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216

In Java, it means nothing. But that comment says that the line is specifically for GWT, which is a way to compile Java to JavaScript. In JavaScript, integers are kind of like doubles-that-act-as-integers. They have a max value of 2^53, for instance. But bitwise operators treat numbers as if they're 32-bit, which is exactly what you want in this code. In ...


8

otherNum = (num + 1) % 3 otherOtherNum = (num + 2) % 3


7

You can also do this with XOR and bit masking. #include <stdio.h> void f(unsigned val, unsigned ary[3]) { ary[0] = val; ary[1] = (ary[0] ^ 1) & 1; ary[2] = (ary[0] ^ 2) & 2; } int main() { unsigned ary[3] = {0}; f(0, ary); printf("f(0) = %d %d %d\n", ary[0], ary[1], ary[2]); f(1, ary); printf("f(1) = %d %d ...


7

21 in binary is 10101, whereas 10 in binary is 01010. A bitwise & returns 00000, or 0, which is false.


6

This is a valid warning: c <<= 1; is equivalent to: c = c << 1 and the rules for << say that the operands are promoted and in this case will be promoted to int and the result is of the promoted type. So there will be a conversion from int to unsigned char at the end which may result in an altered value. The code is valid, the warning ...


6

bytes is a pointer. Change float f1 = reinterpret_cast<float&>(bytes); to float f1 = *reinterpret_cast<float*>(bytes); // Cast to a different pointer... ^ // ^ ...and dereference that pointer.


6

You could use an in-register lookup table, if the restriction on look-up tables means avoiding memory access. The in-register lookup-table is simply a compile-time constant. const int tab = ((1 << 0) | (2 << 4) | (0 << 8) | (2 << 12) | (0 << 16) | (1 << 20)); int num = rand(2); ...


6

result = (a & b) | (b & c) | (c & a);


6

You're only checking the values 0 and 1. Try other values and you'll see differences. int a = 4, b = 2; puts(a && b ? "true" : "false"); puts(a & b ? "true" : "false"); This prints: true false Bitwise operators only work with integers. Logical operators can be used with pointers, floating point numbers, and other non-integral types. ...


4

This value is not binary. It is octal. uint8_t sizeOfGlobalColorTable = 010; In (Objective) C constants starting from 0 are interpreted as octal values. What you actually write is b1000 & b0111 = 0. It should be: uint8_t sizeOfGlobalColorTable = 0x2;


4

@Henrik has already offered a nice straightforward solution which requires 5 operations. FWIW if efficiency is a concern you can reduce this to 4 operations: result = (a & (b | c)) | (b & c);


4

This code could use some comments. This leaves x as it is if it is positive or takes the one's complement if negative. This allows the calculation to search for the most significant one regardless of positive or negative x = (sign & (~x)) | (~sign & x); I think the following would have been more clear: x = sign ? ~x : x; Next is a search for ...


4

You haven't told Python that you're entering binary numbers; like C, Python will interpret 0010000000000000 as octal (8**13), and 1011110110011001 as decimal. Use the 0b prefix and bin function instead: >>> a = 0b1011110110011001 >>> b = 0b1100001110000101 >>> bin(a|b) '0b1111111110011101' Your 8-bit (Python doesn't know that ...


3

Something like this perhaps? int result = fire(r, c); if (result & BS_SHIP_HIT) { std::cout << "Ship of size " << result & BS_SHIP_MASK << " hit\n"; } If the BS_SHIP_HIT bit is set in result, the the result of result & BIT_SHIP_HIT will be equal to BS_SHIP_HIT otherwise the result will be zero (which is equivalent to ...


3

For C#, the C# V5 specification (as included with VS 2013) says: In §7.11.1defines the available operators: int operator |(int x, int y); uint operator |(uint x, uint y); long operator |(long x, long y); ulong operator |(ulong x, ulong y); so there are no mixed type versions of binary-or. In §6.12 "6.1.2 Implicit numeric conversions", the following ...


