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5

From MDN The operands of all bitwise operators are converted to signed 32-bit integers in two's complement format. When interpreted as a signed 32-bit integer, the value 0xd41ddb80 represents the number -736240768. Using any bitwise operator on this number will coerce it into a signed 32-bit integer: console.log(~~0xd41ddb80) console.log(0xd41ddb80 &...


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The bitwise compliment of 0 is all 1s so ANDing with it gives you exactly the other input to the AND, in this case 2. Assuming 8 bits to save space: 0 = 00000000 ~0 = 11111111 2 = 00000010 ~0&2 = 00000010


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Maybe this can help: int loop(int x) { x = x & 0xaaaaaaaa; // Set all even numbered bits in x to zero x = x ^ 0xaaaaaaaa; // If all odd numbered bits in x are 1, x becomes zero x = !x; // The operation returns 1 if x is zero - otherwise 0 return x; }


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No, neither & nor | performs conversion to an ASCII character, this conversion is performed by the last v.toString(16). & and | just do bitwise operations. Before the second line of the function, r contains a random integer number between 0x0 and 0xf. It can be represented with four bits: r == abcd, where a, b, c and d are 0 or 1. r & 0x3 ...


3

A lot of Undefined Behaviour are being exploited here. First assumption is that fields of union can be accessed in place of each other, which is, in itself, UB. Furthermore, coder assumes that: sizeof(int) ==sizeof(float)`, that floats have a given length of mantissa and exponent, that all union members are aligned to zero, that the binary representation of ...


3

In C: 010 is octal for 8 10 is decimal for 10. 011 is octal for 9. and, while we're at it ... 100 is decimal for 100. If you want binary you need to do something different: Some compilers/standards accept 0b010 for binary constants. Otherwise you need to convert to decimal, octal (starting 0), or hexadecimal (starting 0x) The answer to the ...


2

You evidently have at least three problems here: You use a bitwise "or" (|) where you want bitwise "and" (&). You are using data where you want an element of data. Your particular use oughtn't even to compile, as pointers are not allowed operands for bitwise arithmetic operators. You fail to shift the data / masked data. You also claim in comments ...


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The easiest thing you can do if you want to have the single byte values is to right shift data instead of shifting mask. As @harold has correcty mentioned, 'oring' a byte with 0xff makes no sense. for(int i= 0; i < indices; i++) { uint64_t val = data[i]; for(int byte = 0; byte < 8; byte++) { printf("index[%d], byte[%d]: 0x%02x\n", ...


2

Remember that Flags enums don't have to all be purely single bit values. E.g. imagine (with better names) that your enum was : <Flags> Public Enum Names None = 0 Test = 1 Test2 = 2 Test3 = 4 Test4 = 8 Test2AndTest4 = 10 End Enum Now, you wouldn't want to just test that test And Names.Test2AndTest4 is non-zero ...


2

You are correct in stating that you can effectively replace this: If (test And Names.Test3) = Names.Test3 Then with this If (test And Names.Test3) Then But, the second example will not compile with Option Strict On as you rightly get the error: Option Strict On disallows implicit conversions from 'Names' to 'Boolean' so in order to get this to compile ...


1

If you want to know if the (only) 1 bit of B is also set in A you simply need to bit-wise AND the two : if (A & B != 0) { } Since B has only a single 1 bit, A & B will be non-zero if and only if the same bit is 1 in A.


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To check if a certain bit is set, use the & operator with the mask that represents this bit. For example: long vectorValue = 985739487549L; long bitMask = 32L; boolean hasBit = false; int vectorMaskedValue = vectorValue & bitMask; if (vectorMaskedValue == bitMask) { hasbit = true; }


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There is a non-loop way too. There are simple tricks to do things with the lowest set bit, such as setting it to zero or isolating it. In this case, we'll set it to zero: int x = days & (days - 1); This works because subtracting one will borrow through the trailing zeroes until it gets to the lowest set bit, which it resets and then the borrowing ...


1

You have to use a loop anyway. For java, right? The code: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println(yourHomework(51,1)); System.out.println(yourHomework(173,2)); } public static int yourHomework(int number, int index) { // LOL!! Joke! for (int i = index + 1; i < 32; i++) { ...


1

Not sure it is the most effective, but I think this is a rather simple solution: int bitValue(int num, int nPosition) { return ( num >> nPosition ) % 2; } int swapBits(int num, int nPosition, int mPosition) { int nVal = bitValue(num, nPosition); int mVal = bitValue(num, mPosition); if (nVal != mVal) { if (1 == nVal) ...


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You could use logarithms. A quick Google search for "fast log2 c++" brought up a pretty long list of ideas. Then your answer is log2(x)/2, and you'd have to find some way to make sure that your result is a whole number if you only want an answer for exact powers of 4. If you are programming for an x86 processor, you can use BitScanForward & ...


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The mathematics would be to keep dividing by 4 until the result is no longer divisible by 4. If you really want to do it with bitwise operations, techniques here can be used to count the number of trailing zero bits (i.e. the number of times a value is divisible by 2). Those can be adjusted to count pairs of trailing bits (i.e. divisibility by a power of ...


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Typical patterns for testing bit flags are // Entire key match if (returned_value & value_to_test == value_to_test) { ... } // Partial key match if (returned_value & value_to_test != 0) { ... } E.g. if you want to test if pocket #3 is full: if (returned_value & POCKET.P3_FULL == POCKET.P3_FULL) { ... } You can combine flags via | ...


1

You will not have to worry about overflows in Python unless you are using operations that involve data types that can be overflowed. This does not include Python's built in number types (int, float, long, complex). For positive values of n, the documentation holds. The reason they specify that overflow checking is done is because external libraries, ...


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I'm guessing that you do not like the idea of using integers because it obfuscates your underlying data. Plus it makes it difficult to work with strings that start with '0' (because they trimmed off when converting to an integer), not to mention the subtleties of signed integers and endianness. Try using the bitarray module, can be installed with pip: pip ...


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It is entirely unclear what you mean, so here's some MISRA code review: int is not MISRA compliant. Use a fixed-width integer type, preferably from stdint.h. 0x0f literals like these are not MISRA compliant. All literals need to have an u or U suffix, even hexadecimal ones. val |=0xf0; is not MISRA compliant. You aren't allowed to use bit-wise operators on ...


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unsigned val = whatever(); val = (val | 0xF0u) & ~1u; The nested assignment is unnecessary. I don't have a MISRA copy handy, but I think this should pass. The use of unsigned literals and types is because MISRA disallows bitwise operations on signed integers.



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