Later on, it says: On some machines, evaluating (x < y) as 0 or 1 requires a branch instruction, so there may be no ...


5

From wikipedia: unsigned int rotl(unsigned int value, int shift) { return (value << shift) | (value >> (sizeof(value) * CHAR_BIT - shift)); }


5

Convert to long and mask away the desired bits, convert back: long l = Double.doubleToLongBits(); l &= 0xFFFFFFFF00000000L; double truncated = Double.longBitsToDouble(l); Although I'm not sure what you're trying to achive by that...


5

Your shifts are wrong. You are shifting by the index of the top-most bit, which isn't right. You must shift by the index of the lowermost (rightmost) bit in each field. So it should be: def fileRegOp(opcode, d, f): return (opcode << 8) | (d << 7) | f This gives, with some editing to add padding zeros on the left: >>> ...


5

A bit shift with negative right operand is undefined behavior as per C99 §6.5.7 ¶3. That means that the compiler is free to emit code that may not work reliably in case you have a negative shift (or, as per the usual rules about undefined behavior, it may as well make demons fly out of your nose). The correct way to perform that shift is, as suggested in ...


4

The relevant parts of the standard are 6.7.2 (5). Each of the comma-separated sets designates the same type, except that for bit-fields, it is implementation-defined whether the specifier int designates the same type as signed int or the same type as unsigned int. ...this explains why you (can) get -1 instead of 1 for the set bits. The other is 6.7.2.1 ...


4

Bytes are always composed of at least 8 bits. They can be larger than 8 bits, though this is fairly uncommon.


4

<< is a shift operator, not a rotate one. If you want to rotate, you can use (with suitable casting): b = (b >> 7) | ((b & 0x7f) << 1); The first part of that gets the leftmost bit down to the rightmost, the second part shifts all the other left. The or-ing them with | combines the two.


4

There's nothing in the question stating you can only make one pass of the data. So, assuming it's not a mistake, you could still use a bit set but do it in groups. For the first pass, check only the numbers from zero to thirty million (roughly). Second pass, check from thirty to sixty million. And so on. That would still allow you to find a missing number ...


4

The byte value 11010100 represents a negative number (-44), because the most significant bit is set. When this undergoes primitive widening conversion, it must still represent the same negative value in the two's complement representation. This done using sign extension. That means that all new bits are the same as the original sign bit. ...


4

I think it is due to bit operation AND. In binary 49 is 110001 4 is 000100 & = 000000 So it evaluates to false wheras 21 is 10101 4 is 00100 & = 00100 So you get a non-zero result which is true.


4

How about d = a ^ b ^ ~c; or d = ~(a ^ b ^ c); or d = ~a ^ b ^ c; The ^ has the property of flipping bits set to 1 and leaving bits set to 0. If you use ~ to flip that value you get flip for 0 and unchanged for 1.



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