3

The Swift floating point types have a _toBitPattern() method: let x = Float(1.5) let bytes1 = x._toBitPattern() println(String(format: "%#08x", bytes1)) // 0x3fc00000 let bytes2: UInt32 = 0b00111111110000000000000000000000 println(String(format: "%#08x", bytes2)) // 0x3fc00000 println(bytes1 == bytes2) // true This method is part of the ...


3

My 2 pee. int main() { std::srand(std::time(0)); int num = std::rand() % 3; //random number from 0-2 int otherNum = (0b001001 >> (num << 1)) & 0b11; int otherOtherNum = (0b010010 >> (num << 1)) & 0b11; std::cout << num << '\n'; std::cout << otherNum << '\n'; std::cout ...


3

[(a*x)^b]*c=d [(a*x)^b]=d/c (a*x)^b^b=(d/c)^b //double xor with b retrieves initial value (a*x)=(d/c)^b x = ((d/c)^b) / a


3

The operands of a bitwise operation in JavaScript are always treated as int32, and in PHP this is not the case. So, when performing the left shift on 1111044149, this happens in JS: 01000010001110010011000000110101 (original, 32-bit) 00001000111001001100000011010100 (left shifted 2 positions, "01" is truncated) = 149209300 And in PHP, the bits do not get ...


3

0x80 represent 128 and 0x40 represent 64. If you print 0x80 | 64 it will output 192. When you cast to byte 128 becomes -128 as 128 is higher then Byte.MAX_VALUE which is 127. So the expression you evaluate is -128 | 64, while you were probably expecting 128 | 64, and will result in your output, -64.


2

Objective-C is an extension of C. The behaviour is therefore exactly the same as for C. Google for "C standard draft" and download a copy of a draft for the latest C standard (the drafts are free, the final standard costs about $60, but the draft is just fine unless you write compilers for a living). Then you look for "integer promotions". In general, as ...


2

Try the following: /* packed starts at 0 */ uint8_t packed = 0; /* one bit of the flag is kept and shifted to the last position */ packed |= ((globalColorTableFlag & 0x1) << 7); /* three bits of the resolution are kept and shifted to the fifth position */ packed |= ((colorResolution & 0x7) << 4); /* one bit of the flag is kept and ...


2

Just format the output back to binary: print format(N|M, 'b') This uses the format() function to produce a binary string again; the 'b' format produces a base-2 binary output: >>> format(7, 'b') '111' If you needed to preserve the original inputs exactly as typed, then assign the output of the int() calls to new variables: binary1, binary2 = ...


2

It tests if the result is falsey. In Python, values such as False, None, 0, empty strings, empty lists, etc. are "falsey", while others are truthy. In this case, it's effectively comparing the result of the bitwise AND with zero. if (int & (1 << position)) != 0: # same thing


2

You can cast it to byte : byte toSend = (byte)0xFF; Forget the other part of my answer. I'm a bit sleep deprived. Actually it's -1 that is represented as 11111111. But (byte)0xFF works just fine.


2

You're overwriting the state variable this.addFlag = function(flag){ state = (state | flag); // that's the global variable defined outside } var state = new State(); the state variable, is no longer a new instance of the function, but 0 instead, you need to access this.state instead this.addFlag = function(flag){ this.state = (state | flag); // ...


2

The problem is that the methods in the class are changing the global state variable that you used to hold the instance of the class, instead of changing the property in the class. The first call overwrites the variable, so the second call fails as the variable no longer contains the object. Javascript doesn't have object scope, so using the state identifier ...


1

you could try something like this: function State(){ return { state: 0, addFlag: function(flag){ this.state = (this.state | flag); }, removeFlag: function(flag){ this.state = (~this.state | flag); } } }


1

Although you're only using 1s and 0s, this doesn't make the numbers you're typing in binary numbers: they're decimal (or octal if you start with 0). If you want to use binary numbers, prefix them with 0b (assuming Python 2.6 at least). See this question. You may also find bin() useful if you want to print out the results. EDIT: I get the following ...


1

The if statement checks the "truthiness" of the expression. For instance, if you had: if some_expression: ... That's equivalent to writing: if bool(some_expression): ... You don't have to call bool() explicitly, but there's relatively little harm in doing so if you want to. Some programmers consider it bad style, since it's not strictly ...



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