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Based on what I saw on the internet and various google searches, there is a may to take the standard class 'PostgreSQLDialect' and we extended it to our own class: public class MyPostgreSQLDialect extends PostgreSQLDialect We then added code in here which created a special 'bitwise_and' function. I had to change the database dialect in my Spring ...


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First let's think what does bitwise AND do to two numbers, for example ( 0b means base 2) 4 & 7 = 0b100 & 0b111 = 0b100 5 & 7 = 0b101 & 0b111 = 0b101 5 & 6 = 0b101 & 0b110 = 0b100 The operator & is keeping those bits which is set in both number. For several numbers, the operator & is keeping those bits which is 1 in every ...


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Typical patterns for testing bit flags are // Entire key match if (returned_value & value_to_test == value_to_test) { ... } // Partial key match if (returned_value & value_to_test != 0) { ... } E.g. if you want to test if pocket #3 is full: if (returned_value & POCKET.P3_FULL == POCKET.P3_FULL) { ... } You can combine flags via | ...


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Look at the first position where the bit patterns of two consecutive numbers n - 1 and n differ. A moment's reflection shows that this bit must be 1 for n and 0 for n - 1. It cannot be otherwise. To the left of that bit everything is equal, and to the right of that bit the bigger of the two has only 0s and the smaller has only 1s. It cannot be otherwise. ...


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From MDN The operands of all bitwise operators are converted to signed 32-bit integers in two's complement format. When interpreted as a signed 32-bit integer, the value 0xd41ddb80 represents the number -736240768. Using any bitwise operator on this number will coerce it into a signed 32-bit integer: console.log(~~0xd41ddb80) console.log(0xd41ddb80 &...


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In C: 010 is octal for 8 10 is decimal for 10. 011 is octal for 9. and, while we're at it ... 100 is decimal for 100. If you want binary you need to do something different: Some compilers/standards accept 0b010 for binary constants. Otherwise you need to convert to decimal, octal (starting 0), or hexadecimal (starting 0x) The answer to the ...


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Remember that Flags enums don't have to all be purely single bit values. E.g. imagine (with better names) that your enum was : <Flags> Public Enum Names None = 0 Test = 1 Test2 = 2 Test3 = 4 Test4 = 8 Test2AndTest4 = 10 End Enum Now, you wouldn't want to just test that test And Names.Test2AndTest4 is non-zero ...


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You are correct in stating that you can effectively replace this: If (test And Names.Test3) = Names.Test3 Then with this If (test And Names.Test3) Then But, the second example will not compile with Option Strict On as you rightly get the error: Option Strict On disallows implicit conversions from 'Names' to 'Boolean' so in order to get this to compile ...


4

When using a bitwise AND, you clear all bits not set in the mask. So you're actually only retaining one bit. If you only want to clear one, set all bits to 1 except the one you want. You can use the the ~ operator to invert all bits in your mask as follows: value = value & ~(1<<2); value = value & ~(0x2); That said, These two statements ...


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Formal answer Strictly speaking, if you are working with LSB then first form value = value & (1<<2);, which is equal to (pseudo, or using GNU extension, code that allows binary constants) value = value & 0b100; will set to 0 all bits except bit 2 and the second form value = value & 0x2; (or value = value & 0b10;) will set to 0 all bits ...


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You could mimic the same behaviour using a reduce operation on an array of your method calls, e.g. /* example setup */ struct Foo { let bar: Bool init(_ bar: Bool) { self.bar = bar } func isTrue() -> Bool { print("\(bar) foo!"); return bar } } let a = Foo(false) let b = Foo(false) let c = Foo(true) /* naturally all three method calls will ...


2

There is no such special operator but I would probably do it in this way: if ![a.isBool(), b.isBool(), c.isBool()].contains(false) { or just let aCondition = a.isBool() let bCondition = b.isBool() let cCondition = c.isBool() if aCondition && bCondition && cCondition { but you can can also define your own operator to that.


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What you were doing in Objective-C was not "elegant". It was skanky and you shouldn't have been doing it. If you want to call three methods, just call those three methods! But forming a boolean expression, you should use the logical operators, not the bitwise operators. So, for example: let (ok1, ok2, ok3) = (a.isBool(), b.isBool(), c.isBool()) let ok = ok1 ...



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