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259

The XOR operation (x ^ 0x1) inverts bit 0. So the expression effectively means: if bit 0 of x is 0, or any other bit of x is 1, then the expression is true. Conversely the expression is false if x == 1. So the test is the same as: if (x != 1) and is therefore (arguably) unnecessarily obfuscated.


141

Declaring Bitmasks: Alternatively to assigning absolute values (1, 2, 4, …) you can declare bitmasks (how these are called) like this: typedef enum : NSUInteger { FileNotDownloaded = (1 << 0), // => 00000001 FileDownloading = (1 << 1), // => 00000010 FileDowloaded = (1 << 2) // => 00000100 } DownloadViewStatus; or ...


81

The traditional way to do this is to use the Flags attribute on an enum: [Flags] public enum Names { None = 0, Susan = 1, Bob = 2, Karen = 4 } Then you'd check for a particular name as follows: Names names = Names.Susan | Names.Bob; // evaluates to true bool susanIsIncluded = (names & Names.Susan) != Names.None; // evaluates to ...


68

^ is a XOR operation. 0x1 is 1 in hex format. x ^ 0x1 will invert the last bit of x. So, the condition (( 0 != ( x ^ 0x1 ) ) will be true if x is greater than 1 or if the last bit of x is 0. Which only leaves x==1 as a value at which the condition will be false. So it is equivalent to if (x != 1)


50

It's quite simple actually. First a bit of code to demonstrate how it can be implemented. If you don't understand anything about what this code is doing or how it works, feel free to ask additional questions in the comments: const FLAG_1 = 0b0001; // 1 const FLAG_2 = 0b0010; // 2 const FLAG_3 = 0b0100; // 4 const FLAG_4 = 0b1000; // 8 // Can you see the ...


44

Splendid question! Firstly, let's make some assumptions about "better". I'm assuming you don't much care about disk space - a bitmask is efficient from a space point of view, but I'm not sure that matters much if you're using SQL server. I'm assuming you do care about speed. A bitmask can be very fast when using calculations - but you won't be able to use ...


43

This may seem as oversimplified explanation, but if someone would like to go through it slowly it is below: ^ is a bitwise XOR operator in c, c++ and c#. A bitwise XOR takes two bit patterns of equal length and performs the logical exclusive OR operation on each pair of corresponding bits. Exclusive OR is a logical operation that outputs true ...


37

The construct if ((mask & FLAG3) == FLAG3) tests if all bits in FLAG3 are present in mask; if (mask & FLAG3) tests if any are present. If you know FLAG3 has exactly 1 bit set, they are equivalent, but if you are potentially defining compound conditions, it can be clearer to get into the habit of explicitly testing for all bits, if that's what you ...


35

Why not just do this... define('PERMISSION_DENIED', 0); define('PERMISSION_READ', 1); define('PERMISSION_ADD', 2); define('PERMISSION_UPDATE', 4); define('PERMISSION_DELETE', 8); //run function // this value would be pulled from a user's setting mysql table $_ARR_permission = 5; if($_ARR_permission & PERMISSION_READ) { echo 'Access granted.'; ...


34

You can easily do it using EnumSet import java.util.EnumSet; import static java.util.EnumSet.of; import static java.util.EnumSet.range; import static so.User.Permissions.CanBlah1; import static so.User.Permissions.CanBlah2; import static so.User.Permissions.CanBlah3; public class User { public enum Permissions { CanBlah1, CanBlah2, ...


30

Briefly bitmask helps to manipulate position of multiple values. There is a good example here ; Bitflags are a method of storing multiple values, which are not mutucally exclusive, in one variable. You've probably seen them before. Each flag is a bit position which can be set on or off. You then have a bunch of bitmasks #defined for each bit position so ...


27

The answer to your question is to use the Bitwise & like this: SELECT * FROM UserTable WHERE Roles & 6 != 0 The 6 can be exchanged for any combination of your bitfield where you want to check that any user has one or more of those bits. When trying to validate this I usually find it helpful to write this out longhand in binary. Your user table ...


27

It is exclusive OR (XOR) operator. To understand how it works you can run this simple code std::cout << "0x0 ^ 0x0 = " << ( 0x0 ^ 0x0 ) << std::endl; std::cout << "0x0 ^ 0x1 = " << ( 0x0 ^ 0x1 ) << std::endl; std::cout << "0x1 ^ 0x0 = " << ( 0x1 ^ 0x0 ) << std::endl; std::cout << ...


