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83

Let me assume that negative value is represented using two's complement. In this case, -i can be calculated as (~i)+1 (flip bits, then add 1). For example, let me consider i = 44. Then, in binary, i = 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010 1100 ~i = 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1101 0011 -i = (~i)+1 = 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1101 ...


67

It sets result to the (unsigned) value resulting from putting the 8 bits of value in the lowest 8 bits of result. The reason something like this is necessary is that byte is a signed type in Java. If you just wrote: int result = value; then result would end up with the value ff ff ff fe instead of 00 00 00 fe. A further subtlety is that the & is ...


22

He meant that taking number mod 2^n is equivalent to stripping off all but the n lowest-order (right-most) bits of number. For example, if n == 2, number number mod 4 00000001 00000001 00000010 00000010 00000011 00000011 00000100 00000000 00000101 00000001 00000110 00000010 00000111 00000011 00001000 00000000 ...


21

In case anyone wanted a more general proof as well, Assume x has the format a10k (meaning here, some bitstring a, followed by a 1, followed by k zeroes). -x is (by definition) the same thing as ~x + 1, so x & -x = (fill in) a10k & -(a10k) = (def. of negation) a10k & ~(a10k) + 1 = (apply inversion) a10k & ~a01k + 1 = (add 1) a10k & ...


17

That formula checks to see whether a number is a power of 2 (if your condition as written is true, then the number is not a power of two). Stated another way, your test checks to see whether there is more than one "1" bit set in the binary representation of $n. If there is zero or only one bit set, then your test will be false. It is by far the most ...


16

From http://www.coderanch.com/t/236675/java-programmer-SCJP/certification/xff The hex literal 0xFF is an equal int(255). Java represents int as 32 bits. It look like this in binary: 00000000 00000000 00000000 11111111 When you do a bit wise AND with this value(255) on any number, it is going to mask(make ZEROs) all but the lowest 8 bits of the number ...


13

With the & operator


13

No, it doesn't. if(bts[i] == 0x01) means if bts[i] is equal to 1. if((bts[i] & 0x01) == 0x01) means if the least significant bit of bts[i] is equal to 1. Example. bts[i] = 9 //1001 in binary if(bts[i] == 0x01) //false if((bts[i] & 0x01) == 0x01) //true


12

In C++, a constant with a leading 0 is an octal constant, not a decimal constant. It is still an integer constant but 070 == 56. This is the cause of the difference in behaviour.


11

This two functions are a modified implementation of a Binary index tree (Fenwick tree) data structure. Here is two pictures to supplement MikeCAT's answer showing how i variable updates for different values. The "get" function: For assume max value in of input in function is 15 for simplicity of representation. A node with number t in on it represents ...


10

Yes, 0xff is just 1111 1111. But this is attempting to display the unsigned byte value, even though in Java bytes are signed. The value 0xff is -1 for a signed byte, but it's 255 in a short. When a byte value of 0xff is read, printing the value would yield -1. So it's assigned to a short which has a bigger range and can store byte values that would ...


8

It's an old trick that gives a number with a single bit in it, the bottom bit that was set in n. At least in two's complement arithmetic, which is just about universal these days. The reason it works: the negative of a number is produced by inverting the number, then adding 1 (that's the definition of two's complement). When you add 1, every bit starting at ...


8

It is a logical operator on bools that evaluates both sides regardless of the value of the left side.


8

You can't assume anything about either of these operations, a compile could optimise both to the same instructions. And, indeed, both clang and gcc will translate them into a single and instruction. Unfortunately, due to the nature of % having a specified return value for negative values since ISO C99, some extra work is required for signed integers. As ...


7

How about: head = (head & 0xff000000) | (new_size & 0x00ffffff)


7

No, the extra 0 means the number is read as octal (base 8). That means it doesn't say 70, but 56: 0000 0000 0001 0000 '16 0000 0000 0011 1000 & '56 ------------------- 0000 0000 0001 0000


7

In JavaScript, using any bitwise operator causes the number to be first truncated to a 32-bit integer. That means it won't work for some larger values. (Well, quite a few larger values :-) The % operator doesn't do that. edit — hey all you nice people who've upvoted me: hold your horses :-) C5H8NNaO4 points out that the integer truncation process ...


7

Compare KB194206 (the gist of it: "The Microsoft Jet database engine does not support bitwise operations in SQL. This behavior is by design."), which basically means you're stuck with VBA. And bitwise in VBA is very simple, because in VBA all locical operators are bitwise. Just create a wrapper function: Function BitAnd(Value1 As Long, Value2 As Long) As ...


6

Use the & operator. Binary & operators are predefined for the integral types[.] For integral types, & computes the bitwise AND of its operands. From MSDN.


6

Truth table for AND A B AND T T T T F F F T F F F F Truth table for OR A B OR T T T T F T F T T F F F Truth table for XOR A B XOR T T F T F T F T T F F F So, XOR is just like OR, except it's false if A and B are true. So, (A OR B) AND (NOT (A AND B)), which is (A OR B) AND ...


6

Consider when you take a number modulo 10. If you do that, you just get the last digit of the number. 334 % 10 = 4 12345 % 10 = 5 Likewise if you take a number modulo 100, you just get the last two digits. 334 % 100 = 34 12345 % 100 = 45 So you can get the modulo of a power of two by looking at its last digits in binary. That's the same as ...


6

console.log((4294901760 & 4294967040) >>> 0); Append >>> 0 to have it interpret your operation as unsigned. Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/JamZw/ More info: Bitwise operations on 32-bit unsigned ints?


6

Theory The problem is that you're not using the correct format specification to print sizeof(). printf("size of x : %d,x = %lld, size of y : %d, y : %lld\n", sizeof(x), x, sizeof(y), y); You're using %d, which expects an int, to print a size_t which is (a) an unsigned type and (b) most probably 8 bytes, not 4 bytes like an int would be. The correct way ...


5

If you are referring to a&=a-1; then it is a bitwise and operation of a and a-1 copied into a afterwards. Edit: As copied from Tadeusz A. Kadłubowski in the comment: a = a & (a-1);


5

You forgot to update the mask: for(int i=1; i<=32; i++) { if( (mask & number) != 0 ) System.out.print(1); else System.out.print(0); if( (i % 4) == 0 ) System.out.print(" "); mask = mask >> 1; }


5

First, this code is valid PHP, so your title is poor. Second, the binary arithmetic going on looks something like this: 42 = 101010 & 41 = 101001 ----------- 40 = 101000 Like Greg states this is the fastest way to check for a power of 2 number, but the code you've given checks to see if the number is not a power of 2. This can easily be ...


5

Enums will have values 0, 1, 2, 3, ... by default. AFAIK adding FlagsAttribute doesn't change this. I think you need to explicitly set the values you want, e.g.: [Flags] public enum ConsoleStates : byte { TopLevel = 0, All = 1, MainMenu = 2, SingleLeagueSelected = 4, }


5

Using bitwise AND with non-booleans will bitwise AND together all of the bits of the two numbers one by one. In this case, the number 0x7FFFFFFFL is the hexadecimal representation of a number that is a 0 bit followed by 31 1 bits: 01111111111111111111111111111111 By ANDing this with an integer, you preserve the lower 31 bits (since 1 & x = x for any ...



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