24

Bit fields are a very handy and efficient tool for dealing with flags or any set of boolean values in general. To understand them you first need to know how binary numbers work. After that you should check out the manual entries on bitwise operators and make sure you know how a bitwise AND, OR and left/right shift works. A bit field is nothing more than an ...


23

pStatus = malloc((<number of data points>/8) + 1); This does allocate enough bytes for your bits. However, pStatus[element] This accesses the element'th byte, not bit. So when element is more than one-eighth of the total number of bits, you're accessing off the end of the array allocated. I would define a few helper functions int ...


22

0x00000001 is 1 in binary, although it's written in hexadecimal (base-16) notation. That's the 0x part. & is the bit-wise 'AND' operator, which is used to do binary digit (bit) manipulations. i & 1 converts all of the binary digits of i to zero, except for the last one. It's straightforward to convert the resulting 1-bit number to a boolean, for ...


21

It's using a bitwise "and" operator to mask off all but the last bit. If the last bit is a 1, the number is odd. Is that enough explanation?


20

12414 in binary is: Binary number: 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 ------------------------------------------------------- Bit positions: 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Look at which bits are 1. Those are the flags that are set in the bitmask, which is created by using the bitwise OR operator to combine the flags: bitmask = TRADEABLE | ...


17

I see values from at least a handful of different enumerations in there... My first thought was to approach the problem by splitting the permissions up in logical groups (RuleGroupPermissions, RulePermissions, LocationPermissions, ...) and then having a class (WebAgentPermissions) exposing a property for each permission enum type. Since the permission ...


16

The fastest way is probably to build a lookup table of byte values versus the number of bits set in that byte. At least that was the answer when I interviewed at Google.


16

I think you want: example &= ~foo.c; In other words, perform a bitwise "AND" mask with every bit set except the one for c. EDIT: I should add an "except" to Unconstrained Melody at some point, so you could write: example = example.Except(foo.c); Let me know if this would be of interest to you, and I'll see what I can do over the weekend...


16

It checks that x is actually not 0x1... xoring x with 0x1 will result in 0 only if x is 0x1 ... this is an old trick mostly used in assembly language


15

In general: value = (value & ~mask) | (newvalue & mask); mask is a value with all bits to be changed (and only them) set to 1 - it would be 0xf in your case. newvalue is a value that contains the new state of those bits - all other bits are essentially ignored. This will work for all types for which bitwise operators are supported.


15

Your masking is incorrect - you should be masking against 255 (0xff) instead of 8. Shifting works in terms of "bits to shift by" whereas bitwise and/or work against the value to mask against... so if you want to only keep the bottom 8 bits, you need a mask which just has the bottom 8 bits set - i.e. 255. Note that if you're trying to split a number into two ...


15

The ^ operator is bitwise xor. And 0x1 is the number 1, written as a hexadecimal constant. So, x ^ 0x1 evaluates to a new value that is the same as x, but with the least significant bit flipped. The code does nothing more than compare x with 1, in a very convoluted and obscure fashion.


14

Remember that IPs are not a textual address, but a numeric ID. I have a similar situation (we're doing geo-ip lookups), and if you store all your IP addresses as integers (for example, my IP address is 192.115.22.33 so it is stored as 3228767777), then you can lookup IPs easily by using right shift operators. The downside of all these types of lookups is ...


14

I am going to assume that myState has the type of your enum State. The traditional use of enum is to create the constant values that a variable of this type can take. You wish to set you variable myState to a combination of the values defined in the enum. The enum defines 1, 2, 4, and 8 as valid values, yet you want to be able to set the variable to 4 | 2 ...


14

well if (8 & bitmask == 8 ) { } will check if the bitmask contains 8. more complex int mask = 8 | 12345; if (mask & bitmask == mask) { } may be interested by enum and more particularly FlagsAttibute.


14

While @Regexident has provided an excellent answer - I must mention the modern Objective-C way of declaring Enumerated options with NS_OPTIONS: typedef NS_OPTIONS(NSUInteger, DownloadViewStatus) { FileNotDownloaded = 0, FileDownloading = 1 << 0, FileDownloaded = 1 << 1 }; Further Reference: NSHipster I Am The Walrus


13

You should definitely use an INT (if you need 32 flags) or BIGINT (for 64 flags). If you need more flags you could use BINARY (but you should probably also ask yourself why you need so many flags in your application). Besides, if you use an integral type, you can use standard bitwise operators directly without converting a byte array to an integral type. ...



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